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«extract from Narrative prepared by: MacRostie Historic Advisors LLC Existing Building and Condition: Date of original construction: Circa 1882; 1891; ...»

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Building 24/25, Pabst Brewing Company Complex

1003-1023 West Juneau Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

extract from Narrative prepared by:

MacRostie Historic Advisors LLC

Existing Building and Condition:

Date of original construction: Circa 1882; 1891; 1901; ongoing alterations through the 1990s

Building 24/25 is a six-to-eight-story cream brick block which rests on a rock-face,

regularly coursed limestone foundation. Architecturally and historically the building is a prominent component of the Pabst Brewing Company Complex (listed on the National Register in 2003) located on a hill at the northwest edge of Milwaukee’s central business district. The block is composed of Building 24 (Malt Elevator) and Building 25 (Malt House) which are similar stylistically, were physically connected historically, and were built to serve an overall function.

Building 24/25 is located at the southwest corner of West Juneau Avenue and North 10th Street in the heart of the historic brewery complex. The rectangular-shaped building is composed of two blocks – the massive east/west rectangular footprint of Building 25 at the corner of West Juneau and North 10th and the slimmer north/south footprint of Building 24 which abuts Building 25 on the west. Historically part of a densely built-up manufacturing complex, to the north of the building (across West Juneau Avenue) is Building 20/21 which, together with Building 24/25, supports the iconic “PABST” sign which spans West Juneau Avenue at the buildings’ roof lines.

Building 24/25 has been vacant since the Pabst Brewing Company ceased operations at the site in 1997.

Work and Impact on Building:

The proposed project will sensitively rehabilitate Building 24/25 for a total of 118 apartments units and amenities.

On the exterior, the deteriorated masonry will be stabilized, repaired, and cleaned. Non-historic brick infill will be removed from all window openings and new replica window units installed to restore the building’s historic fenestration pattern and appearance. The six-story malt storage silos which form the rear of Building 24 will be retained as an industrial touchstone to the site’s beer-making history.

A major portion of the former malt drying kiln area will be retained as a double-height activity space with a mezzanine; one of two surviving brick kilns will be retained and repurposed as an Activity Room. A new open atrium will be installed in the center of Building 25. Existing upper floor slabs will be removed and new floors installed to align with the historic fenestration pattern. On the upper floors, the former open and utilitarian spaces will be partitioned along the perimeter for resident units, but will remain open in the central portion of each floor as common areas and support services.

Overall, it is the intent of the project to maintain and celebrate the building’s industrial and brewing past on the interior by exposing existing structure and existing brick walls where possible, salvaging and reusing machinery and industrial materials in public spaces, and maintaining the industrial aesthetic when new materials are introduced.

Architectural Feature: Exterior Masonry Date of Feature: Circa 1882; 1891; 1901; ongoing alterations through the 1990s

Existing Feature and Condition:

Building 25 The Malt House, which comprises the eastern portion of Building 24/25, is a six-to-eight-story cream brick block which rests on a rock-face, regularly coursed limestone foundation. The monumental twelve-by-six- bay block features an arcaded brick corbelled cornice with a limestone stringer course directly below. Additional stringcourses are found above the first and third stories. Simple, slightly projecting brick pilasters divide the bays which contain regularlyspaced single and paired, round-arch and square window openings with limestone sills and brick hoods or lintels. Most window openings have been in filled with brick. Larger, modified brick-in filled openings at the ground floor on all facades were originally window openings of similar size to those existing. The cream brick masonry is in overall good condition, but requires localized repair/replacement and overall cleaning and will be re-pointed as needed. The limestone elements are in good condition; some limestone window sills have been replaced with concrete.

Exterior clay tile walls on the inward-facing elevations of the seventh floor penthouse are in deteriorated condition. A parged clay tile head house on the roof of the east penthouse is also deteriorated.

Building 24 The Malt Elevator is the western-most portion of Building 24/25 and abuts the Malt House.

Resting on a rock-face limestone foundation, this eight-story structure consists of a rectangular cream brick block facing West Juneau Avenue behind which are glazed tile silos arranged in two rows of seven. The primary (north) façade features simple, round-arch, recessed brick panels with stone sills and a stone stringcourse beneath the top two stories. Original window openings have been in-filled with brick or louvers. The cream brick masonry is in overall good condition, but requires localized repair/replacement and overall cleaning and will be re-pointed as needed.

Work and Impact on Feature:Building 25





All existing brick window infill will be removed to restore the historic fenestration pattern. On the first floor of the east elevation and on the east portion of the north elevation new window openings will be created within the existing rectangular infill in a pattern consistent with the historic fenestration. Additionally, new window openings will be created at the current seventh floor penthouse level on the north, east, south, and a portion of the west elevations in blind openings between existing pilasters.

The deteriorated clay tile penthouse walls will be removed and replaced with new construction. New construction will link the east and west penthouse levels at the seventh floor.

The deteriorated clay tile head house on the roof of the east penthouse will be removed.

Exterior masonry will be cleaned, repaired, and re-pointed where necessary. Where mortar has deteriorated, the mortar will be removed and the areas re-pointed with a mortar mix consistent with the original material. Cracked, damaged, or missing brick and limestone will be replaced in-kind. Cleaning of exterior masonry will be accomplished using the gentlest means possible without damaging the surface of the masonry.

Specifications for the mortar mix, masonry restoration, and cleaning will be for review and approval before commencement of work. Test patches of the products and techniques will also be undertaken and photographs of these test patches provided for review and approval during the construction phase of the project.

Building 24

Brick infill on the top floors of the west elevation will be removed and windows installed.

New window openings will be created on the secondary west elevation at the mid-section of the building; these will be simple punched openings. The two rows of glazed tile silos will be retained and repaired; the one-story clay tile structure atop them will be removed and the silo caps retained and repaired. A loading dock entrance will be inserted at the base of the two northern-most silos to provide access to the interior of the building on this extremely constrained site. The open interstitial space between Building 25 and Building 24, including machinery (some of which will be salvaged for display within the completed project), platforms, and clay tile structure will be removed except for the inset brick wall with round headed window opening at the second level.

Exterior masonry will be cleaned, repaired, and re-pointed where necessary. Where mortar has deteriorated, the mortar will be removed and the areas re-pointed with a mortar mix consistent with the original material. Cracked, damaged, or missing brick and limestone will be replaced in-kind. Cleaning of exterior masonry will be accomplished using the gentlest means possible without damaging the surface of the masonry.

Specifications for the mortar mix, masonry restoration, and cleaning will be provided for review and approval before commencement of work. Test patches of the products and techniques will also be undertaken and photographs of these test patches provided for review and approval during the construction phase of the project.

Architectural Feature: Fire Escapes Date of Feature: Circa 1890s with later alterations

Existing Feature and Condition:

Two fire escapes are located on the north elevation of Building 25 and one fire escape is located on the north elevation of Building 24. They are each composed of metal pipe balconies at various floors connected by a metal ladder which extends to the ground. The fire escapes are in fair condition.

Work and Impact on Feature:

The fire escapes will be retained and stabilized.

Architectural Feature: Windows Date of Feature: Circa 1882; 1891; 1901; ongoing alterations through the 1990s

Existing Feature and Condition:

Building 25 The Malt House, which comprises the eastern portion of Building 24/25, is a seven-to-eightstory, twelve-by- six-bay cream brick block. Simple, slightly projecting brick pilasters divide the bays which contain regularly-spaced single and paired, round-arch and square window openings with limestone sills and brick hoods or lintels. Most window openings have been in-filled with brick; however, historic photographs document that the openings historically contained multi-paned wood sash. Some remnant wood sash survive in poor condition. Larger, modified brick in-filled openings at the ground floor on all facades were originally window openings of similar size to those existing on the upper floors.

Building 24

The primary (north) façade features simple, round-arch, recessed brick panels with stone sills and a stone stringcourse beneath the top two stories. Most original window openings have been in-filled with brick or louvers. Surviving window sash at the second level of the north elevation are wood with non-historic safety glass and are in poor condition.

Work and Impact on Feature:

In both buildings non-historic brick infill will be removed from all window openings and new replica wood window units installed to restore the historic fenestration pattern and appearance.

The design, pane configuration, dimensions, and profiles of the replacement units will be based on the remnant surviving wood units which will also be replaced with new wood sash.

Replacement sash will have an interior and exterior applied muntin and internal space bar.

The proposed new window openings will also receive new wood units based on the historic model.

Architectural Feature: Entries Date of Feature: Circa 1882; 1891; 1901; ongoing alterations through the 1990s

Existing Feature and Condition:

Building 25 The primary entrance is located toward the center of the north elevation and is in-filled with plywood double doors beneath a round-arch hood with tympanum and flanking wood trim which, according to historic photographs, supported a rounded wood and copper hood. The original wood doors are no longer extant, but the heavily molded wood door trim survives on the interior.

Two secondary single doorways with metal doors are located on the lower level of the south elevation.

Building 24 A large vehicular opening at the ground floor of the interstitial space between Building 25 and Building 24 services an internal loading dock.

Work and Impact on Feature:

Building 25 The existing north entry will continue to serve as the building’s primary access. A new glass and metal canopy will be installed extending out to the curb to provide a covered drop-off zone. A new single wood- and-glass door (3’ x 8) and flanking sidelights will be installed within the existing opening. The design of the glazed and paneled door, as well as the wood and copper hood, will replicate the historic condition as depicted in photographs. The semicircular bas-relief copper tympanum visible in a historic photo is also lost, and will be replaced with a glazed transom panel to admit more natural light to the entry vestibule. The two secondary entries on the south elevation will remain and will receive new metal security doors.

Building 24

The former loading dock entrance in the base of the interstitial space between the two buildings will be in-filled with a simple glass and metal assembly with single door, sidelights, and transoms. A loading dock entrance will be inserted at the base of the two northern-most silos to provide access to the interior of the building for loading, deliveries, and trash removal.

Architectural Feature: Roof and Rooftop Structures Date of Feature: Circa 1882; 1891; 1901; ongoing alterations through the 1990s

Existing Feature and Condition:Building 25

The east and west penthouses at the seventh floor level are separated by a bituminous roof in poor condition. Both penthouse roofs are also bituminous and in poor condition. The east penthouse has a small one-story stair head house of clay tile construction in poor condition. The roof of the west penthouse is accessed by an open stair at its east wall. Centered on the roof of the west penthouse is a polygonal capped flue for the malt drying kilns.

Building 24

The roof of the north head house and the roof the rear one-story clay tile room at the seventh level are bituminous and in poor condition. Above the interstitial space between Building 24 and Building 25 are mounted large air handlers and mechanical equipment which extend above the roofline.

Work and Impact on Feature:Building 25

The deteriorated stair head house on the east penthouse and the furnace vent on the west penthouse will be removed. New membrane roofing will be installed on all existing and new roof areas. More detailed information on the size and location of new rooftop mechanical equipment will be provided for review and approval before construction.



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