WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 26 |

«AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS BY JULES VERNE TRANSLATED BY GEORGE MAKEPEACE TOWLE 7^WYS`f7Taa]e f7 COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Book: Around the World ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

AROUND THE WORLD

IN EIGHTY DAYS

BY

JULES VERNE

TRANSLATED BY

GEORGE MAKEPEACE TOWLE

7^WYS`f7Taa]e

f7

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

Book: Around the World in Eighty Days

Author: Jules Verne, 1828–1905

Translator: George Makepeace Towle, 1841–1893

First published: 1873

This ebook contains the text of George Towle’s English translation of Le Tour du Monde en Quatre-Vingts Jours. (A few errors have been corrected and are marked by footnotes signed “J.M.”) The original book is in the public domain in the United States and in most, if not all, other countries as well. Readers outside the United States should check their own countries’ copyright laws to be certain they can legally download this ebook. The Online Books Page has an FAQ which gives a summary of copyright durations for many other countries, as well as links to more official sources.

This PDF ebook was created by José Menéndez.

CONTENTS I. In which Phileas Fogg and Passepartout accept each other, the one as master, the other as man II. In which Passepartout is convinced that he has at last found his ideal III. In which a conversation takes place which seems likely to cost Phileas Fogg dear IV. In which Phileas Fogg astounds Passepartout, his servant V. In which a new species of funds, unknown to the moneyed men, appears on ’Change VI. In which Fix, the detective, betrays a very natural impatience VII. Which once more demonstrates the uselessness of passports as aids to detectives VIII. In which Passepartout talks rather more, perhaps, than is prudent IX. In which the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean prove propitious to the designs of Phileas Fogg X. In which Passepartout is only too glad to get off with the loss of his shoes XI. In which Phileas Fogg secures a curious means of conveyance at a fabulous price XII. In which Phileas Fogg and his companions venture across the Indian forests, and what ensued XIII. In which Passepartout receives a new proof that fortune favours the brave XIV. In which Phileas Fogg descends the whole length of the beautiful valley of the Ganges without ever thinking of seeing it XV. In which the bag of bank-notes disgorges some thousands of pounds more XVI. In which Fix does not seem to understand in the least what is said to him XVII. Showing what happened on the voyage from Singapore to Hong Kong XVIII. In which Phileas Fogg, Passepartout, and Fix go each about his business XIX. In which Passepartout takes a too great interest in his master, and what comes of it XX. In which Fix comes face to face with Phileas Fogg XXI. In which the master of the Tankadere runs great risk oflosing a reward of two hundred pounds XXII. In which Passepartout finds out that, even at the antipodes, it is convenient to have some money in one’s pocket XXIII. In which Passepartout’s nose becomes outrageously long XXIV. During which Mr. Fogg and party cross the Pacific Ocean XXV. In which a slight glimpse is had of San Francisco XXVI. In which Phileas Fogg and party travel by the Pacific Railroad XXVII. In which Passepartout undergoes, at a speed of twenty miles an hour, a course of Mormon history XXVIII. In which Passepartout does not succeed in making anybody listen to reason XXIX. In which certain incidents are narrated which are only to be met with on American railroads XXX. In which Phileas Fogg simply does his duty XXXI. In which Fix the detective considerably furthers the interests of Phileas Fogg XXXII. In which Phileas Fogg engages in a direct struggle with bad fortune XXXIII. In which Phileas Fogg shows himself equal to the occasion XXXIV. In which Phileas Fogg at last reaches London XXXV. In which Phileas Fogg does not have to repeat his orders to Passepartout twice XXXVI. In which Phileas Fogg’s name is once more at a premium on ’Change XXXVII. In which it is shown that Phileas Fogg gained nothing by his tour around the world, unless it were happiness

CHAPTER I

In which Phileas Fogg and Passepartout accept each other, the one as master, the other as man M R. PHILEAS FOGG lived, in 1872, at No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814. He was one of the most noticeable members of the Reform Club, though he seemed always to avoid attracting attention; an enigmatical personage, about whom little was known, except that he was a polished man of the world. People said that he resembled Byron,—at least that his head was Byronic; but he was a bearded, tranquil Byron, who might live on a thousand years without growing old.

Certainly an Englishman, it was more doubtful whether Phileas Fogg was a Londoner. He was never seen on ’Change, nor at the Bank, nor in the counting-rooms of the “City;” no ships ever came into London docks of which he was the owner; he had no public employment; he had never been entered at any of the Inns of Court, either at the Temple, or Lincoln’s Inn, or Gray’s Inn; nor had his voice ever resounded in the Court of Chancery, or in the Exchequer, or the Queen’s Bench, or the Ecclesiastical Courts. He certainly was not a manufacturer; nor was he a merchant or a gentleman farmer. His name was strange to the scientific and learned societies, and he never was known to take part in the sage deliberations of the Royal Institution or the London Institution, the Artisan’s Association or the Institution of Arts and Sciences. He belonged, in fact, to none of the numerous societies which swarm in the English capital, from the Harmonic to that of the Entomologists, founded mainly for the purpose of abolishing pernicious insects.





Phileas Fogg was a member of the Reform, and that was all.

The way in which he got admission to this exclusive club was simple enough.

He was recommended by the Barings, with whom he had an open credit. His checks were regularly paid at sight from his account current, which was always flush.

Was Phileas Fogg rich? Undoubtedly. But those who knew him best could not imagine how he had made his fortune, and Mr. Fogg was the last person to whom to apply for the information. He was not lavish, nor, on the contrary, avaricious; for whenever he knew that money was needed for a noble, useful, or benevolent purpose, he supplied it quickly, and sometimes anonymously. He was, in short, the least communicative of men. He talked very little, and seemed all the more mysterious for his taciturn manner. His daily habits were quite open to observation; but whatever he did was so exactly the same thing that he had always done before, that the wits of the curious were fairly puzzled.

Had he travelled? It was likely, for no one seemed to know the world more familiarly; there was no spot so secluded that he did not appear to have an intimate acquaintance with it. He often corrected, with a few clear words, the thousand conjectures advanced by members of the club as to lost and unheard-of travellers, pointing out the true probabilities, and seeming as if gifted with a sort of second sight, so often did events justify his predictions. He must have travelled everywhere, at least in the spirit.

It was at least certain that Phileas Fogg had not absented himself from London for many years. Those who were honoured by a better acquaintance with him than the rest, declared that nobody could pretend to have ever seen him anywhere else. His sole pastimes were reading the papers and playing whist. He often won at this game, which, as a silent one, harmonized with his nature; but his winnings never went into his purse, being reserved as a fund for his charities. Mr. Fogg played, not to win, but for the sake of playing. The game was in his eyes a contest, a struggle with a difficulty, yet a motionless, unwearying struggle, congenial to his tastes.

Phileas Fogg was not known to have either wife or children, which may happen to the most honest people;

either relatives or near friends, which is certainly more unusual. He lived alone in his house in Saville Row, whither none penetrated. A single domestic sufficed to serve him. He breakfasted and dined at the club, at hours mathematically fixed, in the same room, at the same table, never taking his meals with other members, much less bringing a guest with him; and went home at exactly midnight, only to retire at once to bed. He never used the cosy chambers which the Reform provides for its favoured members. He passed ten hours out of the twenty-four in Saville Row, either in sleeping or making his toilet. When he chose to take a walk, it was with a regular step in the entrance hall with its mosaic flooring, or in the circular gallery with its dome supported by twenty red porphyry Ionic columns, and illumined by blue painted windows. When he breakfasted or dined, all the resources of the club—its kitchens and pantries, its buttery and dairy—aided to crowd his table with their most succulent stores; he was served by the gravest waiters, in dress coats, and shoes with swan-skin soles, who proffered the viands in special porcelain, and on the finest linen; club decanters, of a lost mould, contained his sherry, his port, and his cinnamon-spiced claret; while his beverages were refreshingly cooled with ice, brought at great cost from the American lakes.

If to live in this style is to be eccentric, it must be confessed that there is something good in eccentricity!

The mansion in Saville Row, though not sumptuous, was exceedingly comfortable. The habits of its occupant were such as to demand but little from the sole domestic; but Phileas Fogg required him to be almost superhumanly prompt and regular. On this very 2nd of October he had dismissed James Forster, because that luckless youth had brought him shaving-water at eighty-four degrees Fahrenheit instead of eighty-six; and he was awaiting his successor, who was due at the house between eleven and half-past.

Phileas Fogg was seated squarely in his arm-chair, his feet close together like those of a grenadier on parade, his hands resting on his knees, his body straight, his head erect;

he was steadily watching a complicated clock which indicated the hours, the minutes, the seconds, the days, the months, and the years. At exactly half-past eleven Mr. Fogg would, according to his daily habit, quit Saville Row, and repair to the Reform.

A rap at this moment sounded on the door of the cosy apartment where Phileas Fogg was seated, and James Forster, the dismissed servant, appeared.

“The new servant,” said he.

A young man of thirty advanced and bowed.

“You are a Frenchman, I believe,” asked Phileas Fogg, “and your name is John?” “Jean, if monsieur pleases,” replied the new-comer, “Jean Passepartout, a surname which has clung to me because I have a natural aptness for going out of one business into another. I believe I’m honest, monsieur, but, to be outspoken, I’ve had several trades. I’ve been an itinerant singer, a circus-rider, when I used to vault like Leotard, and dance on a rope like Blondin. Then I got to be a professor of gymnastics, so as to make better use of my talents; and then I was a sergeant fireman at Paris, and assisted at many a big fire. But I quitted France five years ago, and, wishing to taste the sweets of domestic life, took service as a valet here in England. Finding myself out of place, and hearing that Monsieur Phileas Fogg was the most exact and settled gentleman in the United Kingdom, I have come to monsieur in the hope of living with him a tranquil life, and forgetting even the name of Passepartout.” “Passepartout suits me,” responded Mr. Fogg. “You are well recommended to me; I hear a good report of you. You know my conditions?” “Yes, monsieur.” “Good. What time is it?” “Twenty-two minutes after eleven,” returned Passepartout, drawing an enormous silver watch from the depths of his pocket.

“You are too slow,” said Mr. Fogg.

“Pardon me, monsieur, it is impossible—” “You are four minutes too slow. No matter; it’s enough to mention the error. Now from this moment, twenty-nine minutes after eleven, a.m., this Wednesday, October 2nd, you are in my service.” Phileas Fogg got up, took his hat in his left hand, put it on his head with an automatic motion, and went off without a word.

Passepartout heard the street door shut once; it was his new master going out. He heard it shut again; it was his predecessor, James Forster, departing in his turn.

Passepartout remained alone in the house in Saville Row.

CHAPTER II

In which Passepartout is convinced that he has at last found his ideal “ F AITH,” muttered Passepartout, somewhat flurried, “I’ve seen people at Madame Tussaud’s as lively as my new master!” Madame Tussaud’s “people,” let it be said, are of wax, and are much visited in London; speech is all that is wanting to make them human.

During his brief interview with Mr. Fogg, Passepartout had been carefully observing him. He appeared to be a man about forty years of age, with fine, handsome features, and a tall, well-shaped figure; his hair and whiskers were light, his forehead compact and unwrinkled, his face rather pale, his teeth magnificent. His countenance possessed in the highest degree what physiognomists call “repose in action,” a quality of those who act rather than talk. Calm and phlegmatic, with a clear eye, Mr. Fogg seemed a perfect type of that English composure which Angelica Kauffmann has so skilfully represented on canvas. Seen in the various phases of his daily life, he gave the idea of being perfectly well-balanced, as exactly regulated as a Leroy chronometer. Phileas Fogg was, indeed, exactitude personified, and this was betrayed even in the expression of his very hands and feet; for in men, as well as in animals, the limbs themselves are expressive of the passions.

He was so exact that he was never in a hurry, was always ready, and was economical alike of his steps and his motions. He never took one step too many, and always went to his destination by the shortest cut; he made no superfluous gestures, and was never seen to be moved or agitated. He was the most deliberate person in the world, yet always reached his destination at the exact moment.

He lived alone, and so to speak, outside of every social relation; and as he knew that in this world account must be taken of friction, and that friction retards, he never rubbed against anybody.

As for Passepartout, he was a true Parisian of Paris.



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 26 |


Similar works:

«THE AMENDMENT OF THE THREE STRIKES SENTENCING LAW J. RICHARD COUZENS Judge of the Superior Court County of Placer (Ret.) TRICIA A. BIGELOW Presiding Justice, Court of Appeal, 2nd Appellate District, Div. 8 May 2016 1 Rev. 5/16 New to This Edition The previously posted version of this memo was dated February 2015. This May 2016 version includes technical, non-substantive changes and the following updates: Page 8 – Smith – no retroactive application of Prop 36 Page 12 – Caraballo –...»

«BPMN 2.0 Handbook Second Edition Digital Edition © Extracted with permission from BPMN 2.0 Handbook Second Edition 2012 Full International Copyright. Published by Future Strategies Inc. USA www.FutStrat.com COPYRIGHT INFORMATION © Future Strategies Inc. This book is published in digital format. The content of this book is fully copyrighted under international copyright law and may not be distributed or data extracted therefrom without written permission by the publisher, Future Strategies...»

«The Beginner Landlord’s Guide to Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMO) Overview A House in Multiple Occupation (HMO) essentially refers to a property that is rented out to a number of tenants who ‘do not form a single household’. The Residential Landlords’ Association (RLA) goes some way to clear up exactly what constitutes a HMO and we’ll look at this in more detail in the legal section of this guide, but for now let’s say that it could be any form of accommodation from: •...»

«Issue RB267 – 23 05 15 Issue 190 – 23 June 2015 Welcome to the Weekly Regional Bulletin which is issued every Tuesday and designed to make sure staff have regular access to all key Trust information in one place. If any staff members have any comments or feedback they would like to share with the team, please feel free to get in touch by emailing: nwas.communications@nwas.nhs.uk.NWAS PARAMEDIC RECEIVES QUEEN’S HONOUR Paramedic, Frederick Lawrence is amongst the most recent recipients of...»

«International Journal of Applied Linguistics & English Literature ISSN 2200-3592 (Print), ISSN 2200-3452 (Online) Vol. 2 No. 4; July 2013 Copyright © Australian International Academic Centre, Australia A Stylistic Analysis of D.H. Lawrence’s ‘Sons and Lovers’ Nozar Niazi English Department, Lorestan University, Khorramabad-Iran E-mail: nozar_2002@yahoo.co.in Received: 04-04-2013 Accepted: 14-05-2013 Published: 01-07-2013 doi:10.7575/aiac.ijalel.v.2n.4p.118 URL:...»

«Minorities, Cultural Rights and the Protection of Intangible Cultural Heritage Ana Filipa Vrdoljak∗ 1 Introduction The protection of intangible cultural heritage has often been regarded as the long neglected area of international cultural heritage law. Indeed, while international conventions for the protection of movable and immovable, tangible heritage have been operational for several decades, a specialist multilateral instrument covering intangible heritage was only finalised in 2003. Yet,...»

«SUPERIOR DONUTS TRACY LETTS BY * * DRAMATISTS PLAY SERVICE INC. SUPERIOR DONUTS Copyright © 2010, Tracy Letts All Rights Reserved CAUTION: Professionals and amateurs ace hereby warned that performance of SUPERJOR DONUTS is subject to payment of a royalty. It is fully protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America, and of all countries covered by the International Copyright Union (including the Dominion of Canada and the rest of the British Commonwealth), and of all...»

«LAW REVIEW OCTOBER 1990 INSECT STING & BITE LIABILITY: A LIMITED DUTY FOR LANDOWNERS James C. Kozlowski, J.D., Ph.D. © 1990 James C. Kozlowski The Killer Bees are Coming! In recent times, aggressive hybrid bees have been moving northward and now pose a threat to livestock, pets and human beings along our southern border. These bees are expected to continue their northerly migration. In addition, there is growing awareness and concern over ticks in wooded areas which carry Lyme disease. These...»

«The State of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Program As Amended LEGAL COUNSEL GOLDMAN Law Offices 681 Smith Street Providence, RI 02908 This document replaces Chapters 1 through 5 of the program adopted by the Coastal Resources Management Council in 1977. Other adopted elements of the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Program include the Energy Amendments of 1979, Management Procedures, Right-of-Ways to the Shore, Special Area Management Plans for selected areas, and the...»

«Encouraging Insurers to Regulate: The Role (If Any) for Tort Law Kyle D. Logue University of Michigan Law School Abstract Insurance companies are financially responsible for a substantial portion of the losses associated with many risky activities, and those losses get mostly distributed among participating insureds through the premiums that are charged. The more they can lower the risks posed by their insureds, the more competitively they can price their policies, and the more customers they...»

«PREACHING the WORD THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT The MESSAGE of the KINGDOM R. KENT HUGHES The Sermon on the Mount Copyright © 2001 by R. Kent Hughes Published by Crossway 1300 Crescent Street Wheaton, Illinois 60187 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher, except as provided for by USA copyright...»

«C/SCA/15825/2012 JUDGMENT IN THE HIGH COURT OF GUJARAT AT AHMEDABAD SPECIAL CIVIL APPLICATION NO. 15825 of 2012 FOR APPROVAL AND SIGNATURE: HONOURABLE MR.JUSTICE AKIL KURESHI and HONOURABLE MS JUSTICE SONIA GOKANI ================================================================ 1 Whether Reporters of Local Papers may be allowed to see the judgment ? 2 To be referred to the Reporter or not ? 3 Whether their Lordships wish to see the fair copy of the judgment ? 4 Whether this case involves a...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.