WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 26 |

«AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS BY JULES VERNE TRANSLATED BY GEORGE MAKEPEACE TOWLE 7^WYS`f7Taa]e f7 COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Book: Around the World ...»

-- [ Page 3 ] --

“But, Mr. Fogg, eighty days are only the estimate of the least possible time in which the journey can be made.” “A well-used minimum suffices for everything.” “But, in order not to exceed it, you must jump mathematically from the trains upon the steamers, and from the steamers upon the trains again.” “I will jump—mathematically.” “You are joking.” “A true Englishman doesn’t joke when he is talking about so serious a thing as a wager,” replied Phileas Fogg, solemnly. “I will bet twenty thousand pounds against any one who wishes that I will make the tour of the world in eighty days or less; in nineteen hundred and twenty hours, or a hundred and fifteen thousand two hundred minutes. Do you accept?” “We accept,” replied Messrs. Stuart, Fallentin, Sullivan, Flanagan, and Ralph, after consulting each other.

“Good,” said Mr. Fogg. “The train leaves for Dover at a quarter before nine. I will take it.” “This very evening?” asked Stuart.

“This very evening,” returned Phileas Fogg. He took out and consulted a pocket almanac, and added, “As today is Wednesday, the second of October, I shall be due in London, in this very room of the Reform Club, on Saturday, the twenty-first of December, at a quarter before nine p.m.; or else the twenty thousand pounds, now deposited in my name at Baring’s, will belong to you, in fact and in right, gentlemen. Here is a check for the amount.” A memorandum of the wager was at once drawn up and signed by the six parties, during which Phileas Fogg preserved a stoical composure. He certainly did not bet to win, and had only staked the twenty thousand pounds, half of his fortune, because he foresaw that he might have to expend the other half to carry out this difficult, not to say unattainable, project. As for his antagonists, they seemed much agitated; not so much by the value of their stake, as because they had some scruples about betting under conditions so difficult to their friend.

The clock struck seven, and the party offered to suspend the game so that Mr. Fogg might make his preparations for departure.

“I am quite ready now,” was his tranquil response.

“Diamonds are trumps: be so good as to play, gentlemen.”

CHAPTER IVIn which Phileas Fogg astounds Passepartout, his servant

H AVING won twenty guineas at whist, and taken leave of his friends, Phileas Fogg, at twenty-five minutes past seven, left the Reform Club.

Passepartout, who had conscientiously studied the programme of his duties, was more than surprised to see his master guilty of the inexactness of appearing at this unaccustomed hour; for, according to rule, he was not due in Saville Row until precisely midnight.

Mr. Fogg repaired to his bedroom, and called out, “Passepartout!” Passepartout did not reply. It could not be he who was called; it was not the right hour.

“Passepartout!” repeated Mr. Fogg, without raising his voice.

Passepartout made his appearance.

“I’ve called you twice,” observed his master.

“But it is not midnight,” responded the other, showing his watch.

“I know it; I don’t blame you. We start for Dover and Calais in ten minutes.” A puzzled grin overspread Passepartout’s round face;

clearly he had not comprehended his master.

“Monsieur is going to leave home?” “Yes,” returned Phileas Fogg. “We are going round the world.” Passepartout opened wide his eyes, raised his eyebrows, held up his hands, and seemed about to collapse, so overcome was he with stupefied astonishment.

“Round the world!” he murmured.

“In eighty days,” responded Mr. Fogg. “So we haven’t a moment to lose.” “But the trunks?” gasped Passepartout, unconsciously swaying his head from right to left.

“We’ll have no trunks; only a carpet-bag, with two shirts and three pairs of stockings for me, and the same for you. We’ll buy our clothes on the way. Bring down my mackintosh and travelling-cloak, and some stout shoes, though we shall do little walking. Make haste!” Passepartout tried to reply, but could not. He went out,

mounted to his own room, fell into a chair, and muttered:

“That’s good, that is! And I, who wanted to remain quiet!” He mechanically set about making the preparations for departure. Around the world in eighty days! Was his master a fool! Was this a joke, then? They were going to Dover;

good! To Calais; good again! After all, Passepartout, who had been away from France five years, would not be sorry to set foot on his native soil again. Perhaps they would go as far as Paris, and it would do his eyes good to see Paris once more. But surely a gentleman so chary of his steps would stop there; no doubt—but, then, it was none the less true that he was going away, this so domestic person hitherto!

By eight o’clock Passepartout had packed the modest carpet-bag, containing the wardrobes of his master and himself; then, still troubled in mind, he carefully shut the door of his room, and descended to Mr. Fogg.

Mr. Fogg was quite ready. Under his arm might have been observed a red-bound copy of Bradshaw’s Continental Railway Steam Transit and General Guide, with its timetables showing the arrival and departure of steamers and railways. He took the carpet-bag, opened it, and slipped into it a goodly roll of Bank of England notes, which would pass wherever he might go.





“You have forgotten nothing?” asked he.

“Nothing, monsieur.” “My mackintosh and cloak?” “Here they are.” “Good. Take this carpet-bag,” handing it to Passepartout.

“Take good care of it, for there are twenty thousand pounds in it.” Passepartout nearly dropped the bag, as if the twenty thousand pounds were in gold, and weighed him down.

Master and man then descended, the street-door was double-locked, and at the end of Saville Row they took a cab and drove rapidly to Charing Cross. The cab stopped before the railway station at twenty minutes past eight. Passepartout jumped off the box and followed his master, who, after paying the cabman, was about to enter the station, when a poor beggar-woman, with a child in her arms, her naked feet smeared with mud, her head covered with a wretched bonnet, from which hung a tattered feather, and her shoulders shrouded in a ragged shawl, approached, and mournfully asked for alms.

Mr. Fogg took out the twenty guineas he had just won at whist, and handed them to the beggar, saying, “Here, my good woman. I’m glad that I met you;” and passed on.

Passepartout had a moist sensation about the eyes; his master’s action touched his susceptible heart.

Two first-class tickets for Paris having been speedily purchased, Mr. Fogg was crossing the station to the train, when he perceived his five friends of the Reform.

“Well, gentlemen,” said he, “I’m off, you see; and if you will examine my passport when I get back, you will be able to judge whether I have accomplished the journey agreed upon.” “Oh, that would be quite unnecessary, Mr. Fogg,” said Ralph politely. “We will trust your word, as a gentleman of honour.” “You do not forget when you are due in London again?” asked Stuart.

“In eighty days; on Saturday, the 21st of December, 1872, at a quarter before nine p.m. Good-bye, gentlemen.” Phileas Fogg and his servant seated themselves in a first-class carriage at twenty minutes before nine; five minutes later the whistle screamed, and the train slowly glided out of the station.

The night was dark, and a fine, steady rain was falling.

Phileas Fogg, snugly ensconced in his corner, did not open his lips. Passepartout, not yet recovered from his stupefaction, clung mechanically to the carpet-bag, with its enormous treasure.

Just as the train was whirling through Sydenham, Passepartout suddenly uttered a cry of despair.

“What’s the matter?” asked Mr. Fogg.

“Alas! In my hurry—I—I forgot—” “What?” “To turn off the gas in my room!” “Very well, young man,” returned Mr. Fogg, coolly; “it will burn—at your expense.”

CHAPTER V

In which a new species of funds, unknown to the moneyed men, appears on ’Change P HILEAS FOGG rightly suspected that his departure from London would create a lively sensation at the West End. The news of the bet spread through the Reform Club, and afforded an exciting topic of conversation to its members. From the Club it soon got into the papers throughout England. The boasted “tour of the world” was talked about, disputed, argued with as much warmth as if the subject were another Alabama claim. Some took sides with Phileas Fogg, but the large majority shook their heads and declared against him; it was absurd, impossible, they declared, that the tour of the world could be made, except theoretically and on paper, in this minimum of time, and with the existing means of travelling. The Times, Standard, Morning Post, and Daily News, and twenty other highly respectable newspapers scouted Mr. Fogg’s project as madness; the Daily Telegraph alone hesitatingly supported him. People in general thought him a lunatic, and blamed his Reform Club friends for having accepted a wager which betrayed the mental aberration of its proposer.

Articles no less passionate than logical appeared on the question, for geography is one of the pet subjects of the English; and the columns devoted to Phileas Fogg’s venture were eagerly devoured by all classes of readers. At first some rash individuals, principally of the gentler sex, espoused his cause, which became still more popular when the Illustrated London News came out with his portrait, copied from a photograph in the Reform Club. A few readers of the Daily Telegraph even dared to say, “Why not, after all? Stranger things have come to pass.” At last a long article appeared, on the 7th of October, in the bulletin of the Royal Geographical Society, which treated the question from every point of view, and demonstrated the utter folly of the enterprise.

Everything, it said, was against the travellers, every obstacle imposed alike by man and by nature. A miraculous agreement of the times of departure and arrival, which was impossible, was absolutely necessary to his success. He might, perhaps, reckon on the arrival of trains at the designated hours, in Europe, where the distances were relatively moderate; but when he calculated upon crossing India in three days, and the United States in seven, could he rely beyond misgiving upon accomplishing his task? There were accidents to machinery, the liability of trains to run off the line, collisions, bad weather, the blocking up by snow,—were not all these against Phileas Fogg? Would he not find himself, when travelling by steamer in winter, at the mercy of the winds and fogs? Is it uncommon for the best ocean steamers to be two or three days behind time? But a single delay would suffice to fatally break the chain of communication;

should Phileas Fogg once miss, even by an hour; a steamer, he would have to wait for the next, and that would irrevocably render his attempt vain.

This article made a great deal of noise, and being copied into all the papers, seriously depressed the advocates of the rash tourist.

Everybody knows that England is the world of betting men, who are of a higher class than mere gamblers; to bet is in the English temperament. Not only the members of the Reform, but the general public, made heavy wagers for or against Phileas Fogg, who was set down in the betting books as if he were a race-horse. Bonds were issued, and made their appearance on ’Change; “Phileas Fogg bonds” were offered at par or at a premium, and a great business was done in them. But five days after the article in the bulletin of the Geographical Society appeared, the demand began to subside: “Phileas Fogg” declined. They were offered by packages, at first of five, then of ten, until at last nobody would take less than twenty, fifty, a hundred!

Lord Albemarle, an elderly paralytic gentleman, was now the only advocate of Phileas Fogg left. This noble lord, who was fastened to his chair, would have given his fortune to be able to make the tour of the world, if it took ten years;

and he bet five thousand pounds on Phileas Fogg. When the folly as well as the uselessness of the adventure was pointed out to him, he contented himself with replying, “If the thing is feasible, the first to do it ought to be an Englishman.” The Fogg party dwindled more and more, everybody was going against him, and the bets stood a hundred and fifty and two hundred to one; and a week after his departure, an incident occurred which deprived him of backers at any price.

The commissioner of police was sitting in his office at nine o’clock one evening, when the following telegraphic despatch was put into his hands:—

–  –  –

The effect of this despatch was instantaneous. The polished gentleman disappeared to give place to the bank robber. His photograph, which was hung with those of the rest of the members at the Reform Club, was minutely examined, and it betrayed, feature by feature, the description of the robber which had been provided to the police. The mysterious habits of Phileas Fogg were recalled; his solitary ways, his sudden departure; and it seemed clear that, in undertaking a tour round the world on the pretext of a wager, he had had no other end in view than to elude the detectives, and throw them off his track.

CHAPTER VI

In which Fix, the detective, betrays a very natural impatience T HE circumstances under which this telegraphic despatch about Phileas Fogg was sent were as follows:— The steamer Mongolia, belonging to the Peninsular and Oriental Company, built of iron, of two thousand eight hundred tons burden, and five hundred horse-power, was due at eleven o’clock a.m. on Wednesday, the 9th of October, at Suez. The Mongolia plied regularly between Brindisi and Bombay via the Suez Canal, and was one of the fastest steamers belonging to the company, always making more than ten knots an hour between Brindisi and Suez, and nine and a half between Suez and Bombay.



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 26 |


Similar works:

«ETHICS IN LITIGATION AND COURT PROCEEDINGS BY STEVE MARK NSW LEGAL SERVICES COMMISSIONER AUSTRALIAN YOUNG LAWYERS STREAM 36TH AUSTRALIAN LEGAL CONVENTION FRIDAY 18TH SEPTEMBER 2009 In the period June 2007 to July 2008, the OLSC received over 400 complaints about the conduct of legal practitioners in court proceedings. 1 The purpose of this paper is to provide a general discussion and refresher of some of the ethical duties of legal practitioners in litigation and court proceedings. The first...»

«Crime Markets Does Truthcoin condemn us to a lawless plutocracy? Paul Sztorc truthcoin@gmail.com Version 1.0 November 30th, 20131 Summary Some worry that censorship-resistant prediction markets will be used to encourage assassinations (and other crimes); this concern does not hold up to a sober examination. “Assassination markets” (AMs), as originally proposed by Jim Bell, are irreconcilably different from Prediction Markets (PMs). My experimental method for funding public goods with PMs...»

«Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies Annual Report 2013 Table of Contents Director’s Report 1 About the Centre 2 Centre Members 3-9 Advisory Board 9 Visitors to the Centre 10 CCCS Graduate Research Students 11 Events 12-20 Funded Research Grants 21-22 Publications 23-24 Appendix 25-26 www.law.unimelb.edu.au/cccs CCCS Annual Report 2013 Director’s Report Activities The CCCS year was marked by three important symposia in February, March, June and December. The first was a new kind of...»

«Joseph K. Young October 14, 2016 Joseph K. Young Curriculum Vitae Contact Information American University Phone: 202.885.2618 School of Public Affairs Fax: 202.885.2353 Department of Justice, Law & Society Office: 247 Ward Circle Building 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Email: jyoung@american.edu Washington, DC 20016-8043 URL: http://nw18.american.edu/~jyoung/ Academic Appointments American University, Washington, DC Chair, Justice, Law & Criminology, Fall 2015 present Associate Professor,...»

«INTERNATIONAL PATENT LAW: COOPERATION, HARMONIZATION AND AN INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS OF WIPO AND THE WTO by Alexander James Stack A thesis submitted in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Juridical Science Graduate Department of the Faculty of Law University of Toronto © Copyright by Alexander James Stack 2008 INTERNATIONAL PATENT LAW: COOPERATION, HARMONIZATION AND AN INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS OF WIPO AND THE WTO by Alexander James Stack A thesis submitted in conformity...»

«An Interview with Mike Kendall Mike Kendall, Partner, Goodwin Procter LLP, speaks with Growthink University’s Dave Lavinsky Dave Lavinsky: Hello everyone. Dave Lavinsky here from Growthink and today I’m really excited to be able to interview Mike Kendall. Mike is a partner at Goodwin and Procter which is a top tier law firm which has offices all over the United States and around the world. Mike represents leading private equity and venture capital firms in early and later stage investments....»

«Atomistic Simulation and Electronic Structure of Lithium Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability Justin B. Haskins,† Charles W. Bauschlicher, Jr.,‡ and John W. Lawson∗, ERC Inc., Thermal Materials Protection Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035, USA, Entry Systems and Technology Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035, USA, and Thermal Materials Protection Branch, NASA Ames Research Center,...»

«CITY COUNCIL, CITY OF ROCKFORD JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS APRIL 27, 2009 COUNCIL CONVENED AT 6:23 P.M.1. The invocation was given by Father Ron Montanye, St. Sebastain Orthodox Catholic Church/Police Chaplain and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Council Page Shanice Smith.2. Roll Call: Mayor Lawrence J. Morrissey Aldermen: Sosnowski, Curran. Mark, Wasco, Thompson-Kelly, Johnson, Timm, Beach, Holt, Beck, McNeely, Conness -12Absent: Bell, Jacobson-23. Alderman Mark moved to accept the Journal of...»

«Statement of Paul R. Gugliuzza Associate Professor of Law Boston University School of Law Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade U.S. House of Representatives Hearing: “Update: Patent Demand Letter Practices and Solutions” February 26, 2015 Introduction Chairman Burgess, Ranking Member Schakowsky, and Members of the Subcommittee: Thank you for inviting me to testify. My name is Paul Gugliuzza. I am an associate professor of law at Boston...»

«Vitaly Chernetsky Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Kansas 2140 Wescoe Hall, 1445 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence, KS 66045-7594 E-mail: vchernetsky@ku.edu ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2013–– Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Kansas 2010—2013 Director, Film Studies Program, Miami University 2006—2013 Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, Miami University: Assistant Professor 2006–2010; tenured and promoted...»

«The Yacht Harbour Association Stornoway Port Authority Berthing, Mooring and/or Storage Ashore Licence Signature of this Licence by the Company and the Owner creates a legally binding contract for Berthing, Mooring and/or Storage Ashore at the yacht harbour, marina, boat yard, mooring or any other facility for launching, navigating, mooring or berthing a vessel operated by the Company subject to The Yacht Harbour Association Berthing, Mooring and/or Storage Ashore Licence Standard Terms and...»

«Muhammad Goes to Hollywood: Michael Mann’s Ali as Biopic KEGAN DOYLE ALI’S AMERICAN LIFE HAS HAD MANY ACTS, NOT ALL OF M UHAMMAD them pretty. The Ali our culture least wants to remember is the Ali of the late 1970s and early 1980s, a diminished champion engaging in mediocre fights against Leon Spinks and Jimmy Young and tragic ones against Larry Holmes and Trevor Berbick. Ali’s later victories were not spectacular displays of fistic virtuosity or underdog miracles that knocked the world...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.