WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 4 | 5 || 7 | 8 |   ...   | 26 |

«AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS BY JULES VERNE TRANSLATED BY GEORGE MAKEPEACE TOWLE 7^WYS`f7Taa]e f7 COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Book: Around the World ...»

-- [ Page 6 ] --

Formerly one was obliged to travel in India by the old cumbrous methods of going on foot or on horseback, in palanquins or unwieldy coaches; now, fast steamboats ply on the Indus and the Ganges, and a great railway, with branch lines joining the main line at many points on its route, traverses the peninsula from Bombay to Calcutta in three days. This railway does not run in a direct line across India.

The distance between Bombay and Calcutta, as the bird flies, is only from one thousand to eleven hundred miles; but the deflections of the road increase this distance by more than a third.

The general route of the Great Indian Peninsular Railway is as follows:—Leaving Bombay, it passes through Salcette, crossing to the continent opposite Tannah, goes over the chain of the Western Ghauts, runs thence north-east as far as Burhampoor, skirts the nearly independent territory of Bundelcund, ascends to Allahabad, turns thence eastwardly, meeting the Ganges at Benares, then departs from the river a little, and, descending south-eastward by Burdivan and the French town of Chandernagor, has its terminus at Calcutta.

The passengers of the Mongolia went ashore at halfpast four p.m.; at exactly eight the train would start for Calcutta.

Mr. Fogg, after bidding good-bye to his whist partners, left the steamer, gave his servant several errands to do, urged it upon him to be at the station promptly at eight, and, with his regular step, which beat to the second, like an astronomical clock, directed his steps to the passport office.

As for the wonders of Bombay—its famous city hall, its splendid library, its forts and docks, its bazaars, mosques, synagogues, its Armenian churches, and the noble pagoda on Malabar Hill with its two polygonal towers—he cared not a straw to see them. He would not deign to examine even the masterpieces of Elephanta, or the mysterious hypogea, concealed south-east from the docks, or those fine remains of Buddhist architecture, the Kanherian grottoes of the island of Salcette.

Having transacted his business at the passport office, Phileas Fogg repaired quietly to the railway station, where he ordered dinner. Among the dishes served up to him, the landlord especially recommended a certain giblet of “native rabbit,” on which he prided himself.

Mr. Fogg accordingly tasted the dish, but, despite its spiced sauce, found it far from palatable. He rang for the landlord, and on his appearance, said, fixing his clear eyes upon him, “Is this rabbit, sir?” “Yes, my lord,” the rogue boldly replied, “rabbit from the jungles.” “And this rabbit did not mew when he was killed?” “Mew, my lord! what, a rabbit mew! I swear to you—” “Be so good, landlord, as not to swear, but remember this: cats were formerly considered, in India, as sacred animals. That was a good time.” “For the cats, my lord?” “Perhaps for the travellers as well!” After which Mr. Fogg quietly continued his dinner. Fix had gone on shore shortly after Mr. Fogg, and his first destination was the headquarters of the Bombay police. He made himself known as a London detective, told his business at Bombay, and the position of affairs relative to the supposed robber, and nervously asked if a warrant had arrived from London. It had not reached the office; indeed, there had not yet been time for it to arrive. Fix was sorely disappointed, and tried to obtain an order of arrest from the director of the Bombay police. This the director refused, as the matter concerned the London office, which alone could legally deliver the warrant. Fix did not insist, and was fain to resign himself to await the arrival of the important document; but he was determined not to lose sight of the mysterious rogue as long as he stayed in Bombay. He did not doubt for a moment, any more than Passepartout, that Phileas Fogg would remain there, at least until it was time for the warrant to arrive.

Passepartout, however, had no sooner heard his master’s orders on leaving the Mongolia, than he saw at once that they were to leave Bombay as they had done Suez and Paris, and that the journey would be extended at least as far as Calcutta, and perhaps beyond that place. He began to ask himself if this bet that Mr. Fogg talked about was not really in good earnest, and whether his fate was not in truth forcing him, despite his love of repose, around the world in eighty days!

Having purchased the usual quota of shirts and shoes, he took a leisurely promenade about the streets, where crowds of people of many nationalities—Europeans, Persians with pointed caps, Banyans with round turbans, Sindis with square bonnets, Parsees with black mitres, and long-robed Armenians—were collected. It happened to be the day of a Parsee festival. These descendants of the sect of Zoroaster—the most thrifty, civilized, intelligent, and austere of the East Indians, among whom are counted the richest native merchants of Bombay—were celebrating a sort of religious carnival, with processions and shows, in the midst of which Indian dancing-girls, clothed in rose-coloured gauze, looped up with gold and silver, danced airily, but with perfect modesty, to the sound of viols and the clanging of tambourines. It is needless to say that Passepartout watched these curious ceremonies with staring eyes and gaping mouth, and that his countenance was that of the greenest booby imaginable.

Unhappily for his master, as well as himself, his curiosity drew him unconsciously farther off than he intended to go.





At last, having seen the Parsee carnival wind away in the distance, he was turning his steps towards the station, when he happened to espy the splendid pagoda on Malabar Hill, and was seized with an irresistible desire to see its interior.

He was quite ignorant that it is forbidden to Christians to enter certain Indian temples, and that even the faithful must not go in without first leaving their shoes outside the door. It may be said here that the wise policy of the British Government severely punishes a disregard of the practices of the native religions.

Passepartout, however, thinking no harm, went in like a simple tourist, and was soon lost in admiration of the splendid Brahmin ornamentation which everywhere met his eyes, when of a sudden he found himself sprawling on the sacred flagging. He looked up to behold three enraged priests, who forthwith fell upon him, tore off his shoes, and began to beat him with loud, savage exclamations. The agile Frenchman was soon upon his feet again, and lost no time in knocking down two of his long-gowned adversaries with his fists and a vigorous application of his toes; then, rushing out of the pagoda as fast as his legs could carry him, he soon escaped the third priest by mingling with the crowd in the streets.

At five minutes before eight, Passepartout, hatless, shoeless, and having in the squabble lost his package of shirts and shoes, rushed breathlessly into the station.

Fix, who had followed Mr. Fogg to the station, and saw that he was really going to leave Bombay, was there, upon the platform. He had resolved to follow the supposed robber to Calcutta, and farther, if necessary. Passepartout did not observe the detective, who stood in an obscure corner; but Fix heard him relate his adventures in a few words to Mr.

Fogg.

“I hope that this will not happen again,” said Phileas Fogg, coldly, as he got into the train. Poor Passepartout, quite crestfallen, followed his master without a word. Fix was on the point of entering another carriage, when an idea struck him which induced him to alter his plan.

“No, I’ll stay,” muttered he. “An offence has been committed on Indian soil. I’ve got my man.” Just then the locomotive gave a sharp screech, and the train passed out into the darkness of the night.

CHAPTER XI

In which Phileas Fogg secures a curious means of conveyance at a fabulous price T HE train had started punctually. Among the passengers were a number of officers, Government officials, and opium and indigo merchants, whose business called them to the eastern coast. Passepartout rode in the same carriage with his master, and a third passenger occupied a seat opposite to them. This was Sir Francis Cromarty, one of Mr. Fogg’s whist partners on the Mongolia, now on his way to join his corps at Benares. Sir Francis was a tall, fair man of fifty, who had greatly distinguished himself in the last Sepoy revolt. He made India his home, only paying brief visits to England at rare intervals; and was almost as familiar as a native with the customs, history, and character of India and its people. But Phileas Fogg, who was not travelling, but only describing a circumference, took no pains to inquire into these subjects; he was a solid body, traversing an orbit around the terrestrial globe, according to the laws of rational mechanics. He was at this moment calculating in his mind the number of hours spent since his departure from London, and, had it been in his nature to make a useless demonstration, would have rubbed his hands for satisfaction.

Sir Francis Cromarty had observed the oddity of his travelling companion—although the only opportunity he had for studying him had been while he was dealing the cards, and between two rubbers—and questioned himself whether a human heart really beat beneath this cold exterior, and whether Phileas Fogg had any sense of the beauties of nature. The brigadier-general was free to mentally confess, that, of all the eccentric persons he had ever met, none was comparable to this product of the exact sciences.

Phileas Fogg had not concealed from Sir Francis his design of going round the world, nor the circumstances under which he set out; and the general only saw in the wager a useless eccentricity, and a lack of sound commonsense. In the way this strange gentleman was going on, he would leave the world without having done any good to himself or anybody else.

An hour after leaving Bombay the train had passed the viaducts and the island of Salcette, and had got into the open country. At Callyan they reached the junction of the branch line which descends towards south-eastern India by Kandallah and Pounah; and, passing Pauwell, they entered the defiles of the mountains, with their basalt bases, and their summits crowned with thick and verdant forests. Phileas Fogg and Sir Francis Cromarty exchanged a few words from time to time, and now Sir Francis, reviving the conversation, observed, “Some years ago, Mr. Fogg, you would have met with a delay at this point, which would probably have lost you your wager.” “How so, Sir Francis?” “Because the railway stopped at the base of these mountains, which the passengers were obliged to cross in palanquins or on ponies to Kandallah, on the other side.” “Such a delay would not have deranged my plans in the least,” said Mr. Fogg. “I have constantly foreseen the likelihood of certain obstacles.” “But, Mr. Fogg,” pursued Sir Francis, “you run the risk of having some difficulty about this worthy fellow’s adventure at the pagoda.” Passepartout, his feet comfortably wrapped in his travelling-blanket, was sound asleep, and did not dream that anybody was talking about him. “The Government is very severe upon that kind of offence. It takes particular care that the religious customs of the Indians should be respected, and if your servant were caught—” “Very well, Sir Francis,” replied Mr. Fogg; “if he had been caught he would have been condemned and punished, and then would have quietly returned to Europe. I don’t see how this affair could have delayed his master.” The conversation fell again. During the night the train left the mountains behind, and passed Nassik, and the next day proceeded over the flat, well-cultivated country of the Khandeish, with its straggling villages, above which rose the minarets of the pagodas. This fertile territory is watered by numerous small rivers and limpid streams, mostly tributaries of the Godavery.

Passepartout, on waking and looking out, could not realize that he was actually crossing India in a railway train.

The locomotive, guided by an English engineer and fed with English coal, threw out its smoke upon cotton, coffee, nutmeg, clove, and pepper plantations, while the steam curled in spirals around groups of palm-trees, in the midst of which were seen picturesque bungalows, viharis (a sort of abandoned monasteries), and marvellous temples enriched by the exhaustless ornamentation of Indian architecture.

Then they came upon vast tracts extending to the horizon, with jungles inhabited by snakes and tigers, which fled at the noise of the train; succeeded by forests penetrated by the railway, and still haunted by elephants which, with pensive eyes, gazed at the train as it passed. The travellers crossed, beyond Malligaum, the fatal country so often stained with blood by the sectaries of the goddess Kali. Not far off rose Ellora, with its graceful pagodas, and the famous Aurungabad, capital of the ferocious Aureng-Zeb, now the chief town of one of the detached provinces of the kingdom of the Nizam. It was thereabouts that Feringhea, the Thuggee chief, king of the stranglers, held his sway. These ruffians, united by a secret bond, strangled victims of every age in honour of the goddess Death, without ever shedding blood;

there was a period when this part of the country could scarcely be travelled over without corpses being found in every direction. The English Government has succeeded in greatly diminishing these murders, though the Thuggees still exist, and pursue the exercise of their horrible rites.

At half-past twelve the train stopped at Burhampoor, where Passepartout was able to purchase some Indian slippers, ornamented with false pearls, in which, with evident vanity, he proceeded to incase his feet. The travellers made a hasty breakfast, and started off for Assurghur, after skirting for a little the banks of the small river Tapty, which empties into the Gulf of Cambray, near Surat.

Passepartout was now plunged into absorbing reverie.



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 4 | 5 || 7 | 8 |   ...   | 26 |


Similar works:

«ECB-PUBLIC DANIÈLE NOUY Chair of the Supervisory Board Frankfurt am Main, 24 March 2016 Public guidance on the recognition of significant credit risk transfer To: The management of significant banks I. LEGAL BACKGROUND 1 According to Article 4(1)(d) of Council Regulation (EU) No 1024/2013 (‘SSM Regulation’), the ECB is to ensure compliance with the legal acts referred to in the first subparagraph of Article 4(3) of the SSM Regulation, which impose prudential requirements on credit...»

«Testimony before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs by Heidi Mandanis Schooner Professor of Law Columbus School of Law The Catholic University of America Washington, D.C. 20064 Hearing on “Bank Capital and Liquidity Regulation” June 7, 2016 Chairman Shelby, Ranking Member Brown, and members of the Committee, thank you for this opportunity to participate in today’s hearing on bank capital and liquidity regulation. In my testimony, I will make two central...»

«IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA MARY WELSCH : CIVIL ACTION : v. : No. 07-4578 :TOWNSHIP OF UPPER DARBY, et al. : MEMORANDUM AND ORDER Juan R. Sánchez, J. August 26, 2008 Defendants Investigator James R. Thrash, and Police Officers Thomas Fitzpatrick and Jerome Brown move for summary judgment arguing they lawfully searched and seized Plaintiff Mary Welsch’s firearms during their investigation of her father’s death from a gun shot. Defendants...»

«Cognitive correlates of adjustment for mothers and stepfathers in stepfather families. By: Lawrence A. Kurdek and Mark A. Fine Kurdek, L. A., & Fine, M. A. (1991). Cognitive correlates of adjustment for mothers and stepfathers in stepfather families. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 53(3), 565-572. Made available courtesy of Wiley-Blackwell. The definitive version is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741-3737 ***Reprinted with permission. No further...»

«J Indian Philos (2009) 37:1–43 DOI 10.1007/s10781-008-9059-3 Monks Who Have Sex: Parajika Penance in Indian ¯¯ Buddhist Monasticisms Shayne Clarke Published online: 4 December 2008 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008 Grant me chastity and continence, but not yet. Augustine of Hippo (354–430 C.E.) Abstract In the study of Buddhism it is commonly accepted that a monk or nun who commits a parajika offence is permanently and irrevocably expelled ¯¯ from the Buddhist monastic order....»

«Discovering God’s Will for Your Life By Ray Pritchard C R O S S W AY B O O K S A DIVISION OF GOOD NEWS PUBLISHERS WHEATON, ILLINOIS Discovering God’s Will for Your Life Adapted from part of The Road Best Traveled, copyright © 1995 by Ray Pritchard. Published by Crossway Books. Copyright © 2004 by Ray Pritchard Published by Crossway Books A division of Good News Publishers 1300 Crescent Street Wheaton, Illinois 60187 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,...»

«Research note The legal services market August 2011 Contents Executive Summary Introduction Purpose of the Document Regulatory Structure Limitations Background LSA and the regulators Reform of Regulatory Arrangements: Part 5 of the LSA 2007 Existing regulatory arrangements and outcome focused regulation. 11 Legal Disciplinary Practices – a step toward ABS? The Australian experience European Experience The England and Wales legal services markets Market trends One market or many? A demand...»

«MISAPPROPRIATION: A GENERAL THEORY OF LIABILITY FOR TRADING ON NONPUBLIC INFORMATION Barbara Bader Aldave* The more one ponders the reasoning in Chiarella v. United States' and Dirks v. SEC,2 the less one is satisfied with the Supreme Court's explanation of when and why Rule 10b-5 3 prohibits trading in securities on the basis of material nonpublic information. Chiarellaand Dirks establish that a person violates Rule lOb-5 by buying or selling securities on the basis of material nonpublic...»

«Announcement United States criminal in english 36 articles, created at 2016-09-06 20:33 1 5 things to know for September 6, 2016 1. Survivor in crash that killed 4 UGA students is speaking. 2016-09-06 20:32 800Bytes www.ajc.com (6.44/7) 2 Anjem Choudary – video profile Anjem Choudary, a prominent radical Islamist preacher, has been convicted at of supporting Islamic State sentenced to five and a half years in prison 2016-09-06 14:38 (5.29/7) 1KB www.theguardian.com 3 13 Killed, 52 Wounded In...»

«Copyright 1998 by the TriBar Opinion Committee. The TriBar Opinion Committee hereby grants permission for copies of the materials herein to be made, in whole or in part, for lawyers, law firms and law departments and for classroom use in an institution of higher learning and for use by not-for-profit organizations, provided in each case that the use (whether by a lawyer, law firm, law department, institution of higher learning or a non-profit organization) is for informational, non-commercial...»

«Product safety Children’s nightwear and paper patterns for children’s nightwear Supplier guide Australian Competition and Consumer Commission 23 Marcus Clarke Street, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, 2601 First published by the ACCC 2010 © Commonwealth of Australia 2011 This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted by the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced without prior written permission of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Requests and...»

«HOFFER.DOCX (DO NOT DELETE) 1/31/2014 2:04 PM MISREPRESENTATION: THE RESTATEMENT’S SECOND MISTAKE Stephanie R. Hoffer* The contract defenses of mistake and misrepresentation can be used to unravel deals as big as a corporate merger and as small as the sale of a used car. These two defenses, while conceptually distinct in theory, contain a significant amount of overlap in practice, causing courts to conflate the two legal standards. A misrepresentation of one party, when believed, results in a...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.