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«Action for the Rights of Children (ARC) Critical Issues Abuse and Exploitation CONTENTS BRIEFING NOTES FOR FACILITATORS Page Introduction Topic 1: ...»

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2. Devise a strategy for more detailed analysis of the problem and its wider

context. This strategy needs to include a statement about:

• what further information will be needed?

• who needs to be involved in examining the problem further?

• what methods and techniques will be used in analysing the situation?

3. On the basis of the limited information that is already available, brainstorm ideas on the kind of responses which might be developed.

Record your findings on a flip chart for presentation to the plenary session.

–  –  –

TARGET AUDIENCE

Sector Co-ordinators, Field Staff.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, participants will be able to:

• explain the importance of involving the local community, institutions and outside organisations in developing strategies for prevention;

• describe the different roles that each can play in developing an effective prevention strategy.

TIMEFRAME 60 minutes in groups 30 minutes large groups METHOD This exercise is to plan a campaign to increase community or camp residents’ awareness of the issues around the prevention of exploitation. The campaign should reflect the local situation and involve the local structures.

Put the participants in groups. If there are existing teams or logical groups that should work together use these, however if not then use random groups.

They are to plan a campaign to raise awareness, either in the local community or local organisations, as to what can be done to prevent exploitation. The campaign is to reflect the local situation and the resources available and must work through the local structures.

Each group is to have 10 minutes to present their campaign plan and allow up to 20 minutes to review the overall process and reinforce the key learning points.

Note: This exercise can be used as a follow up to Exercise 4.1 in which participants map out areas of risk within a camp

TARGET GROUP

Sector Co-ordinators, Field Staff.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, participants will be able to:

• develop a simple awareness campaign to raise general awareness of exploitation and wider child rights issues;

• devise strategies for informing local populations about the existence of various forms of exploitation.

TIMEFRAME 20 - 45 minutes in small groups 10 - 30 minutes feedback to large group METHOD The exercise can be used at the end of a workshop with any group. It is intended to consolidate the learning and provide a fun end to the session. The slogan may be able to be used in a camp or the community as part of a wider education programme.

Invite participants to work in groups of three to four people. Explain that the purpose is to create an appropriate slogan that can be used for a poster or T shirt campaign to increase awareness among the local community on how to help prevent exploitation and uphold children’s rights. Use the time you have available so that participants prepare the slogan and then share them with the large group.

If you have more time and suitable materials, then participants could create posters that could be used in the community/camp.

TARGET GROUP

Sector Co-ordinators, Field Staff.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, participants will be able to:

• explain the issues in developing a strategy for protecting refugee children;

• describe the process and methodology for involving the community in developing this strategy;

• develop an action plan for working with communities to protect their children from abuse and exploitation.

TIMEFRAME 20 - 45 minutes in small groups 10 - 30 minutes feedback to large group METHOD The protection of refugee children is most effective when undertaken with or by local communities; local communities are closest to families and often take responsibility for the protection of children in their villages/localities.

The purpose of this exercise is to create an action plan which outlines the issues and the processes that need to be considered when seeking to involve a community in a programme of intervention to address exploitation of children.

Ask the participants to work in small groups. Their task is to:

1. consider the issues that should be addressed in setting up a community led strategy for protecting refugee children from abuse and exploitation;

2. consider the process and the methodology of involving the community in developing this strategy;

3. devise an action plan which will be effective in protecting refugee children from abuse and exploitation in participants’ working environment.

The groups will come together and share the key points of each of their plans.

Ensure that they have covered the key points.

–  –  –

TARGET GROUP

Sector Co-ordinators, Field Staff.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, participants will be able to:

• identify which of a list of activities can be considered intervention strategies;





• identify which of these strategies is in operation in their area of work;

• determine ways in which these strategies might become more effective prevention strategies.

TIMEFRAME 45 minutes METHOD Brief introduction to participants using Briefing Notes for Topic 7, which details a number of possible intervention strategies.

Divide participants into small groups of people who are working in the same situation, if possible, and give each group a copy of the Participants’ Notes for this exercise.

Ask them to look through the list of activities described. Their task is to:

1. identify which of the activities cited are happening in their own working environment;

2. identify other activities which are taking place in their own working environment and which also act as intervention/prevention strategies for vulnerable children;

3. for each one of the activities cited above, participants should decide in which ways they are acting as intervention strategies and, in their opinion, how effective they are in prevention children from abuse and exploitation;

Ask participants to summarise their discussions on flip chart.

Plenary: short plenary to share key points to emerge from small group discussions.

–  –  –

If time permits, participants can be encouraged to consider ways in which some of the above strategies could become more effective in protecting vulnerable children from exploitation or abuse.

RESOURCES Copy of the Participants’ Notes for each participant.

Flip chart paper and marker pens.

–  –  –

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, participants will be able to:

• identify which of a list of activities can be considered intervention strategies;

• identify which of these strategies is in operation in your area of work;

• determine ways in which these strategies might become more effective prevention strategies.

TIMEFRAME 45 minutes METHOD Work in small groups of people who are working in the same situation.

Read through the list of activities described below and then:

1. identify which of the listed activities are happening in your own working environment;

2. identify other activities which are taking place in your own working environment and which also act as intervention/prevention strategies for vulnerable children;

3. for each one of the activities listed above, decide in which ways they are acting as intervention strategies and, in your opinion, how effective they are in preventing children from abuse and exploitation.

Summarise the main points of this discussion on a flip chart. There will be a plenary session in which you can share the key points to emerge from your discussions.

–  –  –

ACTIVITIES WHICH POTENTIALLY ADDRESS THE ISSUE OF EXPLOITED

CHILDREN

1. Printing and dissemination of information on children’s rights to authorities (national and international laws/instruments).

2. Awareness raising of possible exploitation i.e. round table seminars, mass media, interviews with local media.

3. Research/studies on exploitation in the region.

4. Establishment of education centres (including non-formal education) in camps or areas where children may be vulnerable.

5. Rehabilitation of schools/provision of equipment/books.

6. Material assistance for children (shoes, clothes, sporting/recreational equipment).

7. Tolerance education for children including information on their rights.

8. Income generation (e.g. micro-credits).

9. Adolescent/apprenticeship programmes.

10. Develop/foster women/children support NGOs.

11. Creation of women/children social/resource crisis centre.

12. Emergency accommodation at the border.

13. Life skills, language and reproductive health programmes.

14. Social, medical and financial assistance vulnerable groups.

15. Better parenting skills training.

–  –  –

16. Access to counsellors.

17. Summer camp.

18. Skills training for teachers in areas of refugee and IDPs.

19. Capacity building of border guards and law enforcement officials.

–  –  –

TARGET GROUP

Sector Co-ordinators, Field Staff.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, participants will be able to:

• describe the risks of children being sexually exploited in transit camps;

• explain the most effective ways of dealing with these situations;

• assess the usefulness of existing guidelines and policies in these circumstances.

TIMEFRAME 30 minutes groups 20 minutes plenary METHOD Divide participants into small groups, give them flip chart sheets and pens and the participants’ notes. Give them 5 minutes to read it and then give them the questions. Depending on time available and the focus of the session, participants can address all or just some of the questions.

Each group is to then feedback into the plenary and discuss the points made.

RESOURCES Flipchart paper and marker pens.

Copies of Participants’ Notes.

–  –  –

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this exercise, you will be able to:

• describe the risks of children being sexually exploited in transit camps;

• explain the most effective ways of dealing with these situations;

• assess the usefulness of existing guidelines and policies in these circumstances.

TIMEFRAME 30 minutes groups 20 minutes plenary METHOD

Take 5 minutes to read the following then:

1. Discuss fully and list on flip chart pages the answer(s) to the question(s).

2. Each group to feed back into the plenary and discuss the points made.

You are a protection officer working for UNHCR in Country HOMELAND, to which hundreds of thousands of refugees are returning under a massive UNHCR voluntary repatriation programme.

Under this programme refugees are transported from refugee camps in neighbouring countries of asylum to temporary transit centres in HOMELAND. The transit centres are run by UNHCR through its implementing partner, WELCOME.

Returnees normally remain at the transit centre for a few days, where they are registered and receive food and non-food items. Subsequently they are transferred by UNHCR to their homes.

Included amongst the returnees to HOMELAND are thousands of separated children. Some of these children are repatriating alone and others are returning with the foster families with whom they lived in countries of asylum. As a result, UNHCR has set up special measures for separated children at the transit centres.

All separated children are interviewed and registered by WELCOME social workers for purposes of tracing and family reunification. Children who are completely alone are taken by WELCOME from the transit centres to one of the

–  –  –

many children's centres located throughout HOMELAND. Children who are with foster families generally remain with the foster families.

PROBLEM: DAY 1 Late on a Friday afternoon, you receive an urgent call on the radio from a WELCOME camp manager operating a transit camp located nearby. She advises that she has just learned from one of her social workers that a 12 year old girl, who recently arrived at the transit centre with a foster father, is being sexually abused by the foster father. She asks you to come immediately.

When you arrive at the transit centre, the WELCOME social worker who knows about the case fills you in on the details. Approximately one week ago, a man with four young children aged between 3 and 12 arrived from a country of asylum with a UNHCR convoy to the transit centre. He claimed that he was their foster father, however he had no registration papers indicating this, as is normally the case. The children appeared to the social workers to be in very poor health. After a few days, some other returnees at the transit centre reported to the WELCOME social worker that the man was sexually abusing one of the children, a girl aged 12 years. The social worker tried to take the four children to a children’s centre, but the man refused. The social worker became angry and went to the local authorities to arrest the man, but the authorities refused for lack of medical evidence.

Eventually the social worker told his supervisor, the WELCOME camp manager, who immediately contacted you.



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