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«Arizona Department of Education Creditable Food Guide Child and Adult Care Food Program Health and Nutrition Services Creditable Food Guide Child and ...»

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 Encourage adult staff or providers to eat with the children. Eat the same foods that have been prepared for the children.

 Do not offer bribes or rewards for eating foods. This only reinforces that certain foods are not desirable.

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Clean. Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives, and countertops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening.

Separate. Cross-contamination is how bacteria spread. Keep raw meat, poultry, and seafood and their juices away from ready-to-eat food.

Cook. Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive.

Chill. Bacteria spreads fastest at temperatures between 40 °F °F, so chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

Source: USDA and the Partnership for Food Safety Education

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VITAMINS A & C It’s important to serve foods high in Vitamin A at least twice a week and foods high in Vitamin C daily. Vitamin A supports healthy vision as well as cell growth and reproduction.

Vitamin C helps heal wounds and repair and maintain bones and teeth. Below is a list of foods rich in Vitamin A and C

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IRON RICH FOODS

Serving iron rich foods as often as possible is a best practice. Iron provides oxygen to the body’s cells and helps with muscle function and brain development. Below is a list of foods high in iron.

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COMBINATION FOODS

Definition: “Combination food” means any single serving of food that contains two or more of the required meal components.

Definition: “Entrée or main dish” means the main course of a meal. The main course may be a combination of foods that contains a meat/meat alternate as one of the components.

Requirements for meals:

I. Combination foods served as an entrée or main dish may be credited as the meat/meat alternate plus a maximum of two of the required meal components if amounts of each are sufficient to meet meal pattern requirements.

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Beef Stew with beef, carrots, potatoes, and onions; credit as:

1. Meat/meat alternate component

2. Fruit/vegetable component (can count as only 1 component)

Chef Salad with egg, turkey, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, celery, and cucumber; credit as:

1. Meat/meat alternate component

2. Fruit/vegetable component (can count as only 1 component)

Spaghetti with ground beef and tomato sauce; credit as:

1. Meat/meat alternate component

2. Fruit/vegetable component (can count as only 1 component)

3. Grains/Breads component

Sloppy Joes (ground beef and tomato sauce on a bun); credit as:

1. Meat/meat alternate component

2. Fruit/vegetable component (can count as only 1 component)

3. Grains/Breads component

Homemade Pizza; credit as:

1. Meat/meat alternate component

2. Fruit/vegetable component (can count as only 1 component)

3. Grains/Breads component

Grilled Cheese Sandwich; credit as:

1. Meat/meat alternate component

2. Grains/Breads component II. Combination foods in dishes served as an accompaniment to the entrée or main dish may be credited for one of the two required meal components if the amount is sufficient to meet meal pattern requirements.

–  –  –

Examples:

Carrots and Peas with cooked peas and carrots; credit as:

1. One fruit/vegetable component Green Salad with lettuce, tomato, sometimes served on sandwiches or in tacos,

credit as:

1. One fruit/vegetable component III. Some combination foods may be credited for two of the required meal components if

amounts of each are sufficient to meet meal pattern requirements:

–  –  –

Fresh fruit salad with peaches, melons, and bananas served for lunch or supper;

credit as:

1. Fruit/vegetable component

2. Fruit/vegetable component IV. Combination foods in beverage form made from milk and solid fruits or vegetables may be credited as meeting the following meal components if amounts of each are

sufficient to meet meal pattern requirements:

–  –  –

Banana Cow with banana and milk; credit as:

1. Milk component

2. Fruit/vegetable component (can count as only 1 component)

MISCELLANEOUS QUESTIONS

1. Can foods brought in by the parents be used to fulfill meal pattern requirements?

No, the participating CACFP institution or provider must provide all the required meal components in order to claim the meal for reimbursement. Foods provided by parents must be considered “extras.” Foods that are not creditable (i.e., cupcakes, candy) should be served only after the meal.





2. Can foods donated to the center be used to fulfill meal pattern requirements?

For example, a case of apples donated by a fruit company.

Yes, if available to all children. Include in the food receipts that it was received as a donation.

3. Are picnics or cold meals acceptable?

Yes, as long as they meet the meal pattern requirements.

4. Are foods from fast food restaurants creditable?

No, the institution or contracted food vendor must provide all required meal components.

5. Can vegetarian meals be claimed for CACFP reimbursement?

Yes, however, the meals must still meet the meal pattern requirement. Meat alternates that can be credited toward meeting the CACFP meat requirement include cheese (natural, processed, cheese foods, and cheese spreads), cottage cheese, and ricotta cheese; yogurt, eggs, cooked dry beans, and peas; peanut butter; nuts and seeds; nut or seed butters; or any combination of the above. Meat binders and extenders and 100 percent vegetable protein products are not creditable in the CACFP except under certain conditions.

6. Can home dried and home canned foods be served in the childcare centers?

USDA guidance has advised against the use of home canned foods in a group-feeding situation; i.e., childcare centers. If they are served in a family childcare home, there is the risk the childcare home provider assumes that the canned item was prepared correctly and is safe (free of harmful organisms). Home canned and frozen fruits may be allowed. Childcare home providers should check first with their sponsoring organization.

DOCUMENTING

CONVENIENCE FOODS

When commercial products are used in Child Nutrition Programs to meet the meal pattern requirement, sponsors must determine these products’ contribution.

Child Nutrition labels and product analysis sheets provide valuable information.

Manufacturers also have advertising literature available. Each of these provides product information but is different from each other.

Advertising Literature Advertising Literature is information provided by the company which may contain valuable information about one or more of the company’s products but it may not be used to support the contribution that a production makes toward the meal patterns.

Child Nutrition (CN) Label A CN label is a product label found on meat, poultry, seafood, meat alternate and juice products, which contains a statement that clearly identifies the contribution that the product makes toward the meal pattern requirements. A CN labeled product provides a warranty against audit claims, if used according to the manufacturer’s directions, for noncompliance with the meal pattern requirement. This warranty applies to the CN labeled product portion, not the entire meal.

A CN label will always contain the following information:

 the CN logo, which is a distinct border  the meal pattern contribution statement  a six-digit product identification number  USDA/FNS authorization  the month and year of approval

A CN label statement does not do the following:

 Assure that a product is “good for children”  Assure that a product is “acceptable” to children  Suggest that products without CN statements are inferior

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Product Analysis Sheet A product analysis sheet is written by the manufacturer and contains a statement that clearly identifies the contribution that the product makes toward the meal pattern requirements. This statement is based on formulation and/or laboratory testing and is signed by a high-ranking official in the company. Product analysis sheets carry no USDA warranty nor do Nutrition and Technical Services Division review it.

In order to determine a product’s contribution toward the meal pattern, the following

information should be included:

 Weight of raw portion  Percent of raw meat or poultry  Percent of fat of raw meat  Percent dry vegetable protein products (VPP) if product contains VPP  Percent protein of the vegetable protein product (on an as purchased basis)  Certification that the vegetable protein product used meets USDA-FNS requirements.

Sponsors may verify the accuracy of the information on a product analysis sheet by having the product tested at an independent laboratory.

–  –  –

VARIETY (IES) OF MEAT USED IN PRODUCT:

CHICKEN BREAST INCLUDING RIB MEAT AND THIGH MEAT

TOTAL WEIGHT OF UNCOOKED PRODUCT:.72 OZ.

WEIGHT OF RAW MEAT:.44437 OZ.

PERCENT FAT OF RAW MEAT: 8-20% WEIGHT OF DRY VPP: N/A

WEIGHT OF HYDRATED VPP: N/A

WEIGHT OF RAW MEAT AND HYDRATED VPP: N/A

PERCENT VPP

(ON A FULLY HYDRATED BASIS REPLACING RAW MEAT): N/A

WEIGHT OF DRY WHOLE EGG: N/A

WEIGHT OF OTHER MEAT PORTION INGREDIENTS:.06643 OZ.

WEIGHT OF BREADING (IF USED):.209 OZ.

TOTAL WEIGHT OF READY TO COOK PRODUCT:.72 OZ.

I CERTIFY THAT TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE, THE ABOVE INFORMATION IS TRUE AND CORRECT

AND THAT THE ABOVE MEAT PRODUCT (ONE NUGGET, READY FOR COOKING), CONTAINS.31 OUNCES OF

COOKED LEAN MEAT/MEAT ALTERNATE WHEN PREPARED ACCORDING TO DIRECTIONS.

____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________

COMPANY OFFICIAL’S SIGNATURE TITLE

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INFORMATION RESOURCES

Arizona Department of Education www.ade.gov/health-safety/cnp/cacfp or (609) 542-8700 Arizona Nutrition Network www.eatwellbewell.org Building for the Future: Nutrition Guidance for the Child Nutrition Program www.nfsmi.org of (800) 321-3054 CACFP National Professional Association www.cacfp.com CACFP Sponsor’s Association www.cacfp.org Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) www.cdc.gov or (800) 311-3454 Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion www.cnpp.usda.gov or (703) 605-4266 Fight BAC! Keep Foods Safe From Bacteria www.fightbac.org Food and Drug Administration (FDA) www.fda.gov or (888) 463-6332 Food and Nutrition Information Center www.nal.usda.gov/fnic or (301) 504-5719 Foodsafety.gov www.foodsafety.gov National Association for the Education of Young Children www.naeyc.org or (800) 424-2460

INFORMATION RESOURCES

National Dairy Counsel www.nationaldairycouncil.org or (800) 426-8271 National Meat Association (510) 763-1533 National Nutritional Foods Association (949) 622-6272 Nursing Mothers Counsel, Inc (650) 599-3669 Nutrition.gov www.nutrition.gov United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association www.uniteduffva.org United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Services

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