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«P.H.REANEY Litt.D., Ph.D., F.S.A. Third edition with corrections and additions by R.M.WILSON M.A. LONDON AND NEW YORK First published as A Dictionary ...»

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: Walter Bridel 1196 FrLeic; Richard Brydel 1266 FFEss. OE brīdel ‘bridle’, as an occupation name. cf. bridelsmyth 1321–4 Pat, ‘Bridle-Cutters…and all other Makers, Dressers, or Workers in Leather’ (1697 NED).

–  –  –

: Giolla Brighde 1146, McGilbrid 1511, Bridson 1609 Moore. A Manx name, originally Mac Giolla Brighde ‘Bridget’s servant’s son’, from St Bridget. Pronounced Brideson. cf.

Irish KILBRIDE, Gaelic MCBRIDE.

A dictionary of english surnames 444

–  –  –

: Potier de Brikendon’ 1176 P (Herts); John de Brikedene 1296 SRSx. From Brigden Hill in Ashburnham, or Brigdene Fm, Hill in Glynde (Sx). Sometimes, perhaps, from Brickendon (Herts), Brygyndon 1346.

–  –  –

: Robert del Brig 1275 Wak (Y); Alexander del Brigg 1332 SRCu; Robert atte Brig 1379 PTY. ‘Dweller by the bridge’, ME brig(g), ON bryggia, the northern and Scottish word for bridge.

The dictionary 445

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: John Briht 1252 Rams (Hu); William le Brythe 1278 AssSo; Herveus Brite 1279 RH (C); Adam Bright 1296 SRSx. OE beorht ‘bright, beautiful, fair’.

–  –  –

: Bricteva, Britheue 1066 DB; Godric Brihteve filius c1095 Bury (Sf); Birghiva 1208 Cur (Herts); Angerus filius Brihtiue 1219 AssL; Adam Brightyeue, Thomas Brytheue 1326, 1327 FFSf; Edmund Brightyeve or Britiff 1467 Bardsley (Nf); John Beriffe 1496 Dickin (Ess); Richard Brygthewe, Brighteve 1479 SIA xii, 1508 NorwW (Nf); Thomas Bereve 1522 SIA xii; John Brightif 1559 Bardsley (Nf). Berriffis from OE Beorhtgifu ‘fair gift’;

Brightiff is from the metathesized form Brihtgifu, a woman’s name still in use in the 13th A dictionary of english surnames 446 century. v. BRIGHTY.

–  –  –

: Brihtmarus, Britmar 1066 DB; Ædmer Brihtmari filius c1095 Bury (Sf); Brichmerus filius Hunne 1193 P (Nf); Lemmer Brihtmer c1095 Bury (Sf); John Brictmer 1221 AssWo; John Britmar 1309 SRBeds; William Brightmer 1332 SRSx; Robert Brykemare 1568 SRSf. OE ‘fair-famous’, a personal-name common in DB and throughout the 12th century. Britmer became Brimmer and Brykemare became, through metathesis, Byrkmar, Burkmar.

Brighton, Brighten

: Richard de Brighton 1328 FrY; Adam de Bryghton 1341 Pat (Cu); Nicholas de Brighton 1342 Cl (Nt). From Breighton (ERYorks), Bristun DB, Bryghton 1298–1567, Breighton 1636 (PN ERY 239). The surname can have no connexion with the Sussex Brighton, earlier Brightelmeston. This occurs as Brighton in deeds of the reign of Charles I but did not come into common use until the early nineteenth century (PN Sx 291).

–  –  –

: Brictuinus, Brithuinus 1066 DB; Brithwen uidua 1066 Winton (Ha); Brictwen 1148 ib.;

Brihtwinus de Ixwrthe 12th MedEA (Sf); Brichtwenne 1222 DBStP (Ess); Bartholoraew Bryctwyne 1296 SRSx; John Bryghtwyne 1332 ib. The surname forms are from OE Beorhtwine (m) ‘fair friend’; the modern forms point rather to OE Beorhtwynn (f) ‘bright joy’.

–  –  –

: Robert de Brictewell’ 1205 Cur (O); Robert de Brichtewell’ 1221 AssGl; William Brightwell 1439 FFEss. From Brightwell (Berks, Sf), or Brightwell Baldwin (O).

–  –  –

: Brictui 1066 DB (Do); Brichwi 1188 BuryS (Sf); Berdwi faber 1192 P (K); Osbertus filius Britwi 1221 ElyA (Ess); Alexander Brictwi 1210 Cur (C); Agnes Britwy 1277 Ely (Sf); Thomas Brightwy 1327 SRSx. OE Beorhtwīg, Brihtwīg ‘bright war’. The surname may also be for BRIGHTIFF, from the 1479 Brygthewe.

Brignall, Brignull, Brignell, Bricknell : Simon de Brigenehall 1313 FrY; John de Brigenhale 1327 SRSf; Williara Brigkenhall 1400, Robert Brignall 1409 FrY. From Brignall (NRY).

–  –  –

: v. BREAM Brimblecombe, Brimacombe, Brimicombe, Brimmacombe, Brimmicombe, Brinicombe : From Brimblecombe (Devon), where the surname was Brumelcome in 1281 and Bremylcomb in 1330 (PN D 343).

–  –  –

: John de Brinzun 1240 FFEss; Joan de Bryaunesoun 1297 ib.; Bartholomew Brinsun 1274 RH (Ess). This family came from Briençun (Norraandy) and has left its name in Brimstone Hill in Little Wakering (Essex), Breaunsons 1419, Bremsons, Bramsons 1549, Brendston 1553. New Hall in Purleigh was formerly called from them; Brymshams 1527, Bremstones 1537, Brempsons 1554 (PN Ess 204, 223). The surname may also have contributed to Bramson, Branson, Branston.

–  –  –

: Matilda Brine 1279 RH (O); William Bryne 1358 FFY; John Bryne 1641 PrSo. Perhaps OE bryne ‘burning’, in one of its various senses. Sometimes, perhaps, from Welsh bryn ‘hill’.

–  –  –

: Peter de Brinton’ 1190 P (Nth); Adam de Brinton’ 1221 AssSa; Anker de Brimyngton 1387 Shef. From Great Brington (Ess), Brintone DB, Brimpton (Berks), Brintone DB, Brinton (Nf), Brineton (St), or Brimington (Db), Brinneton 1239.

–  –  –

: Ralph Briseban 1275 AD i (Mx); John Brusebon 1297 MinAcctCo; William Brisbone 1298 Black. A hybrid, from OFr brise ‘break’ and OE bān ‘bone’, ‘break bone’.





Brisbourne is due to the common pronunciation of -bourne as -bone. cf. CRAKEBONE.

–  –  –

: Alice de Bresinden 1274 RH (K); William Bryssendenne 1348 FFK; Symon Brisenden 1525 SRSx. From Brissenden Fm in Ickford (Bk), or Brissenden in Frittenden, in Tenterden (K).

–  –  –

: John de Brystall 1392 FrY. From Burstall (ERYorks), Bristall 1160–2, or Birstal (WRYorks), Bristal 1292. The raodern form has been influenced by that of the better A dictionary of english surnames 452 known Bristol.

–  –  –

: Lia de Bristou 1191 P (Gl); Peter de Bristo 1195 P (O). From Bristol (Glos), originally Brycgstow, DB Bristou. The form in common use until at least the 16th century was Bristow. The modern Bristol is scribes’ Latin. Occasionally the source may be Burstow (Surrey), Brystowe from 1486, or Bristow Fm in Frimley (Surrey), Brister 1765. v. PN Sr 286, 127.

–  –  –

: John de Brelagne 1291 AssSt; Thomas de Brytannia 1297 MinAcctCo; John de Bretayne 1327 SRC. From Brittany, OFr Bretagne. Some of the modern forms are from the ME Brytane, Brittan ‘Breton’.

–  –  –

: Alsi filius Brixi 1066 DB (Ha); Godric filius Brichsii c1095 Bury (Sf); Alanus filius Brixi 1209 P (Nf); Stephen, Roger Brixy 1275, 1276 RH (Nf, Beds). OE Beorhtsige, Brihtsige ‘bright victory’.

–  –  –

: John le Brade 1212 Cur (K); Gilbert le Brode 1235 FFEss. OE brād, ME brod(e) ‘broad’. In the north and Scotland, the ā remained in ME, later spelled ai, giving modern Brade, Braid.

–  –  –

: Adam Bradbelt 1379 PTY; Richard Broadbelt 1682 FrY. ‘Broad belt’, one who wore a broad belt, a nickname for a stout man. cf. William Brodgirdel 1275 RH (Nt).

–  –  –

: (i) Thomas Bradheuid 1243 AssDu; John Brodheved 1281 Rams (Hu); Daniel Broadhead 1664 FrY. ‘Broad head’, OE brād, hēafod. William Brodhod 1327 SRDb may have borne the same nickname, with ON hofuð, Da hoved for OE hēafod; or he may have worn a broad hood (OE hōd). cf. GREENHEAD. (ii) Henry de Bradeheved 1272 AssSt;

Alan del Brodekeued 1332 SRLa; Robert de Bradehed 1332 SRSt. ‘Dweller by the broad headland.’

–  –  –

: John Brocos 1337–8 FFSr; Arnold Brokos 1399–1400 IpmY; William Brockas 1642 PrD. From Brocas (Les Landes). Sometimes, perhaps, for Brookhouse.

–  –  –

: (i) Ralph Broc 1119 Colch (Ess); Joel le Broc 1222 Pat (D); Richard Brock 1275 SRWo. OE brocc ‘badger’. From c1400 brock is often used with the epithet stinking and in the 16th century meant ‘a stinking or dirty fellow’ (ELPN). Or from OFr broque, brocke ‘a young stag’. v. BROCKET. (ii) Laurence del Brock 1267 Abbr (So); Nigel de Brocke 1285 FA (Sx); Robert de la Brockes 1286 Ipm (Wo); Alma ate Brock’, Imeyna du Brock’ 1297 MinAcctCo. OE brōc ‘brook, stream’. For the short vowel, cf. the rivername Brock (Lancs). In Kent and Sussex, brook still means ‘water-meadow’ and in the plural ‘low marshy ground’. Hence ‘one who lives by a stream or by the water-meadow (s)’. v. MELS and BROOK.

–  –  –

: v. BIRKENSHAW Brocket, Brockett The dictionary 459 : (i) Osbert Brochard 1175 P (Ha); John Brocard 1321 SRC. (ii) Henry Broket 1279 RH (O); John Broket 1297 MinAcctCo. OFr brocart, brocquart from OFr broque, brocke, from which was formed ME broket, brocket ‘a stag in its second year with its first horns’ (c1410 MED).

–  –  –

: Nicholas Brikilbank 1524 SRSf; William Brokylbanke 1532, Nicholas Brykelbank 1546 FFEss; Ralph Brocklebanke 1645 FrY. ‘Dweller by the bank in which there is a badger hole’, OE brocchol, ME banke.

–  –  –

: Broclos, Brocles 1066 DB (L); Roger Broclaus Ric l Gilb (L). ON bróklauss ‘breechless, without breeches’, a nickname used also as a personal name which is the first element of Brocklesby (Lincs). cf. Robert Brekeles 1276 RH (Y), the English equivalent.

–  –  –

: Walter de Brokweye 1255 RH (W). ‘Dweller by the road near the brook.’ Brockwell:

Walter de Brocwelle 1298 IpmGl; John Brokewell 1542 SRD. ‘Dweller by the badger stream’, OE brocc, wiella.

–  –  –

: Dyota Brokewode 1319 SRLo; Henry Brokwode 1370–1 FFSr. From Brookwood in Woking (Sr), or ‘dweller by the wood in which small streams rise’, OE brōc, wudu.

–  –  –

: Dionisius Brokden 1470 FrY; William a Brokeden 1525 SRSx; John Brogden 1597 FrY; Samuell Broggdin 1689 RothwellPR (Y). From Brogden (WRY), or Brook Dean in Fittleworth (Sx).

–  –  –

: Alsi de Bruneham 1066 DB (Beds); Robert de Bromeholme 1274 FrY; Simon de Bromhamme 1296 SRSx; James Bomholme 1642 PrD. From Bromham (Beds, W), Broomham in King’s Nympton (D), or Bromholm (Nf).

–  –  –

: Geoffrey de Brunton’ 1205 P (Y); William de Bromptone 1312 LLP D. From Brompton (Middlesex, Salop, ERYorks, NRYorks).

Bromwich, Bromage, Bromige, Brommage : Adam de Bromwiz 1221 AssWa; William de Bromwic 1225 AssSt; Thomas Bromidge 1581 Bardsley; John Bromage 1583 ib. From West Bromwich (Staffs) or Castle and Little Bromwich (Warwicks).

–  –  –

: Metonymic for Brocher. cf. Ralph Brocher 1222 FFSf; John Brocher, Roger le Brochere 1281 LLB B. ME, OFr broche ‘a tapering, pointed instrument or thing, a lance, spear, bodkin, etc.’, also ‘a brooch’. Hence, a maker of broaches (lances, spears, etc.) or of brooches. cf. William Bruchemaker 1381 PTY and William ploghbrocher 1281 MESO (L), probably a maker of ploughshares.

Brook, Brooke, Brookes, Brooks, Broke, Bruck

: Eustace delbroc 1130 P (Nth); Rand’ de Broc 1157 P (Ha); William de la Broke 1208 Cur (Sr); Emma de Brokes 1220 Cur (Sf); Peter Attebroke 1262 For (Ess); William aboventhebroc 1276 MELS (Wo); William atte Brouk 1296 SRSx; William in le Broke, Ithebroke 1317 AssK; Sarra Bithebrok 1327 SRSo; William atte Bruck 1327 SRC;

William del Brokes 1–32 SRLa; John Bethebrokes 1332 SRWo. From Brook (Kent, Rutland), Brooke (Norfolk) or from residence near a stream or by the water-meadow(s).

v. BROCK.

–  –  –

: William Brokere, John le Broker 1296 SRSx; John le Brouker 1327 ib. ‘Dweller by the brook.’ William le Broker (1332 ib.) was probably a descendant of Anger atte Broke (1296 ib.)

–  –  –

: Thomas de Brokefeld’ 1199 MemR (O); Adam del Brokefeld 1332 SRLa. ‘Dweller by the field near the brook’, OE brōc, feld.

Brookbouse, Brockhouse, Brockis, Brokus : Ralph del Brokhouses 1297 SRY; Hugh de Brokehous’ 1379 PTY; William Brokkus 1562 Black. ‘Dweller at the house by the brook.’

–  –  –

: Thomas del Broklondon 1257 MELS (Sx); Osbert de Broklonde 1296 SRSx; Richard atte Broclonde 1327 MELS (Sx). From Brookland (K), one or other of the Brookland(s) in Sussex, or ‘Dweller by the marshy land’, OE brōc, land.

–  –  –

: Robert de Brome 1193 P (Lei); Alexander Brom’ 1221 AssWa; Eustace de la Brome 1275 RH (K); Richard atte Brome 1285 Ass (Ess); Richard del Brom 1297 SRY. From Broom (Beds, Durham, Worcs), Broome (Norfolk, Salop, Warwicks) or Brome (Suffolk), or from residence near a place where broom (OE brōm) grew.

Brooman, Broman

: Bruman(nus) 1066 DB (K, Bk); Brummanus 1140–53 Holme (Nf); Gilebertus filius Brunman 1211 Cur (Cu); Brihtmar Bruman, Brunman 1199, 1200 P (Nf); Ralph Broneman 1296 SRSx; John Bromman 1327 ib.; Alexander Brounman 1327 SR (Ess);

John Broman 1372 ColchCt. OE Brūnmann.

–  –  –

: Thomas de Brommor, John Brommor 1296 SRSx; Robert Bromere, Bromor 1327, 1332 ib. All probably came from Bramber Fm, Bremere Rife or Broomer Fm in Birdham (Sussex). v. PN Sx 73, 80.

–  –  –

: Hamo de Bromfeld 1275 RH (K); William atte Bromfeld 1296 SRSx; John de Bromfeld 1327 SRSf. From Broomfield (Essex, Kent, Som), Bromfield (Cumb, Salop) or from residence near broom-covered open-land (OE brōm, ƒeld).

–  –  –

: Matthew de Bromhale 1182 P (Ch); Godwin de Bromhal’ 1182–1200 BuryS (Sf). From Broomhall (Ches, WRYorks), Bromhall (Berks) or residence by a broom-covered nook (OE healh).

–  –  –

: v. BREWSTER Brothers The dictionary 471 : Broder (St, Sf), Brodor (St), Brodre (D) 1066 DB; Willelmus filius Brother 1202 AssL;



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