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«P.H.REANEY Litt.D., Ph.D., F.S.A. Third edition with corrections and additions by R.M.WILSON M.A. LONDON AND NEW YORK First published as A Dictionary ...»

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A dictionary of english surnames 620

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: John Chapel 1202 P (Nf); Richard de la Chapele 1296 SRSx; Eymer atte Chapele 1312 LLB D; William del Chapell 1380 FrY. From residence near or service at a chapel, ME, OFr chapele. cf. CAPEL.

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: John Chaper 1200 Cur (Sr); Geoffrey Chipere 1254 ELPN; William le Chappere 1327 MESO (Ha); Ralph Chiper 1327 SRC. A derivative of OE cēapian ‘to bargain, trade, buy’. The early examples of Chiper are rather from OE cīepan, cīpan ‘to sell’. In both cases, the meaning is ‘barterer, trader’.

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: Adam Charthecrowe, Adinet Charricrowe 1286 AssCh. ‘Drive away the crow’, OE cærran, crāwe. cf. Andrew Charrehare 1245 FFL ‘turn hare’, a nickname for a speedy runner.

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: John ate Charde 1281 AssW; Hugh de Cherde 1335 Glast (So); William Chard 1641 PrSo. From Chard (So), or ‘dweller by the rough land’, OE ceart.

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: Herluin Caritet 1148–54 Bec (Sx); Geoffrey de Caritate, de la Carite 1185–7 P (Ha);

Turstan Charite 1195–7 P (Nf); John de la Charite 1203 Cur (Ha); Richard Charite, Karite Hy 3 Gilb (L); Robert Karitas 1236 FrLeic. ONFr caritedh, caritet, later carité, OFr charitet, charité, Lat cāritātem, found in ME in various senses: ‘alms-giving, hospitality’ (a1160 MED), ‘man’s love for God’ (a1225), ‘Christian love’ (c1200), from which a nickname could easily arise. The local origin is from ONFr carité, OFr charité ‘hospice, refuge’.

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: William Charke 1221 AssGl; Robert Chark 1327 SRSo; William Charke 1415–16 Hylle. OFr charche ‘a load’. Probably metonymic for a carrier or a porter. v. CARKER.

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: Charlemayn 1230 P (Wo); Gregory Cherlemayn 1261–74 Glast (D); Nicholas Scharlemayn 1292 IpmGl; John Charlemayn 1353 Putnam (W). Lat Carolus Magnus, OFr Charlemagne. The name probably owes its presence in England to the popularity of the Charlemagne romances.

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: (i) Carolus, Karolus 1208 Cur (Sf, Nf); Karolus filius Gerberge 1210 Cur (Nf); Carolus filius Willelmi 1212 Cur (Nf); Colina, Nicolas Charles 1250 Fees (Sf), 1253 Bart; Robert son of Charles, Thomas and Joan Charles 1274 FFSf. OFr Charles, from a latinization Carolus of OG Karl ‘man’, introduced into England by the Normans, but never common until the Stuart period. (ii) Osbert Cherle 1193 P (Wa); Frebesant Cherl 1221 ElyA (C);

John Charl 1296 SRSx. OE ceorl, originally ‘a freeman of the lowest rank’; in ME ‘a tenant in pure villeinage, serf, bondman’; also ‘countryman, peasant’. Charl would later be inevitably assimilated to the personal name.

The dictionary 623

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: Walter de Cherlelai 1202 P (Bk); Dobyn de Charlag 1276 AssLa; Henry Charley 1524 SRD. From Charley (Lei), or Charley Fm in Stanstead St Margarets (Herts).

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: Richard Carloc 1279 RH (C); Peter Charloc 1317 AssK; Roger Charleloke 1497 ArchC

42. OE cerlic, cyrlic, ME carlok, charlok ‘wild mustard’. Metonymic for a grower or seller of this.

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: (i) John Charlot 1275 SRWo. Charl-ot, a diminutive of Charles. (ii) Usually Huguenot.

Charles Charlot, a converted Catholic curé, fled to England and was minister of the Tabernacle in 1699.

A dictionary of english surnames 624

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: Jordan, Robert de Cherleton’ 1193 P (Gl), 1230 Cur (Beds); Hugh de Charleton 1333 IpmNt; Robert Charletone 1372 CorLo. From one or other of the many places of this name.

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: Gilbert de Charneles 1170–5 DC (Lei); Hugh de Charnell 1246 FFC; Maud de Cimiterio 14th Rad (C). ME, OFr charnel, ‘burial-place, mortuary chapel, cemetery’, denoting one in charge of this.

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: Thomas le Charner 1279 RH (C); Richard le Charner 1280 AssSo; John le Charner 1327 SRC. OFr charner, charnier ‘burial-place’. Probably metonymic for a grave-digger.

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: (i) Gilbert le Charpenter 1227 FFHu; William le Charpenter 1276 AssLa, 1346 LLB F.

OFr charpentier ‘carpenter’, v. also CARPENTER. (ii) Also Huguenot, from John Charpentier who fled to England and was minister of the Malthouse Church, Canterbury, in 1710 (Smiles 375).

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: Richard de Chert c1200 ArchC vi; John de la Chert 1241 PN Sr 306; Ralph Atte Chert 1290 MELS. Frora residence near a rough common (OE cert, ceart), as at Chart (Kent, Surrey) or Churt (Surrey).

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: (i) Alcher de Chartris 1179 P (Sx); Robert de Chartres 1296 (Black); James Charterhouse 1556 ib.; John Charters 1790 ib. From Chartres (Eure-et-Loire). (ii) Ralph de Chateriz 1259 FFC; Alan de Chartres, de Chartris 1279 RH (Hu), 1293 Ipm (Hu);

John Charteres 1417 FFHu; John Chateryse 1445 NorwW. From Chatteris (Cambs), earlier Chateriz, Chatriz 1086, Chartriz 1200 (PN C 247–8). cf. Abbatissa de Charters 1279 (Hu).





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: (i) John de Cherville 1302 PetreA; John Charvel 1531 FFEss; John Charvolle 1537 PetreA. cf. Charville’s Fm in West Hanningfield (Ess). (ii) John Charfowle 1462 FFEss;

John Charfoule 1483 PetreA; John Charfowle 1538 FFEss. A nickname ‘turn fowl’, OE cærran, fugol.

The dictionary 627

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: Robert Chace 1327 SR (Ess); John Chase 1393 FrY. Probably metonymic for chaser, from OFr chaceur, chaceour ‘hunter’. cf. Stephen le Chacur 1204 Cur (Nt), Walter Chacere 1327 SRSf.

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: Stephen le Chacur 1204 Cur; Simon le Chacer 1275 SRWo; John Chasour 1327 STJEss. OFr chaceur, chaceour ‘hunter’. cf. Philip Chaceboef 1218 P (D) ‘chase ox’;

Robert Chacecapel 1201 P (D) ‘chase horse’; Peter Chaceporc’ 1253 CartAntiq ‘chase pig’; Walter Chacero 1261–2 FFWa ‘chase roe’.

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: Simon de Caucy 1205 Cur (L); Geoifrey de Chausi 1206 Cur (O). From Chaussy (Seine-et-Oise) which may also have become CAUSEY. cf. Chazey Fm in Mapledurham (Oxon), from Walter de Chauseia c1180. Chazey Wood is Causies Wood 1658 (PN O 60).

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: Adam Chasteyn, Robert Chasten 1279 RH (C); John Chasteyn 1327 SRSf. ME chastein, OFr chastaigne ‘chestnut-tree’. ‘Dweller by the chestnuttree’, originally atte chastein.

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: Ralph le Chaucer 1220 Cur (Lo); Robert le Chauser 1256 AssNb. OFr chaucier ‘maker of chausses’, from OFr chauces ‘clothing for the legs, breeches, pantaloons, hose’. In 1484 these were ‘chauces of yron or legge harneys’ (NED), but ME chawce was a general term for anything worn on the feet, boots, shoes, etc. As Baldwin le Chaucer (1307 LLB B) was of Cordwanerstrete, the early chaucer was probably a worker in leather, a maker of leather breeches, boots, etc.

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: Richard le Chaueler 1221 AssWa; Thomas Chauler 1249 AssW. ‘Gossip, chatterer’, from a derivative of OE ceafl ‘cheek, jowl’, cf. ME chavlen, chaulen ‘to wag the jaws, chatter’.

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: (i) Gilbert de Chele(s) 1275 RH (L). From Cheal (Lincs). (ii) William, Robert Chele 1275 SRWo, 1327 SRSx. OE cele, ciele (sb.) ‘cold, coldness’, ME chile, chele ‘cold (of the weather), frost’. cf. FROST.

A dictionary of english surnames 632

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: Abraham filius Chere 1214 Cur (Ha); Reginald chere 1189 Sol; Henry Chere 1327 SRSo; John Chere 1524 SRSf. ‘Precious, dear, worthy’, OFr chier, cher. Used also as a personal name.

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: John Chetour 1327 SRSf. ME chetour, an aphetic form of eschelour ‘escheator, an officer appointed to look after the king’s escheats’ (c1330 MED).

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: Laurence de le Eschekere 1256 Ass (Ha); Roger de la Checker 1279 RH (C); Gilbert le Cheker 1316 Wak (Y); Roger Cheker, son of Christopher Atcheker 1508 ArchC 40. ME cheker, an aphetic form of ME, AFr escheker, originally a chess-board, later the table that gave name to the king’s exchequer; a table for accounts; the Court of Exchequer.

Laurence de Scaccario (1279 RH), who has left his name in Chequers (Bucks), was, no doubt, one of the leading officials of the Exchequer. As a surname, it probably meant, as The dictionary 633 a rule, a clerk in the exchequer.

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: Æluric Chec c1095 Bury (Sf); Adam, Walter Cheke 1202 P (W), 1243 AssSo. OE cēace, cēce ‘jaw-bone’, a nickname for one with a prominent jaw. v. CHICK.

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: v. CHEAR Cheesborough, Cheesbrough, Cheeseborough : Edward Cheseburgh 1526 FrY; Robert Cheesbrough 1611 RothwellPR (Y). From Cheeseburn (Nb), Cheseburgh 1286.

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: Ailwin chese Hy 2 Bart (Lo); Willelmus cum frumento 1176 P (Y); John Chese, William Chuse 1279 RH (Hu, O); Robert Chuse, Michael Chouse 1332 SRSx. OE cēse (Anglian), WSaxon ‘cheese’, used of a maker or seller of cheese. cf. John de Hugat, cheser 1316 FrY, Walter le cheser 1366 AD i (He).

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: Henry le Cheseman 1260 AssC; Williarn le Chesman 1311 Battle (Sx); Thomas Chesman, le Chusman 1327 SRSx; Adam le Chisman, Alice Chisman 1327 SRSo.

‘Maker or seller of cheese.’ cf. Robert le Chesemaker 1275 RH (L), Baldwin le Chesemangere 1186 P (K).

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: Richard Chesewricte 1228 Pat (L); Augustin le Chesewryghte 1293 MESO (Y); John Cheswright 1478 LLB L; Margaret Chestwright 1795 SfPR. OE (f) ‘cheese-maker’, perhaps also OE *cēsewyrhla (m).

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: William Cheure, Capra 1086 DB (D, W); Hamelin Chieure 1186 P (L); Nicholas le Chiuer 1327 SRSx. AFr chivere, chevre, OFr chievre, Lat capra ‘she-goat’ (1491 NED), probably denoting agility.

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: A distinguished Lorraine family, dispersed on the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, some of them eventually settling in Waterford and Lismore. Philip Chenevix fled to England, his grandson becoming Bishop of Killaloe in 1745, whilst his great-grandson, Richard Chenevix Trench, was Archbishop of Dublin.

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: William de Cerinton 1201–2 FFK; Stephen de Cheriton 1260 AssC; Richard Cheryngton 1383 AssLo; Peter Cheryton 1524 SRD. From Cherrington (Gl, Sa, Wa), or Cheriton (D, K, So).

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: Robert Chyry 1284 AssLa; Hugh Chirie, Richard Chery 1524 SRSf. ME chirie, cherye ‘cherry’. Probably ‘grower or seller of cherries’. cf. PERRY, PERRIMAN.

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: Burchard de Cestresham 1200 P (Bk); William de Chesham 1297 MinAcctCo (W):

William Chessam 1525 SRSx; John Chessum 1728 Bardsley. From Chesham (Bucks), Cestreham DB, or Chestham Park in Henfield (Sussex), Chesham 1657.

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: William Chest 1185 Templars (K); Alice Chest 1341 FFY. Either OE ceast ‘strife’, for a contentious person, or OE cest, cyst ‘chest, box’, metonymic for a maker of these.

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: Richard de Cestre 1200 P (L); John, William de Chester 1332 SRWa; John Chestre 1366–7 FFWa; Barbara Chesters 1611 RothwellPR (Y). Usually from Chester (Ches), but occasionally from Little Chester (Derby), Chester le Street (Durham), or Chesters (Northumb).

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: Bruning de Cestretona 1086 InqEl (C); Robert de Chesterton’ 1227 Cur (O); Edward Chestreton 1416–17 FFWa. From Chesterton (Cambs, Glos, Hunts, Oxon, Staffs, Warwicks).

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: John Chetel’ 1379 PTY; William Chetill 1464–5 IpmNt; Henry Chettle 1546 PN Do ii 74; William Chettle 1641 PrSo. Anglo-Scandinavian *Cytel. Sometimes from Chettle (Do).

Chetwin, Chetwind, Chetwyn, Chetwynd : Richard de Chetewynde 1268 AssSt; William de Chetwynde 1343–FFWa; William Chetwyn, Chetwynd 1415 IpmY. From Chetwynd (Sa).

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: Roger Cheval 1208 ChR; Herbert le Cheval 1220 Cur (Beds); William Cheval 1241 FFEss. Either a nickname from OFr cheval ‘horse’, or metonymic for CHEVALIER.

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: (i) Robert le Chevaler 1205 Cur; Nicholas Chivaler 1221 ElyA (Sf); William Cheualer 1332 SRSx. AFr chevaler, chivaler, OFr chevalier ‘horseman, mounted soldier’. (ii) Probably usually Huguenot. Antoine-Rodolphe Chevalier, born at Monchamps in 1507 and Professor of Hebrew at Cambridge, returned to France, but fled after the Massacre of St Bartholomew and died in Guernsey in 1572. His son, Samuel Chevalier, came to England from Geneva. In 1591 he was minister of a French church in London, and later of the Walloon church at Canterbury (Smiles 376–7).

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: (i) William Cheuerel(l) 1195–6 P (Berks); Tristram le Cheverer, le Cheverell 1278, 1289 LLB A, le Gheverel(t)er 1291–2 ib. C. ME chevrelle, OFr chevrele, chevrelle ‘kid’ (a1400 NED), but in ME always used in the sense of the full cheverel-leather ‘kidleather’. The earliest example may be a nickname from the kid, but cheverel was certainly sometimes used for chevereller ‘a maker or seller of kid-leather goods’. cf.

Ralph le Cheverelmongere 1310 LLB B. (ii) Simon de Chiverell’ 1200 Cur (W); John Chiverel 1275 RH (W). From Great or Little Cheverell (Wilts).

The dictionary 643

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: Margaret Chyuin 1295 Barnwell (C); Simon Cheuyn 1327 SRC. OFr chevesne, Fr chevin, a fish, the chub (c1450 NED). ‘The cheuyn is a stately fish’ (1496). ‘Chevins and Millers thumbs are a kind of jolt-headed Gudgeons’ (1655).

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