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«P.H.REANEY Litt.D., Ph.D., F.S.A. Third edition with corrections and additions by R.M.WILSON M.A. LONDON AND NEW YORK First published as A Dictionary ...»

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: (i) Randal de Chiw 1201 AssSo. From Chew (Som). (ii) Geoffrey Chiue 1203 Cur (C).

OE cīo, cēo (not found in ME), a bird of the crow family, a name applied to all the smaller chattering species, especially the jackdaw.

A dictionary of english surnames 644 Cheyney, Cheyne, Chainey, Cbaney, Cheeney, Chene, Cheney, Chasney, Chasteney, Chastney, Chesnay, Chesney, Chestney : Radulfus de Calsned 1086 DB (Sx); Hugh de Chaisnei, de Cheisnei 1140, 1166 Eynsham (O); Robert de Cheinneial 183 DC (L); Hugh de Chennei 12th ib.; William de Chesnei 1205 Cur (L); Bartholomew del Chennay 1212 Fees (Sr); William de Cheny 1235 Fees (Sf); Roger del Chesne 1236 FFEss; Alexander de Cheyny 1242 Fees (Beds);

Alexander de Cheyne 1296 SRSx; John de Chene 1317 AssK. The DB under-tenant came from Le Quesnay (Seine-Inférieure). v. ANF. Others may have come from Quesnay (Calvados, La Manche) or Quesnay-Guesnon (Calvados). All derive ultimately from MedLat casnetum (OFr chesnai) ‘oak-grove’ and the surname may also denote an immigrant from France who lived by an oak-grove or came from a place Chenay, Chenoy, or Chesnoy.

–  –  –

: Richard Chike 1198 P (Do); Richard le Chike 1317 AssK. ME chike ‘chicken’ (c1320 NED), used as a term of endearment. Chike occasionally becomes Cheke, which would become CHEEK: William Chike, Cheke 1278 PN K 269. Cheek’s Fm in Bentley (Hants), Cheakes c 1550 Req, owes its name to William Chike (1333 SR).

–  –  –

: Richard de Chigenhale 1311 LLB D; Robert Chicknell 1662 HTEss. From Chignall (Ess).

Chilcot, Chilcott, Chillcot, Chillcott, Chilcock : Baldwin de Chillecota 1169 P (Gl); John Chticott 1641 PrSo; Robert Chilcot, Chikott 1642 PrD. From Chilcote (Lei, Nth), or Chilcott (So).

–  –  –

: (i)Ægelmerus Cyld, Æluricus Cyld, quod intelligitur puer c975 LibEI (Herts); Aluric Cild, Cilt 1066 DB (Ess, C); Rodbertus Puer 1086 DB (Do); Gode Cild cl095 Bury (Sf);

luinus child 1148 Winton (Ha); Willelmus Infans 1159 P (Ess); Roger le Child 1204 Cur (Berks). OE cild ‘child’. In the earliest examples it probably denotes one comparable in status to the drengs of the northern Danelaw, the sergeants of Norraan times. Ekwall has shown that Robert Child (1202 ELPN) may have been called by the pet-name of Child because he was the youngest child or a minor at the time of his parents’ death. cf. puer and Infans supra. In the 13th and 14th centuries child appears to have been applied to a young noble awaiting knighthood (MED). It may also mean ‘childish, immature’ (c1200 MED), ‘a page attendant’ (1382 ib.). (ii) Peter de la Child 1262 ArchC iii; Richard Attechilde 1267 FFK. From residence near a spring, OE celde.

Childerhouse, Childers

: Hemericus de Childerhus 1230 Cl (Nf); William atte Childerhous 1275 RH (Nf); Philip del Childirhus 1295 AssCh; John Chyldirhous, Childurous 1415, 1450 AD iv, v (Sf);

Thomas Childers 1675 Shef. From an unrecorded OE *cildra-hūs ‘children’s house, The dictionary 647 orphanage’. cf. childermas and CHILDREN.

Children

: John atte Children 1267 Pat (K); Daniel Chyltren, de Chiltren 1298, 1300 LoCt; Peter ate Children 1317 AssK; Thomas Children 1477 RochW; Robert Achildren 1560 ib.

Identical in formation and meaning with CHILDERHOUSE, from an unrecorded OE *cildra-ærn ‘children’s house, orphanage’.

–  –  –

: (i) Chilmannus Lenner, Chilleman Dilly 1327 SRC; Nicholas Childman 1239 FFC;

William Childeman 1253 AssSt; Williara le Childesman 1276 AssSo; Walter Chileman 1311 ColchCt. Childesman is ‘the servant or attendant of the young noble’. cf. CHILD.

Childman may have the same meaning, or it may be from an unrecorded OE personal name *Cildmann, one of the late OE personal names compounded with -mann. Nicholas Childman was the son of Childman 1279 RH (C). (ii) William, Henry Chilemound(e) 1327 SRSo; John Chylemonde ib.; Agnes Chilmon 1580 Bardsley. This must be OE Ceolmund, ‘ship-guardian’, common in the 8th and 9th centuries and recorded once later, c1050, in Herts. It must have continued in use after the Conquest, at least in Somerset.

For -man from -mund, cf. OSMAN.

–  –  –

: Robert de Cilterne 1296 MPleas (Mx); John Chilterne 1360, Richard Chylterne 1397 FFEss. From the Chiltern Hills (Bk, O).

A dictionary of english surnames 648

–  –  –

: William de Chilton 1195 P (Nb). A common surname from one of the many places named Chilton. Editha de Childton’, de Childhamton’ 1297 MinAcctCo (W) came from Chilhampton (Wilts), a development of the name not hitherto noted.

–  –  –

: William de la Chymene 1275–6 IpmY; John de la Chemene 1332 Kris; William Chimnay 1453, Chymney 1457 FrY. ‘Dweller by or worker at the furnace’, OFr cheminee.

–  –  –

: Stephen Chinne 1243 AssSo; John Chynne 1276 RH (Hu). OE cin ‘chin’. The nickname may be for one with a prominent or long chin or for one with a beard. cf. ‘Swor bi his chinne bat he wuste Merlin’ (c1205 NED); ‘Forked fair þe chine he bare’ (a1300 ib.).

–  –  –





: Richard Chyne 1275 SRWo; Henry de Chine 1279 RH (C); Ryner Attechine 1298 LLB B. OE cinu ‘fissure, cleft, chasm’; in Hants ‘a deep narrow ravine’. ‘Dweller by the ravine.’ The dictionary 649

–  –  –

: Isabella Chippes 1275 SRWo; John Chip 1327 SRSo; William Chippe 1606 PN Do i

343. ME chip, chippe ‘a small piece of wood chipped or cut off, a nickname for a carpenter or a wood-cutter. Occasionally, perhaps, from ME Chepe ‘Cheapside’: Alan de Chepe 1311 LLB D; William Chepe 1369 Shef.

–  –  –

: Henry Chesewic 1170–87 AD i (Lo); John de Cheswyk 1275 RH (Ess). From Chiswick (Essex, Middlesex) or Cheswick (Northumb), all ‘cheese-farm’.

–  –  –

: Thomas de Chetyndone 1331 LLB E; Roger Chittinden 1525 SRSx; James Chetenden 1560 StaplehurstPR (K). From Chittenden (K), Chidden (Ha), Chitteden 1241, or Cheddington (Bk).

–  –  –

: Alexander Chiterllng’ 1221 AssWo; Simon Chyterling 1275 SRWo. ME cheterling, chiterling ‘the smaller intestines of beasts, especially as an article of food, either fried or boiled’. Metonymic for a maker or seller of this.

–  –  –

: (i) Matthew de Chytelesber’ 1275 RH (D). From Chittleburn (Devon), where -burn is, as not uncommonly, for earlier -burgh. (ii) Matthew Chettleborowe 1653 EA (NS) ii (Sf);

Thomas Chittleborough, Henry Chetleburgh, Robert Chickleborowe 1674 HTSf. From Kettleburgh (Suffolk), Chetelbiria, Kettleberga DB, ‘Ketil’s hill’ or possibly a Scandinavianized form of an OE *cetel-beorg ‘hill by a narrow valley’ (DEPN). The persistence of the Ch- in the local pronunciation suggests that the latter is the correct etymology. Chittock: Roger, Henry Chittok 1279 RH (Hu), 1327 SRSf. Chilt-ok, a diminutive of ME chitte ‘young of a beast, cub, kitten’ (a1382 MED).

The dictionary 653

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: Albert Chiue 1185 P (C); Geoffrey Chiue 1211 Cur (Hu); William Chive 1227 Cl.

ONFr chive, OFr cive ‘the smallest cultivated species of Alluin, the leaves of which were used in soups, stews, &c.’ Metonymic for a grower or seller of this.

–  –  –

: Hugh de Chelmundeleg’ 1288 AssCh; Thomas Cholmeley 1567 Bardsley; William Chombley 1666 ib.; Susanna Chumbly 1689 ib.; John Chumley 1726 ib. From Cholmondeley (Ches). Roger Chomley (1493 GildY) was a son of Richard Chamley (1502 ib.) or Sir Richard Cholmley (Ed.).

–  –  –

: William de Colwiche 1328, Isobel Choldeswych 1411, Walter Chollesweche 1528 Hoskins. From a lost Cholwich, possibly surviving as Cholwich Town in Plymouth (D).

The dictionary 655

–  –  –

: Walter Chopin 1219 Cur (D); Henry Choppin 1280 AssSo. OFr chopine, an old measure (1275 NED). ‘Chopine a chopine; or the Parisien halfe pint; almost as big as our whole one’ (Cotgrave). cf. Fr chopiner ‘to tipple’. A nickname for a tippler.

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: Walter de Cherlelaie 1201 P (Bk); Elias de Chorlegh 1350 Putnam (La); Robert Chorley 1642 PrD. From Chorley (Bk, Ch, La, St), or Chorley Wood (Herts).

–  –  –

: Thomas Chose 1327 SRSo; Hamund Chose 1361 Husting; Harao Chose 1365 LLB G.

OFr chois ‘noble, handsome’.

A dictionary of english surnames 656

–  –  –

: Chuna (f) 1248 AssBerks; Chun Pimme, Chunne Mervyn 1279 RH (C); Norman Chone 1257–8 FFSx; Thomas Choune 1327 SREss; John Chowne 1524 SRD; Nicholas Chowne alias Chone 1559 Pat (Lo). Evidently from a ME personal name, Chun, Chunn, both masculine and feminine, and not otherwise known. Sometimes, perhaps, the Cornish form of John.

–  –  –

: Thomas Kyrystendome 1379 PTY; Robert Cristendom 1429 AssLo; Andrew Cristendome 1559 Pat (Beds). OE crīstendōm ‘Christendom’, but its meaning as a surnarae is unknown.

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: Chrlstiana 1154 Bury (Sf), 12th DC (L); Cristianus 1201 Cur (Berks); Thomas filius Cristian 1228 FFEss; Robert Crestien 1163–9 Miller (C); Philip Cristian temp. John HPD (Ess). Cristian, Lat Christianus, was common in Britanny. In England the masculine name was less frequent than the feminine, which was also common as Cristina, the native form. v. CHRISTIN.

A dictionary of english surnames 658

–  –  –

: Thomas Crysty 1412 FFY; John Chrysty 1457 Black (Aberdeen). A Scottish and Northern English pet-form of Christian or Christine. cf. Cristine or Cristy de Carvan(t) 1296 Black.

–  –  –

: Cristina 1219 AssY; Cristina de Burlingeham 1221 AssGl; Peter Cristyn 1296 SRSx;

Thomas Crystyn 1332 SRSt. Cristin is the English form (from OE crīsten ‘christian’) of Cristiana. v. CHRISTIAN.

–  –  –

: John Cristenesone 1312 FFSf; Robert Cristianson 1324 Wak (Y); Henry Cristeson 1412 Black (Stirling); Alexander Cristisone 1446 ib.; John Cristerson 1514 FrY. ‘Son of Chrislian or Christine’.

–  –  –

: William Cristeman’ 1202 Cur (Ha); Walter Cristesmon 1275 SRWo. ‘Servant of Chrisl’, probably a pet-form of Christian, Christine or Christopher. cf. John Crist 1309 SRBeds.

–  –  –

: Ralph Cristemesse 1185 RotDom (Ess); Roger Cristemasse 1191 P (Sf); Richard The dictionary 659 Cristesmesse 1308 LLB C. A frequent surname for one born at Christmas. cf. Matilda Candelmes 1379 PTY.

–  –  –

: Christoforus 1209 P (Hu); Cristoferus Murdac 1221 AssWa; Roger Cristofore 1379 PTY; Laurence Cristofore 1396 AssWa. Gk Xρiστoφóρoς, Lat Christopherus ‘Christbearing’. The christian name does not appear to have been common and examples of the surname are late. The earliest noted denotes residence: Thomas Cristofre (1319 SRLo), son of William de Sancto cristoƒoro (1292 ib.), also called William Cristofre (1317 Husting), who left his son a tenement in St Christopher (St Christopher le Stocks, London).

–  –  –

: Cristeredus, Cristiredus, Cristredus, Cristred 1189 Sol; Robert filius Cristraed 1195 Cur (So); Robert Cristred 1207 P (Gl); John Cristred 1332 SRSx. A late OE personal name, not otherwise known.

–  –  –

: Richard, Gilbert Chubbe 1180 P (D), 1202 AssL; William Chubbe, Chuppe 1230 P (Lo). ME chubbe, a fish, ‘chub’ (c1450 MED), was also used of a ‘lazy spiritless fellow;

a rustic, simpleton; dolt, fool’ (1558), whilst Bailey has ‘Chub, a Jolt-head, a greatheaded, full-cheeked Fellow’, a description reminiscent of that of the chevin, another name for the chub. v. CHEVINS. Thus the nickname may have meant either ‘short and thick, dumpy like a chub’ or ‘of the nature of a chub, dull and clownish’.

–  –  –

: Thomas Attechirche 1275 SRWo; Henry atte Churche 1296 SRSx; Henry of the Chirche 1368 FrY. Usually ‘dweller near the church’, but of the Chirche suggests an official, verger, sexton, etc., rather than residence near the church. John Atte-cherch, rector of Metton, Norfolk, in 1338 (Bardsley), can hardly have owed his surname to his residence. As rector, his attribute would have been Parson. Attecherch is here probably a hereditary surname.

Churchard, Churchyard

: John atte Chircheyerde 1298 AssSt; Henry del Churcheyard 1332 SRWa. This can hardly mean ‘dweller by the churchyard’. The natural expression would be ‘at the church’. It probably denotes one responsible for the upkeep of the churchyard. Richard de la Chirchard (1291 MELS) is identical with Richard atte Church (1289 ib.), both surnames being occupational. Similarly, Reginald atte Churchedoor (1300 Bardsley) was the church door-keeper.

Churchers, Churches, Churchouse, Churchus

: Iuo de Cherchous 1327 SRSf; William del Chyrchehous 1332 SRSt. The church-house was formerly a house adjoining the church where church-ales, etc., were held, a parishroom. Again probably occupational, ‘care-taker of the parish-room’, though he may also have lived there.

A dictionary of english surnames 662

–  –  –

: Walter atte Chircheheye 1275 SRWo; Peter atte Churchehey 1327 SRSo; Agnes atte Churcheye 1327 PN W 155. ‘Dweller by the church enclosure, i.e. the churchyard’, OE cyrice, (ge)hæg.

–  –  –

: Ismena de Chirchefeld’ 1199 Pleas (Nth); Henry de Chirchefeld’ 1253 ForNth. From Churchfield Copse in Bosham (Sx), Churchfield Fm in Benefield (Nth), or ‘dweller by the church field’, OE cyrice, feld.

–  –  –



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