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«P.H.REANEY Litt.D., Ph.D., F.S.A. Third edition with corrections and additions by R.M.WILSON M.A. LONDON AND NEW YORK First published as A Dictionary ...»

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Cockin, Cockett, Cockitt The dictionary 699 : Henry, John Cokin 1207 Cur (Ess), 1273 RH (Nt); Richard Cochet 1170 P (Ess); John Coket 1221 AssWa. These two surnames are metonymic for bakers. cf. Ralph Cocunbred 1209 FrLeic, Adam, Ralph Cokinbred 1265, 1299 ib. Cockin-breadis presumably the same as cocket-bread, a leavened bread or loaf slightly inferior in quality to the wastell or finest bread (1266 MED). It has been suggested (without evidence) that the bread was stamped with a seal or cocket. This was a seal (AFr cokette) belonging to the King’s Custom House (1293 NED) and might have been used by metonymy as a surname for a sealer or a customs’ house officer. v. also COCKAYNE.

–  –  –

: (i) William Cocking’ 1327 SRSx. From Cocking (Sussex). (ii) William Coccing 1266 LeiBR. Probably OE *Coccing ‘son of Cocc’. v. also COCKAYNE.

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: William, Reynballus Cokeman 1276 AssSo, 1297 MinAcctCo; John Cookman 1374 ColchCt. Either ‘servant of Cook’ or ‘the cook’s servant’. Cockman is from cōkman, with shortening of the vowel before OE cōc became ME couk, cook.

A dictionary of english surnames 700

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: Algor Cochenoc 1066 DB (Herts); William Cockenage 1428 LLB K; William Cocknedge 1591 AssLo. From Cocknage (St), or Cockenhatch in Barkway (Herts).

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: Symon de Cokshute 1296 SRSx; John Cokschote 1312 ColchCt; Alice atte Cocshete 1327 SRSx; John Cocke Shoute 1562 AD vi (Berks). Sometimes pronounced Coeshot.

OE ‘a place where nets were stretched to catch woodcock’ as at Cockshoot Fm (Worcs), Cockshot (Kent), Cockshut (Lancs), etc.

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: Alanus filius Chod 1150–5 DC (L); Osbert cod 1148 Winton (Ha); John Lecod 1219 AssY. Chod may be an example of OE *Codda, unrecorded, but found in place-names, or an original nickname. The surname was usually a nickname but the exact meaning is obscure. It may be OE cod(d) ‘bag, scrip’, used a1250 of the belly or stomach, hence, perhaps, for a man with a belly like a bag. Or we may have ME codd(e) ‘cod’. cf. John le Codherte 1297 MinAcctCo ‘cod-heart’, Robert Codbody 1332 SRSx, either ‘with a body lik a cod’ or with one like a well-fllled bag, and Robert Codhorn 1202 P (Y), where the meaning is not clear. cf. also cod’s-head ‘a stupid fellow’ 1566 NED. In the 16th century codder denoted a worker in leather, a saddler or a peltmonger so that the surname may, perhaps, also be metonymic for a maker of leather bags or a saddler.

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: Williara Codele 1306 AssW; Reginald le Codele 1327 SRSx; John de Codel 1327 SRWo; Gylemyne Codel 1375 IpmW. A nickname from the cuttlefish, OE cudele, ME codel.

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: (i) John Kodling 1208 Cur (Y); Robert Codling 1275 RH (L); Emma Codelingg’ 1297 SRY. ME codling ‘a young or small cod’ (1289 MED), either a seller of these fish, or, perhaps, as the only examples noted are from Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, for a fisherman, or used as an affectionate diminutive. This would survive only as Codlin or Codling. (ii) Richard Querdeleon 1247 AssBeds; Adam Girdelyon, Girdelion 1296–7 Wak (Y); William Gerlyn 1296 SRSx; William Querdelion 1304 LLB C; John Qwerdeling 1327 SRSf; Robert Gerling 1327 SRC; Thomas Querdelyng 1365 LoPleas;

John Kodlyng, George Codlyng 1524 SRSf; Wyllyam Gyrlinge 1547 EA (NS) ii (Sf). Fr cæur-de-lion ‘lion-heart’. cf. the development of codling ‘a hard kind of apple’ (sound to the core), querdlynge c1400, codlyng 1530, quodlinge 1586, quadlin 1625 NED.

Girdelion would become Girdling and then Girling. Codling is common in Yorkshire (North and East Ridings), Quodling and Quadling are Norfolk and Suffolk names, whilst Girling, particularly common in Suffolk, is frequent also in Essex and Norfolk.

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: William Codeman 1327 SRC; Robert Codman 1524 SRSf. An occupational name, either a worker in leather, a saddler, a catcher or seller of codfish, or a cobbler. v. CODD, CODE.

A dictionary of english surnames 704

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: Osbert Ka 1188 P (L); John Co 1221 AssWa; Gilbert le Co 1252 Rams (Hu); Beatrice le Coe 1274 RH (L); Roger le Coo 1327 SRC. ME co, coo, the midland form corresponding to northern ka, ON ká ‘jackdaw’ (c1325 MED). v. also KAY.

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: Thomas le Coffer 1298 LoCt; John Coffere 1299 LLB B. OFr cof(f)re ‘box, chest’ (c1250 MED), here used for OFr coffrier ‘maker of coffers’ (1402 MED), also ‘treasurer’ (a1338 MED); John le Cofrer 1275 AssSo, John le Cofferer 1290 LLB A.

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: (i) William de Cogan 1185 P (Glam); Richard Cogayn 1271 AssSo; Peter Coggane 1642 PrD. From Cogan (Glamorgan). (ii) In Ireland also for MacCogan, Ir Mac Cogadhain ‘son of the hound of war’.

A dictionary of english surnames 706

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: (i) Robert Cog 12th DC (Nt); John le Cogge 1328 IpmW; Robert Cog 1375 AssNu. ME cogge ‘cog of a wheel’. Perhaps a nickname for a wheelwright, or for a miller. (ii) Alice de Cogges 1279 RH (O); Peter de Coges 1275 SRWo; Alexander atte Cogge 1387 MELS (So). From Cogges (O), or ‘dweller by the hill’, v. MELS 43.





Cogger

: Arnaldus coggorius, coggarius 1191–2 P (L); Osbert (le) Coggere 1195–7 P (Do). The Latin forms are derivatives of MedLat coga, cogo ‘boat’ (c1200, 13th MLWL), for ME cogge, OFr cogue ‘small ship, cock-boat’, used by Chaucer of the ships in which Jason and Hercules sailed. A cogger (c1450 NED) may have been a builder of cogs but was more probably a sailor or master of the cog. Roger le Cogere and John le Cogger were bailiffs of Dunwich in 1218 and 1219 respectively (Gardner). The only examples that do not come from coastal counties are from Cambridgeshire, Herts and Surrey where the Cam, the Lea and the Thames were important waterways, so that Thuresson’s alternative suggestion ‘maker of cogs for wheels’, is an unlikely origin.

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: Colbert 1066 DB (D, Ch, L); John Colbert 1205 P(D). OG Colbert.

Colborn, Colborne, Colboum, Colbourne, Colburn, Colburne, Colbon, Colbond : Geoffrey de Colebrunn’ 1208 Pl (Y); William de Colburn 1386 FrY; John Colborne 1642 PrD. From Colburn (NRYorks), or Colesborne (Glos). Occasionally a personal name may be involved. ON Kolhrún, Kolbiorn, cf. Robert filius Colbern 1185 P(D).

The dictionary 709

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: Colbrand, Colebran 1066 DB (D, Wa); Colebrandus c1200 DC (L); Malger Colebrond 1275 RH (Sx); Walter Colebrand 1297 MinAcctCo. ON Kolbrandr, OSw Kolbrand.

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: Ralph de Colebi 1192–1218 YCh; William de Colby 1332 IpmNt; William Colbe 1525 SRSx. From Colby (Norfolk, Westmorland), Coleby (Lincs), or Coulby (NRYorks).

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: (i) William de Colden 1255 RH (Bk); William Colden 1327 SRY. From Colden in Hebden Bridge (WRY). (ii) David Colden 1459 Black. From the lands of Colden near Dalkeith (Midlothian).

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: Cola, Cole 1066 DB; Cole, Cola filius Lanterii c1145 EngFeud (K); Robertus filius Cole 1206 AssL; Geoffrey, Richard Cole 1148 Winton (Ha), 1185 Templars (Wa);

George Coles 1555 FrY. The personal name may be ON, ODa Koli, a short form of names in Kol-, but the distribution in DB suggests that it is more often OE Cola, an original byname from OE col ‘coal’ in the sense ‘coal-black, swarthy’. The surname may also be a nickname with the same meaning: John le Col 1321 FFEss.

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: Coleman 1066 DB; Colemannus de Eston’ 1176 P (Bk); Hervicus, Richard Coleman 1166 RBE (Y), 1176 P (Sr). The surname is early, frequent and widely distributed. In the north it is usually from Olr Colmán, earlier Columbán, adopted by Scandinavians as ON Kalman, and introduced into Cumberland, Westmorland and Yorkshire by Norwegians from Ireland. In DB the personal name is southern and south-eastern and is probably OG Col(e)man. In the Sussex Subsidy Rolls, where both Coleman and Collier are frequent surnames, both probably mean ‘charcoal-burner’.

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: Cristian de Colrig 1275 RH (D); John Colregge 1327 STJEss; Humphrey Coleridge, William Colridge 1642 PrD. From Coleridge in Egg Buckland, or Coleridge House in Stokenham (D).

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: (i) Algarus Colessune 1138–60 ELPN. ‘Son of Col’, probably ODa Kol, or possibly ODa Koli. (ii) Ælstan Cole sune c1095 Bury (Sf); Bruning Cola suna 1100–30 OEByn (D); William Colesone 1332 SRSt; John Colson 1379 PTY. The first two examples are from either ON Koli or OE Cola. v. COLE. Later examples may have the same origin or may belong below. (iii) John Collesson’ 1339 Crowland (C), 1379 PTY; John Colleson 1386 FFSf; John Collesson, Colson 1401, 1408 FrY. ‘Son of Coll, a pet-form of Nicholas.

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: John Colfox 1221 AssWa; Richard Colvox 1274 RH (Sa). ME colƒox, from OE col ‘coal’ and fox’, ‘coal-fox’, the brant-fox, a variety of fox distinguished by a greater admixture of black in its fur. According to Chaucer, the tail and both ears were tipped with black, unlike the rest of his hairs. A nickname. cf. ‘a collfox, ful of sly iniquitee’ (c1390 MED).

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: (i) Col 1066 DB (L); Colle serviens Henrici 1204 Cur (Y); Colle Rikmai 1247 AssBeds;

Robert Cholle 1166 P (Nf); Osbert, William Colle 1196 P (L), 1200 P (Wo); Thomas Colles 1327 SRSf; Robert Coule 1341 FrY; Thomas Cowles 1568 SRSf. The DB Col is ON Kollr, OSw Koll, or ON Kolr, ODa, OSw Kol. Colle may have the same origin or it may be for ON, ODa Kolli, but, especially in later examples, it is a pet-form of Colin, found from the beginning of the 13th century as a diminutive of Nicholas. (ii) Robert atte A dictionary of english surnames 714 Cole 1275 SRWo; Adam atte Colle ib. Probably ‘dweller by the hill’, from OE *coll ‘hill’. v. MELS.

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: Colard le Fauconer 1264 Ipm (Ess); Colard Hariel 1275 RH (Gl); Richard Colard 1332 SRSx. A pet-form of Nicholas, Col, plus the French suffix -ard.

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: Colet 1202 AssNth; Richard, Robert Colet 1213 Lewes (Nf), 1243 AssSo; Adam Collette 1332 SRSt. Col-et, a diminutive of Col (Nicholas) plus -et. There was also a feminine form: Collette 1379 PTY. Occasionally the surname is an aphetic form of acolyte: Simon Colyte 1294 RamsCt (Beds).

Colley, Collie

: Hugh Coly 1212 Cur (Y); Dande Colly 1219 AssY; Philip Coli 1275 SRWo. OE *colig ‘coaly, coal-black’. The original short vowel is retained in the 16th century colly ‘dirtied with coal and soot’. cf. ‘a colie colour’ (1565), colley sheep (with black faces and legs) 1793, and colley the Somerset dialect name for a blackbird. The surname probably meant ‘swarthy’, or, perhaps, black-haired.

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: Ranulf colier a11SO DC (L); Bernard le coliere 1172 P (So). A derivative of OE col ‘coal’. a maker or seller of charcoal (a1375 MED).

Collin, Collins, Collen.

Collens, Collyns, Colin : Colinus de Andresia 1191 P (Berks); Colinus 1196 FrLeic; John Collin 1221 Cur (D):

William Colin 1246 AssLa; Roger Colynes 1327 SRSo. Col-in, a diminutive of Col, a pet-form of Nicholas. Colinux Harrengod 1207 Cur (Sf) is identical with Nicholaux Harengot (1206 ib.). There was also a feminine form: Colina Charles 1250 Fees (Sf).

Colling, Collinge, Collings, Coling, Cowling

: Collinc 1066 DB (Sa, Db); Gerardus filius Colling 1185 P (Y); Aluuardus Colling, Collinc 1066, 1086 DB (W); Griffin Collingus c1114 Burton (St); Roger Kolling c 1125 MedEA (Nf); John Collynges 1376 AD iv (Sa). ON Kollungr. The distribution does not support Tengvik’s opinion that the name is of native origin. Scandinavian personal names are found in the south by 1066. Colling(s) may also be a late development of Collin(s).

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: John Colyngridge 1464 Cl (Lo). Perhaps from Cowan Bridge (La), Collingbrigke c1200.

Collingwood, Collingworth, Collinwood : Richard de Calangwode, de Chalaungwode 1323 AssSt, 1327 SRSt; John atte Calengewode 1349 DbCh; Ralph Colyngwood 1516 ib.; William Colynwod 1512 GildY.

From Collingwood (Staffs) ‘the wood of disputed ownership’.

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: Thomas, John Colynson 1349 Whitby (Y), 1382 FFHu; John Colisson 1381 SRSf;

Clement Collyngson 1524 SRSf; Thomas Colllson 1622 RothwellPR (Y). ‘Son of Colin’.

Colisson is ‘son of Coll’ or, possibly, of Cole.

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: John Collop 1279 RH (C); Henry Colhoppe 1290 FFEss. ME colhope, col(l)hop ‘an egg fried on bacon; fried ham and eggs’ (1362 NED). Probably a name for a cook-house keeper.

–  –  –

: (i) Reginald filius Colstan 1190 P (L); Colstan 1213 Cur (Do); Roger Colslayn 1297 SRY; Adam Colstan 1332 SRCu. OE Colstān, ON Kolstein. (ii) Roger de Coleston’ 1208 FFY; Robert de Colstone 1352 LLB G; John Colslon 1426 FrY. From Colston Basset, Carcolston (Notts), or Coulston (Wilts).

–  –  –

: Colsweinus 1109 Miller (C); Colseinus filius Godwini 1219 Cur (Herts); Edward Colswein 1189 Sol; John Colswein 1293 AssW; Agnes Colsweyn 1361 CarshCt (Sr). ON Kollsveinn, Kolsveinn.

–  –  –

: Godric, Anselm Colt 1017 OEByn, 1188 BuryS (Sf); Henry le Colt 1227 AssSt. OE colt ‘colt’, either a nickname ‘frisky, lively’, or metonyraic for COLTER, COLTMAN.

–  –  –

: Thomas Colthirst 1574 FrY; Thomas Colthurst 1615 PN Ch ii 84. From Colthurst Mill in Over Peover Chapelry (Ch), or Colthirst in Great Mitton (WRY).

–  –  –

: Thomas Columbel 1327 SRSo; Stephen Columbel 1332 SRDo; John Columbell 1409 PN Db 193. A diminutive of OFr columbe ‘dove, pigeon’.



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