WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 41 | 42 || 44 | 45 |   ...   | 125 |

«P.H.REANEY Litt.D., Ph.D., F.S.A. Third edition with corrections and additions by R.M.WILSON M.A. LONDON AND NEW YORK First published as A Dictionary ...»

-- [ Page 43 ] --

A dictionary of english surnames 722

–  –  –

: Richard de Collewele 1268 AssSo; Robert de Kolewelle 1296 SRSx; William de Colwell 1384 FrY. From Colwell (D, Nb), Colwall (He), or Colwell House in Wivelsfield (Sx).

–  –  –

: v. COLLIER Combe, Combes, Coom, Coombes, Coombs : Richard de la Cumbe 1194 FF (Sx); Alan in la Cumbe 1269 AssSo; Robert atte Cumbe 1296 SRSx; Thomas de Combe 1317 AssK; John ate Combe ib. From one of the many places named Comb, Combe or Coombe, or from residence in a small valley (OE cumb).

The dictionary 723

–  –  –

: William le Combere 1260 AssC; Roger le Coumber 1276 RH (Berks); John Comber 1296 SRSx; Walter Cumbar’ 1332 SRSx. ‘Dweller in a valley.’ v. COMBE and also CAMBER.

–  –  –

: William, Richard Cumfort 1269 AssSo, 1279 RH (O); Richard Counfort 1375 LoPleas.

ME cumfort, comfort, OFr cunfort, confort ‘strengthening, encouragement, aid, succour, support’, used of ‘one who strengthens or supports, a source of strength’ (1455 NED).

Comport seems to be a late development in Kent where both forms are still found.

Bardsley notes Edward Comport alias Comfort of Chislehurst.

–  –  –

(So), 1297 MinAcctCo (W). ME comander, comando(u)r ‘one who commands, ruler, leader’ (1300 NED), sometimes ‘officer in charge of a commandery’ e.g. of the Knights Templars (OFr comandeor).

–  –  –

: Odo Compyn, William Compayn 1327 SR (Ess). OFr compain, originally the nominative of compagnon ‘chum’ (1643 NED). A very rare surname. cf. Ralph Cumpainun 1221 AssWo.

–  –  –

: Gladwin de Cumtuna 1167– c1175 YCh; William de Compton’ 1212 Pl; Nicholas de Cumpton 1263 FFL; Richard Compton 1376 FFEss. From one or other of the many places of this name.

–  –  –

: Conanus dux Britanniae et comes Richemundie a1155 DC (L); Henricus filius Conani, Cunani 1196 P (Nth), 1208 Cur (Y); Connand, Conian Gossipe 1479–86 FrY; Gilbert, Thomas Conan c1198 Bart (Lo), 1297 MinAcctCo (Y); Robert Connand, Adam Conand 1319 PTY. OBret Conan, the name of Breton chiefs, kings and of a saint; one of the Breton names introduced at the Conquest and common among tenants of the Richmond fee in Lincs and Yorks.

–  –  –

: Roger de Cundi c1150 Riev (Y), de Condeio Hy 2 DC (L); Aliz de Condi 1185 Templars (L); Nicholas Cundy 1200 P (L). From Conde (Nord, Oise, Orne, etc.) v. also CONDUIT.

–  –  –

: Robert atte Conduyt 1334 LLB F; William atte Conduit 1340 AssC; Walter atte Condut 1342 LLB F. ME conduit, condit, cundit, OFr conduit, originally an artificial channel or pipe for conveying water, later a structure from which water was distributed, a fountain or pump. The surname probably refers to the latter. v. also CONDIE.

–  –  –

: Richard le Cony 1296 SRSx; Robert Cony 1327 SRC. ME conig, cony ‘rabbit’, a nickname. cf. CONNING. The fact that Thomas Cony (1323 FrY) was a pelter suggests that the surname may also have denoted a dealer in rabbit-skins, perhaps also a furrier.

–  –  –

: Robert le Conner 1297 LLB A; Geoffrey le Conner 1327 SRSf. OE cunnere ‘examiner, inspector’, especially an ale-conner.

A dictionary of english surnames 728

–  –  –

: Henry Cunrey 1212 P (Ha); Robert Conreys 1359 AssD. AFr cunrei. OFr conroi ‘a detachment of troops’. Probably for the leader of such a detachment.

–  –  –

: Richard Conestabl’ 1130 P (C); Alice Cunestabl’ 1200 P (L), la Konestabl’, Constabl 1202–3 AssL. ME, OFr cunestable, conestable, representing late Lat comes stabuli ‘count or officer of the stable’. ‘Chief officer of the household, court’ (1240), ‘governor of a royal fortress’ (1297), ‘military officer’ (c1300), ‘parish constable’ (1328 NED).

Constance, Custance

: (i) Custancia, Constancia Ric l Gilb (L); Custans 1379 PTY; Robert Custance 1207 P (C); John Custaunce 1279 RH (C). Fr Constance, from Lat constantia ‘constancy’, a common woman’s name, usually anglicized as Custance. v. also CUST. Occasionally we may have the masculine form: Hugo filius Constantii 1086 DB (Wa), Willelmus filius Custancii 1196 Cur (Lei). (ii) William de Constenciis c1150 DC (L); Walter de Constanc’, Walterus Custancie 1173–80, 1181 Bury (Sf); William de Custanc’ 1206 Cur (O). From Coutances (La Manche). A less common source.

–  –  –

: (i) Willelmus filius Constantini 1086 DB (Bk); Constanlin (Costetin CR) filius Godric 1166 P (Nf); Willelmus Constantinus c1150 Riev (Y); Geoffrey, Richard Costentin 1195 P (W), 1221 AssWo; Henry Constantin 1272 FFSf. OFr Constantin, Costantin, from Lat Constantimts, a derivative of constans ‘steadfast’. The real pronunciation is represented by COSTINS, COSTAIN, and the pet-form COSTE. Cossentine is due to assimilation of st to ss in Costentin. (ii) Geoffrey de Costentin 1153 StCh, de Constantin’ 1156–80 Bury (Sf); Henry Costentin, de Costentin 1166,1180 Oseney (O). From the Cotentin (La Manche). A less common source. v. OEByn, ANF.





–  –  –

: Hugo conuersus Hy 2 DC (L); Emma la Converse 1214 Cur (Ha); Peter le conuers 1219 AssY. OFr convers, Lat conversus, adj. ‘converted’ (a1300 NED), sb. ‘a convert’ (1388), used of one converted from secular to religious life in adult age, ‘a lay member of a convent’ (14..), a sense much older. The Cistercian and Augustinian conversi were men living according to a rule less strict than that of the monks or canons, engaged chiefly in manual work, with their own living quarters and their own part of the church. They were numerous among the Cistercians in the 12th and 13th centuries, often outnumbering the monks and were, by rule, illiterate. These lay-brothers were employed on the monastic manors and granges where they were liable to fall into the sin of owning private property.

They acquired a reputation for violence and misbehaviour—at Neath in 1269 they locked the abbot in his bedroom and stole his horses—and they were gradually replaced by more manageable paid servants.

Conway

: (i) John de Conweye 1268 Glast (So); David Coneway 1340–1450 GildC. From Conway (Caernarvon). (ii) In Ireland an anglicization of various Celtic names, e.g. Mac Connmhaigh ‘head smashing’, Mac Conmidhe ‘hound of Meath’, or Ó Conbhuidhe ‘yellow hound’, v. MacLysaght.

–  –  –

: John le Conyare 1327 SRSx; Henry Coyner 1327 SRSf. A derivative of OFr coignier ‘to stamp money, to mint’, a coiner of money, minter. Common from 1202 as Coner, Cuner. v. MESO.

–  –  –

: Roger de Coyners c1170 Riev (Y), de Coisneres, de Coisnieres 1196 P (Y); William de Coniers 1208 Cur (Nb). From Coignieres (Seine-et-Oise) or Cogners (Sarthe).

–  –  –

: v. COOLE Cook, Cooke, Cookes, Coke The dictionary 733 : Ælfsige ðene Coc c950 ASWills; Galter Coc 1086 DB (Ess); Walter le Kuc 1260 AssC;

Richard Cok 1269 AssSt; Henry Coke 1279 AssSo; Ralph le Cook 1296 SRSx; Joan Cokes ib.; Robert le Couk 1327 SRSx; Roger le Kokes 1332 SRSt. OE cōc ‘cook’, often, no doubt, a seller of cooked-meats, etc. v. also KEW.

–  –  –

: McCoil, McCole 1511, Coole 1666, Cooile 1711 Moore. Manx MacCumhail ‘son of Cumhall’, from comhal ‘courageous’.

A dictionary of english surnames 734

–  –  –

: William de Culinges 1203 Cur (K); Matthew de Couling 1260 AssC; Avice Couling 1327 SRSo; William Cowlyng 1520 FrY. From Cooling (K), Cowling (NRY, WRY), or Cowlinge (Sf).

–  –  –

: Robert (le) Cupere 1176–7 P (Sr); Selide le Copere, le Cupere 1181–2 P (Nf); William le Coupere 1296 SRSx; Geoffrey Cowper 1377 FrY; Walter Cuppere, Couper 1378, 1391 LLB H; John Copper 1424 FrY. ME couper ‘maker or repairer of wooden casks, buckets or tubs’ (c1400 MED). v. also COPPER.

–  –  –

: Reginald, John Cote 1201 P (L), 1219 AssY; William le Coot 1327 SRC. ME cote, coote ‘a coot’ (c1300 MED), originally the name of various swimming or diving birds, especially the Guilleraot, later restricted to the Bald Coot, whose appearance and traditional stupidity (‘as bald (or as stupid) as a coot’) would readily give rise to a nickname. The mad coote, With a balde face to toot’ (a1529 Skelton).

–  –  –

: Samson de Copland 1204 Pl (Nth, R); William de Coupeland, de Copeland 1256 AssNb; Thomas Coupeland 1376 FFEss. From Copeland (Cumb), or Coupland (Northumb).

–  –  –

: Copmannus Clokersuo 1141–6 Holme (Nf); Johannes filius Copeman 1256 AssNb;

John Copman 1205 P (Nf); Eustace Coupman 1230 P (Nf). ON kaupmaðr ‘chapman, merchant’, used also as a personal name.

Copestake, Copestick, Capstack, Capstick : Geoffrey Coupstak 1295 FrY. Henry Coupestack’ 1301 SRY; John Copestake 1474 FrY; A hybrid from OFr couper ‘to cut’ and OE staca ‘a stake’. ‘Cut-stake’, a name for a wood-cutter.

–  –  –

: Seman Copinger 1327 SRSf; William Copenger 1383 FFSf; William Copynger 1489 The dictionary 737 FFEss. Perhaps ‘dweller at the top of the hill’, a derivative of ME copping from OE copp ‘top, summit’.

–  –  –

: Adam de Coppelay 1297 SRY; Adam Coplay 1379 PTY; William Copley 1449 FFEss;

Susane Coppla 1559, Rychard Copplay 1560 RothwellPR (Y). From Copley in Halifax (WRY), Copley Plain in Loughton (Ess), or Copley Hill in Babraham (C).

–  –  –

(Sr). OE cop, copp ‘top, summit’, used of the head: ‘Sire Simond de Montfort hath suore by ys cop’ c1264 NED. (ii) Roger de la Coppe 1221 AssWa; John atte Coppe 1332 SRWa. ‘Dweller at the top of the hill.’

–  –  –

: Alestan Coppede 1066 Winton (Ha); Richard le Coppede 1231–2 FFWa; Hugh le Coppede 1276 RH (Lei). ME copped ‘peaked, pointed, haughty’. v. OEByn 306.

–  –  –

: Juliana la Copper 1275 SRWo; Bartholomew, John le Copper(e) 1327 SRSf; William le Copperer ib. In the 12th century, copere is certainly a variant of cupere ‘cooper’, found late as copper, but it may sometimes be from OE coper ‘copper’. The short vowel is clearly evidenced in Copper above, ‘a worker in copper’ used by metonymy for copperer. cf. COPPERSMITH, COOPER.

–  –  –

: Richard Copersmid 1212–23 Bart (Lo); Robert copersmith eHy 3 ib.; John le The dictionary 739 copersmyth 1305 LoCt. ‘Maker of copper utensils’ (1327 MED). cf. Hugo Coperman 1202 P (We), Stephen le Coperbeter 1286 LLB A.

–  –  –

: Copin 1188 P (L); Copin de Sancto Ædmundo 1188 P (Nf); Nicholas Copin 1243 AssSo; William Copyn 1275 SRWo. Copin is a pet diminutive of Jacob. de Troye (1273 RH) is identical with Copyn de Troys 1275 LLB A.

–  –  –

: Gilbert Copping 1188 BuryS (Sf); Henry Copping 1202 AssL. Apparently a derivative of OE copp ‘top, summit’, the exact meaning of which is obscure. For similar formations, cf. Robert Badding 1187–1221 ELPN, William Fatting’ 1297 ib., from the adjectives bad and fat.

–  –  –

: William Coppethorn 1359 60 FFWa; William Copthorn’ 1364 KB (Wa). Probably ‘dweller by the pollarded thorn’, ME coppede, OE þorn. cf. Copthorne Wood in Rickmansworth (Herts), and Copthorne in Burstow (Sr).

The dictionary 741

–  –  –

: (i) Richard Corbeitte, Corbell’ 1180, 1197 P (K); John Curbeyle 1327 SRC. OFr corbeille ‘basket’ (1706 NED). cf. Robert Corbiller 1225 MESO 171, from OF corbeillier ‘basket-maker’. (ii) Eudo Corbel 1198 P (Y). This might be identical with the above, but might also be from OFr corbel, now corbeau ‘raven’. cf. CORBET, CORBIN.

–  –  –

: Rogerius filius Corbet 1086 DB (Sa); Roger Corbet ib., 1158 P (Sa), 1221 AssWo;

Thomas le Corbet 1323 Eynsham (O). OFr corbet ‘raven’ (c1384 NED), probably a nickname for one with dark hair of complexion. v. CORB. CORBELL. CORBIN, CORFE.

–  –  –

AssY. OFr corbin from corb ‘raven’ (a1225 NED). (ii) William Corbun 1086 DB (Ess);

Hugo de Corbun ib. (Nf, Sf). From Corbon (Calvados) or. possibly, Corbon (Orne). The Essex example is probably due to early loss of the preposition. but might, possibly, be an early example of ME corbun ‘raven’ (a1300 NED). cf. CORBET.

–  –  –

: Hugo Cordel 12th NthCh (Nth); Margery Cordel 1213 Cur (Nf). OFr cordele: a diminutive of corde ‘cord’. The diminutive is not found in ME, but cf. ME cordilere (c1430) ‘a Franciscan friar of the strict rule’, so called from thc knotted cord round his waist (OFr cordelier).

Corden, Cordon, Cordwent, Corwin

: Robcrt Corduan 1221 AssWo; Walter Kordewan 1296 SRSx; William Cordiwant 1327 SRSo. ME corduan. cordewan, OFr cordoan ‘Spanish leather madc originally at Cordova’, much used Ibr shoes. Metonymic for CORDNER. For forms. cf. corden a1400, corwen 1483, cordiwin 1593 NED.

–  –  –

Corderey, Corderoy, Cordurey, Cordeary, Cordero, Cordery, Cordray, Cordrey : Rober de Querderai c1200 Riev (Y); Hugh Queor de Rey 1246 AssLa: Thomas le

Cordrey 1275 SRWo; Richard GWrar 1287 Fees (Wt); William Corderel 1327 SRWo:



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 41 | 42 || 44 | 45 |   ...   | 125 |


Similar works:

«Soil Stockpiling for Reclamation and Restoration activities after Mining and Construction Patti Strohmayer Stockpiling is a necessary part of civil engineering and mining operations. Stockpiling involves removing the topsoil (the A and B horizon of the soil). The topsoil is usually removed with heavy equipment and then piled in large, deep piles for the duration of the civil engineering or mining project. When the project is complete, the soil is re-spread to allow for the establishment of...»

«WP/04/53 Sovereign Debt Defaults and Financing Needs Mark Kruger and Miguel Messmacher © 2004 International Monetary Fund WP/04/53 IMF Working Paper IMF Executive Director for Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Dominica, Grenada, Ireland, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and IMF Institute Sovereign Debt Defaults and Financing Needs Prepared by Mark Kruger and Miguel Messmacher1 Authorized for distribution by Ian E. Bennett...»

«Centre for Transport Studies News archive 2006 December 2006 Congratulations to Didik Rudjito who successfully defended his PhD dissertation. The topic of his dissertation was The Application of Fuzzy Logic to MultiClassTraffic Assignment in Developing Countries. Dr. Rudjito was supervised by Professor Mike Bell. He will be returning to his post in the Ministry of Public Works in Indonesia. Congratulations to Robin North who successfully defended his PhD dissertation entitled Assessment of...»

«THE QUEENS DAUGHTERS IN INDIA BY ELIZABETH W. ANDREW and KATHARINE C. BUSHNELL With Prefatory Letters by MRS. JOSEPHINE BUTLER and MR. HENRY J. WILSON, M.P. “ Remember them that are in bonds as bound with them.” LONDON. MORGAN AND SCOTT, 12 Paternoster Buildings, E.C. To be obtained from the British Committee of the Federation for the Abolition of State Regulation of Vice 17 Tothill Street, Westminister, S.W., And from the American Purity Alliance, United Charities Building, New York,...»

«BOOKLET ON DAD GUEST HOUSES/ TRANSIT FACILITIES/ HOLIDAY HOMES INDEX Sl No. Location Page 1. Ahmedabad 3 2. Allahabad 4 3. Bengaluru 5 4. Chandigarh 6 5. Chennai 7 6. Dehradun 8 7. Delhi/Gurgaon 9 8. Goa 10 9. Guwahati 11 10. Hyderabad/Secunderabad 12 11. Jabalpur 13 12. Jaipur 14 13. Jammu 15 14. Jodhpur 16 15. Kochi 17 16. Kolkata 18 17. Lansdowne 19 18. Leh 20 19. Lucknow 21 20. Meerut 22 21. Mumbai 23 22. Nashik 24 23. Patna 25 24. Pathankot 26 25. Port Blair 27 26. Pune 28 27. Raniket 29...»

«Improved regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) Phillip A. Wadl Thesis submitted to the faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science In Horticulture Richard E. Veilleux, Chairman Vladimir Shulaev Joel L. Shuman Jeremy Pattison December 14, 2005 Blacksburg, Virginia Keywords: strawberry, Agrobacterium, Fragaria vesca, TDZ, multiplex PCR,...»

«Trading in sexual currency: Transactional sex, sexual coercion and sexual behaviours among young people in Uganda Choudhry, Vikas Published: 01/01/2015 Link to publication Citation for published version (APA): Choudhry, V. (2015). Trading in sexual currency: Transactional sex, sexual coercion and sexual behaviours among young people in Uganda Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University General rights Copyright and moral rights for the publications made accessible in the public portal are...»

«EUROPEAN UNION CONSOLIDATED TREATIES CHARTER OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS MARCH 2010 EN EN 30.3.2010 Official Journal of the European Union C 83/1 T E U CONSOLIDATED VERSIONS T F E U OF THE TREATY ON EUROPEAN UNION AND Pr + THE TREATY ON THE FUNCTIONING An OF THE EUROPEAN UNION ********** CHARTER OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION D e c l C h a r t. Note to the reader This brochure contains the consolidated versions of the Treaty on European Union and of the Treaty on the Functioning of the...»

«The Next Generation Mouthguard Finally: A Custom Fit Boil-and-Bite Mouthguard Without the Need of a Dentist Impression Manese Rabeony, Ph.D. and Monroe Elkin, BS, Pharm. DMD CustMbite Summary This article introduces the latest mouthguard material innovation – the CustMbite MVP – which offers all the positive features of a custom-fabricated mouthguard in a boil-and bite format. Athletes can now fit their own mouthguard – without the assistance of a dentist – which will give a precise,...»

«Handball Goalkeeperthe first steps.1. Introduction 2. The rules of the game for a goalkeeper 3. Terminology in handball 4. Saving a goalbasic rules for a goalkeeper 5. One-to-one: goalkeeper and a shooter 5.1. How to understand a shooter?2. How to save throws from different distances and at different angles?3. How to save a 7-meters throw?6. Other tasks for a goalkeeper 6.1. Counterattack 1. The introduction It is great to be a goalkeeper. He is a member of the team, he has friends, they...»

«FOOT ALUMNI NEWSLETTER 2013 Winter 2014 Dear FOOT Leader Alums, It is February here in New Haven, and guess what? It is snowing! This has been the snowiest winter I can recall, except for our huge storm of last year. But this year it seems to snow every third day. Lots of snow days!! I guess we can call this the year of the wacky weather! FOOT is going strong as ever. I believe this coming August will be our 30th year (if you start counting by how many summer we have actually had trips)! I...»

«A Wild Game Adventure By Helen Goelet “I made a bear-bourguignon the other night,” Wendy says, her blue eyes widening in reminiscence, “and I mean,” she sakes her head, thin lines stretching from the corners of her now closed eyes. She sighs and emits an unknowing moan of play-back pleasure. “That meat, it just melted in my mouth. Just fell apart,” she says. A delicately prideful smile crosses her face as she describes her complex preparation, from searing each cube of the dark...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.