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«P.H.REANEY Litt.D., Ph.D., F.S.A. Third edition with corrections and additions by R.M.WILSON M.A. LONDON AND NEW YORK First published as A Dictionary ...»

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Comines (Nord) is near the Belgian border. Le Prevost’s suggestion that the family came from Bosc-Benard-Commin (Eure) is probably correct. The place is just south of the Seine, on the edge of the Forêt de Rouvray, near Rouen, where Hugh Coumini (1157) and Bernard Comin (1175) held land (France), in the heart of the district from which came numerous Domesday barons. The surname is clearly from a personal-name which, surviving in Norfolk, Lincolnshire and Yorkshire in the 12th and 13th centuries, may be of Breton origin. cf. OBret Cunmin (895 Loth). There was a 7th-century abbot of Iona named Cumin, whilst Woulfe derives the Irish Comyn, Cummin(g) from Ó Coimín or Ó Cuimín ‘descendant of Coimín or Cuimín’, diminutives of cam ‘bent, crooked’. The Scottish Comyns may have owed their name ultimately to a Breton ancestor. cf.

MALLET for evidence of Breton influence in Rouen.

–  –  –

: (i) Walter Curtpeil 1200 Cur (Sf); Roger Curpeil 1210 Cur (Nf); John Curpel (Curtpail, Curpeil) 1221 Cur(Herts); William Corpoyl 1275 SRWo; Robert Coppayl 1381 SR (Ess).

The dictionary 825 OFr curt peil ‘short hair’. cf. Coupals Fm from a family of this name (PN Ess 462). (ii) John de Cophull 1243 InqLa; Robert de Cuphull 1275 SRWo. ‘Dweller by the peaked hill’ (OE copp and hyll) as at Coppul (Lancs).

–  –  –

: Burewoldus Crul 1066 Winton (Ha); Ralph Crul 1191 P (Nf); William Curle 1202 AssL; Roger Crolle 1221 AssSa. ME crull(e), curl(e), ‘curly (hair)’. v. also CROWL.

–  –  –

: (i) Rannulf de Curleio c1110 Winton (Ha); Robert de Curli 1190 P (O); William de Curly 1227–8 FFWa. From Corlay (Côtes-du-Nord, Indre, Saône-et-Loire), or Corlieu, the old name of La-Rue-Saint-Pierre (Oise). (ii) Benedict le Curly 1271 ForSt; Thomas Curly 1332 SRWa; Oliver Curley 1642 PrD. Probably variants of CURLEW.

–  –  –

: William Curaunt c1150 Lichfield (St); John Corant 1260 FFHu. Present participle of OFr courir, ‘running’. For Fr Courant, Dauzat assumes an ellipse for chien courant, a name for a hunter.

–  –  –

: (i) Dodda æt Curi c1075 OEByn (So); Richard de Cury 1212 Fees (So). From Curry (Som). (ii) Robert atte Curie 1327 SRSx, atte Corye 1332 ib.; William Curry ib. OFr curie ‘kitchen’. cf. Curry (PN Ess 210), Petty Cury (PN C 47). (iii) Philip de Curry 1179 Black. From Currie (Midlothian).

Ciirrier, Curryer

: Thurstan conreor c1220 Bart (Lo); Richard le Curur 1256 AssNb; Henry le Coureer The dictionary 827 1281 LLB B; Maurice le couraour 1293 FrY; William le Coureour 1314 LLB D;

William Curreyour, Robert Curreour, John Curreior 1375–6 ColchCt; Andrew Curier 1400 FrY; Robert Curryar 1546 FFHu. Fr couraieur (16th cent), OFr conreeur ‘currier’ (1286 MED), a leather-dresser.

–  –  –

: Walter Curtehose 1210–11 PWi; John Curthose 1287–8 NorwLt; Hugh Curthose 1392 CtH. A nickname, ‘short boots’, OFr curt, hose. The name probably usually fell in with CURTIS. cf. also Geoffrey Curtemanche c1284 Lewes (Nf) ‘short sleeves’; William A dictionary of english surnames 828 Curtbac 1226 Cur (Herts) ‘short back’; Michael Curtcol 1193 P (L) ‘short neck’; Robert Curtesmains 1208 Misc (Lei) ‘short hands’; John Courtpe 1393 FFEss ‘short foot’.

–  –  –

: Robert le Curten 1275 RH (Nf); Robert Curtyn 1311 ColchCt. A diminutive of OFr curt ‘short’. Also for MacCurtin, a metathesized form of MacCruitin ‘son of Cruitin’, the hunch-backed.

–  –  –

: Curteis de Capella 1130 P (Wa); Curteis de Cantebr’ 1200 Cur (C); Richard Curteis 1166 P (Beds); Robert le Curteis 1168 P (D); Ralph le Curtoys 1230 P (L); John le Korteys 1238 Kirkstall (Y); Henry Courteys 1297 MinAcctCo; John Corties 1327 SRSx;

William Curtes 1542 ChwWo; John Curthoise, Edmund Curtice, Curtis 1674 HTSf. OFr corteis. curteis, later cortois, courtois ‘courteous’ (a1300 MED), in feudal society denoting a man of good education. Used also as a personal name.

Curtler, Kirtler

: Geoffrey le Cultelier 1186 P (Ess); William le Curtillier 1199 P (W); Ralph Curtiler 1296 SRSx; William, Roger (le) Corteler 1327 SRSf. OFr cortiller, courtillier, cultilier ‘gardener’; or a derivative of ME curtil ‘kirtle’, a maker of kirtles. cf. Alicia Curtle 1231Cl(D).

–  –  –

: Gilbert de Culewen 1262 Black; William de Colven 1298 CalSc (Dumfries); Gilbert de Colwenn 1332 SRCu; Robert Curwen 1379 PTY; William de Curwen 1388 FrY. From Culewen, now Colvend (Kirkcudbrightshire). The family was early established in Cumberland.

–  –  –

: (i) Robert de Curcon 1086 DB (Nf); Ralph de Curtesun (Curcun) 1127–34 Holme (Nf);

William (de) Cursun 1198 Cur (Nf). From Notre-Dame-de-Courson (Calvados). v. ANF.

(ii) Robert le Curezun 12th Gilb (L); Richard Cursun c1180 DC (L); William le Curcun 1202 FFNf; Katherine la Curzoun 1316 FFEss; Thomas le Curson 1332 FFSf. There has been some confusion in early forms between le and de, but the name was also clearly a nickname from OFr courson, a diminutive of curt ‘short’. cf. courçon, courchon ‘a piece of land shorter than the others’ (Godefroy). Weekley’s alternative suggestion from ‘a cursen man’, i.e. christian as opposed to heathen, is unlikely as this form is not found before the 16th century.





–  –  –

: (i) Robert Custson 1332 SRCu; William Custeson, Richard Cusson 1379 PTY. ‘Son of The dictionary 831 Cust’, i.e. Constance. (ii) Henry Cuttesone 1329 ColchCt. ‘Son of Cutt’, i.e. Cuthbert.

–  –  –

: Custe filia Willelmi 1219 AssY; Cus nepta Johannis Frost 1279 RH (C); Cuss Balla ib.

(Hu); Custa atte Halle 1296 SRSx; Richard Cust 1279 RH (O). Short forms of Custance or Constance. cf. Cussata (Constancia) 1230 P (D).

–  –  –

: Adam Custanson 1379 PTY. ‘Son of Custance.’ cf. Dickinson and Dickerson, Stevenson and Steverson.

A dictionary of english surnames 832

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: Austinus filius Cudberti 1202 P (Y); Laurencius filius Cutberti 1207 FFHu; William Cutbright, Cudbriht 1260 AssC, 1276 RH (C); John Cutbert 1279 RH (Hu); Robert Cudbert 1301 SRY; John Cutberd 1327 SRC; William Cuthbert 1469 FrY. OE Cūðbeorht ‘famous-bright’, a common OE name and popular after the Conquest in the north and the Scottish Lowlands.

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: William Cuttelard 1486 ERO. ‘Cut lard’, OE *cyttan, OFr larde. Probably a nickname for a butcher. Such names are not unusual, but few have survived. cf. Robert Cuttekaple 1247 AssBeds ‘cut horse’; Thomas Cuttegos 1247 AssBeds ‘cut goose’; Alan Cuteharing 1206 AssL ‘cut herring’; Symon Cuttepurs 1275 Burton ‘cutpurse’.

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: Ralph le Cuteiller 1212–23 Bart (Lo); Peter le Cutelir c 1216 Clerkenwell (Lo); Dauid le Cutiller 1219 AssY. OFr coutelier, cotelier ‘cutler’, ‘maker, repairer or seller of knives, etc.’ (c1400 MED).

–  –  –

: Joan Cutloff 1512 AD vi (Y); Francis Cutloffe 1559 SRDb; William Cutlove 1674 HTSf. ‘Cut loaf, OE *cyttan, lāf. Probably a nickname for a baker.

A dictionary of english surnames 834

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: Robert Cutre 1207 Pleas (Ess); Adam Cutter 1379 PTY; Henry Cutter 1674 HTSf. A derivative of OE *cyttan ‘to cut’, perhaps a nickname for a tailor or a barber.

–  –  –

: Ailric Cuterich 1176 P (O); Joan Cudrich 1279 RH (O); William Cutrich 1327 SRSf;

Hugh Coterich 1327 SRSo; William Gutheridge 1597 PN Herts 49; Arthur Gutlerich, Cutterice 1606, 1611 IckworthPR (Sf); William Cutteridge, Widow Cutteris 1674 HTSf;

Marten Gutleridge, Henry Guttrage ib. OE Cūðrīc ‘famous ruler’, a rare OE personal name. Gut(ter)idge is due to late confusion with Goodrich.

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: Herlewin, William Cutting 1221 ElyA (Nf); Richard Cutting 1235 FFEss; William The dictionary 835 Cutton, Cutting 1767, 1775 ShotleyPR (Sf). OE *Cutting ‘son of Cutt’, a pet-form of Cudbeorht or Cudbeald. cf. CUTHBERT, COBBALD.

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: Dacke 1250 AssSt; Alexander Dacke 1275 RH (Nf). Perhaps OE *Dæcca, the first element of Dagenham (Essex), surviving in Hugo filius Decche 12th(L). v. IPN 186.

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: (i) Rannulf de Daker 1212 Cur (Cu); Ralph de Dacre 1272 WhC; William de Dacre 1360 FFY; Richard Dakers 1496 LLB L. From Dacre (Cu, WRY). (ii) Roger de Acra 1201 Pleas (Nf); William de Acre 1281 LLB A; Adam de Acres 1346 LLB F. From Castle, South, West Acre (Nf).

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: Henry Daget 1219 AssY; Peter Dagard 1279 RH (C). Daget is a diminutive of OFr dague ‘dagger’. v. DAGG. cf. Richard Dagun 1203 P (Y), John Dagenet 1185 Templars (Herts), William Dagenet, Dagunet 1210 Cur, 1221 AssWa and the French surnames Dagon, Dagot, Daguet, Dagonet, Daguenet, all ‘carrier of a dagger’ (Dauzat). The ultimate origin of dagger is unsettled. It occurs as daggere a 1375, daggardus 15th, dagard 1535. If the last form could be regarded as original, the word would be OFr dague plus -ard (NED). The 1279 form above suggests that this may be the origin.

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: Peter de Daggingehal 1204 AssY; William de Dagenhale 1260 AssC. From Dagnall in Edlesborough (Bk).

A dictionary of english surnames 840

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: Robert le Dine 1201 P (Sr); Richard le Digne 1222 Cur (Sr); Gilbert le Dyne, Dynes 1275, 1284 Wak (Y); Nicholas Dain 1275 SRWo; Matilda Deine 1279 RH (O); John le Dyen 1296 SRSx. William Dien 1297 MinAcctCo; William le Deyne 1327 SRSx;

Richard, Walter Doyn 1327 SRSx; John Deynes 1327 SRC. (i) ME digne, deyn(e), Fr digne (11th), perhaps OFr *dein ‘worthy, honourable’ (1297 NED); (ii) ME dain(e), OFr *deigne, Burgundian doigne, Fr digne ‘haughty, reserved’ (c1500 NED); (iii) OFr deien, dien, modFr doyen ‘dean’. cf. DEAN. The forms are inextricably confused.

–  –  –

: From Dainton in Ipplepen (D).

Daintree, Daintrey, Daintry, Daventry : Philip de Dauintrie 1162 P (K); Gilbert Dantre 1369 LLB G; Thomas Daintree 1637 Fen DraytonPR (C). From Daventry (Northants), the correct local pronunciation of which is Daintree.

–  –  –

: Osbert Deintie 1199 P (Nth); Henry, William Deinte 1227 AssBk, c1248 Bec (O). ME deinte, OFr deintié, daintié, dainté, sb. ‘pleasure, tit-bit’ (a1225 NED), adj. ‘fine, handsome, pleasant’ (c1340 NED). v. DAINTETH.

–  –  –

: Roger Dayseye 1306–7 FFWa; William Deyseye 1332 PN Sr 287; John Deisy 1534 CorNt. A nickname from the daisy, OE dæges-ēage.

A dictionary of english surnames 842

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: Ralph de la Dale 1275 RH (Sf); William en le Dale 1318 ShefA (Y); John atte Dale 1327 SRSx; Nicholas Daile 1481 FrY. ‘Dweller in the dale’, OE dæl.

–  –  –

: Rannulf Dal 1202 Cur; William Dalle 1275 SRWo; John de Dalle 1362 FFY; John de Dall 1398, John Dall 1419 FrY. Probably usually for DALE, but other sources may also be involved.

A dictionary of english surnames 844

–  –  –

: (i) Roger del Dalhous 1301 SRY; William de Dalhous 1327 SRY. ‘Dweller at the house in the dale.’ (ii) Archibald de Doleys 1262 Black; John de Dolas 1429 ib.; Henry Dalias 1513 ib. From the old barony of Dallas (Moray).

–  –  –

: Bernard de Alencon 1086 DB (Sf); John de Alecon 1189 Whitby (Y); Alexander Dalencun, William Dalizun 13th Lewes (Nf); Nicholas Dalasson 1378 LLB H. From Alengon (Orne). The surname has also contributed to ALLANSON and ALISON.

A dictionary of english surnames 846

–  –  –

: (i) Richard Daly 1275 RH (K); Richard Dally 1293 MPleas (Hu); Richard Daly 1392 CtH; John Daley, Albert Dally 1642 PrD. Perhaps from Ailly (Eure, Meuse, Somme), or from Dally Fm in Forest Row (Sx). (ii) Ir Daly is from Ó Dálaigh, from dáil ‘assembly’.

–  –  –

: Hugh de Dalyhel 1288 Black; James Deell 1684 ib.; James Dyell 1689 ib. From the old barony of Dalziel (Lanarkshire). Also spelled Deyell, De Yell. Pronounced Diyell or DL, sometimes Dal-yell and now also Dalzeel, Dalzell. The old form Dalzel was printed Dalzel, hence the incorrect pronunciation with z instead of y.

Damary, D’Amery, Dammery, Damry, Amori, Amory

: William de Dalmari, de Dalmereio, de Almereio 1086 DB (Do); Richard de Ameri, Dameri 1159, 1166 P (Beds, L); Roger Damery, Dammary, Daimary, de Ammary, de Aumary 1280 AssSo; Roger de Amory, Damori 1274 RH (Bk, O). From Daumeray (Maine-et-Loire). The initial D was often regarded as a preposition and the name wrongly divided as De Aumari. This preposition was then lost, hence Amori, Amory. The name was probably then confused with AMERY.

Dambell

: William Damebele 1303 AssW; John Dambelle 1642 PrD. ‘Lady Bele’, OFr dame, and Bele, a pet-form of Isabel. Such surnames are not uncommon in medieval times, but have rarely survived. cf. Walter Dame Alis 1327 SRWo ‘lady Alice’; Richard Dam Anne 1327 SRSo ‘lady Anne’; Thomas Dameclarice 1332 SRDo ‘lady Clarice’; Walter Damablie 1327 SRSo ‘lady Mabilia’; Cristine Damolde 1277–8 CtH ‘lady Maud’. The probable meaning of such names is ‘servant of the partular lady’.

–  –  –

: Robert de Alba Marula, de Albemarle 1086 DB (D); Reginald de Aumarle 1243 AssSo;

Bernullus de Aumeryl 13th WhC (La); Thomas Damarell 1568 SRSf. From Aumale (Seine-Inférieure), earlier Alba Margila. The fuller form is preserved in the title of the Duke of Albemarle. Hinton Admiral (Hants) preserves the surname without the preposition.

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