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«BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 36-2903 OF THE AIR FORCE 18 JULY 2011 TINKER AIR FORCE BASE Supplement 1 FEBRUARY 2012 Incorporating ...»

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11.5.51. Air Reserve Forces Meritorious Service Medal.

11.5.52. Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal.

11.5.53. Naval Reserve Meritorious Service Medal.

11.5.54. Selected Marine Corps Reserve Medal.

11.5.55. Coast Guard Reserve Good Conduct Medal.

11.5.56. Outstanding Airman of the Year Ribbon.

11.5.57. Air Force Recognition Ribbon.

11.5.58. China Service Medal.

11.5.59. American Defense Service Medal.

11.5.60. Women’s Army Corps Service Medal.

11.5.61. World War II Theater Campaign Medals.

11.5.61.1. American Campaign Medal.

–  –  –

11.5.61.3. Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal.

11.5.61.4. If authorized more than one, wear them in the order earned.

11.5.62. World War II Victory Medal.

11.5.63. Occupation Medal. (Army and Navy) Wear in order earned.

11.5.64. Medal for Humane Action.

11.5.65. National Defense Service Medal.

11.5.66. Korean Service Medal.

11.5.67. Antarctica Service Medal.

11.5.68. Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal.

11.5.69. Vietnam Service Medal.

11.5.70. Southwest Asia Service Medal.

11.5.71. Kosovo Campaign Medal.

11.5.72. Afghanistan Campaign Medal.

11.5.73. Iraq Campaign Medal.

11.5.74. Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal.

11.5.75. Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

11.5.76. Korean Defense Service Medal.

11.5.77. Armed Forces Service Medal.

11.5.78. Humanitarian Service Medal.

11.5.79. Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal.

11.5.80. Air and Space Campaign Medal.

11.5.81. Air Force Overseas Ribbons. (Shorts)

–  –  –

11.5.83. Army Overseas Ribbon.

11.5.84. Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon.

11.5.85. Sea Service Deployment Ribbon. (Navy and Marine) 11.5.86. Coast Guard Special Operations Service Ribbon.

11.5.87. Coast Guard Sea Service Ribbon.

11.5.88. Air Force Longevity Service Ribbon.

11.5.89. Air Force Basic Military Training Instructor Ribbon.

11.5.90. Air Force Recruiter Ribbon.

11.5.91. Reserve Medals. (Armed Forces, Navy and Marines Corps) Wear in order earned.

11.5.92. NCO PME Graduate Ribbon.

11.5.93. Army NCO Professional Development Ribbon.

11.5.94. Air Force BMT Honor Graduate Ribbon.

11.5.95. Coast Guard Reserve Honor Graduate Ribbon.

11.5.96. Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon.

11.5.97. Navy Pistol Shot Medal.

Only authorized by members who served in the US Navy.

11.5.98. Air Force Training Ribbon.

11.5.99. Army Service Ribbon.

11.5.100. Philippine Defense Ribbon.

11.5.101. Philippine Liberation Ribbon.

11.5.102. Philippine Independence Ribbon.

AFI 36-2903_TINKERAFBSUP_I 1 FEBRUARY 2012 161 11.5.103. Merchant Marine Combat Bar.

11.5.104. Merchant Marine War Zone. Wear in order earned.

11.5.104.1. Merchant Marine Atlantic War Zone.

11.5.104.2. Merchant Marine Mediterranean-Middle

–  –  –

11.5.104.3. Merchant Marine Pacific War Zone.

11.5.105. Foreign Decorations. See paragraph 11.2 11.5.106. Philippine Presidential Unit Citation.

11.5.107. Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation.

11.5.108. Other Foreign Unit Citations. See paragraph 11.2 11.5.108.1. Vietnam Gallantry Cross.

11.5.108.2. Vietnam Presidential Unit Citation.

11.5.108.3. Vietnam Wound Medal.

11.5.108.4. RVN Armed Forces Honor Medal.

11.5.108.5. Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation.

11.5.108.6. Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Citations.

11.5.109. United Nations Service Medal.

11.5.110. United Nations Medal.

11.5.111. NATO Medal.

11.5.112. NATO Kosovo Medal.

11.5.113. Multilateral Organization Awards.

11.5.113.1. Multinational Force & Observers Medal.

–  –  –

11.5.113.3. Wear in the other earned and ensure medals are the same size as Air Force ribbons.

11.5.114. Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal.

11.5.115. Kuwait Liberation Medal. (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) 11.5.116. Kuwaiti Liberation Medal. (Government of Kuwait)

–  –  –

Figure 11.1.

Arrangement of Ribbons

11.6. Description of Medals and Ribbons. Miniature medals are approximately ½ the size of regular medals. Note: The Medal of Honor is always regular size. Regular-size ribbons are 1 ⅜ x ⅜ inches and miniature ribbons are 11/16 x ⅜ inches.

11.6.1. Affix ribbons to the uniform using a detachable, metal or plastic clip device.

11.6.2. Keep ribbons clean and unfrayed.

11.6.3. Ribbons will not have a visible protective coating.

164 AFI 36-2903_TINKERAFBSUP_I 1 FEBRUARY 2012 11.6.4. There is no space between the rows of ribbons.

11.7. Devices on Medals and Ribbons. Wear a maximum of four devices on each ribbon.

11.7.1. Wear regular devices on regular medals and regular ribbons. Wear all the same size devices.

11.7.2. Wear miniature devices on miniature medals and miniature ribbons. Wear all the same size devices.

11.7.3. Replace the bronze device with a silver device after receipt of the fifth bronze device.





11.7.4. Place silver devices to the wearer’s right of bronze devices.

11.7.5. Place clusters horizontally and tilt slightly downward to the wearer’s right to allow maximum number of clusters and other devices on the ribbon. Tilt all or none.

11.7.6. On medals, place clusters vertically with silver clusters and stars above similar bronze devices.

11.7.7. If all authorized devices do not fit on a single ribbon, wear a second ribbon. Wear a minimum of three devices on the first ribbon before wearing a second ribbon. When wearing the second ribbon, place after the initial ribbon (on wearer’s left). Both ribbons count for one award. If future awards reduce devices to a single ribbon, remove the second ribbon.

11.7.8. Methods of affixing devices on medals and ribbons.

11.7.8.1. A separate device. When affixing separate devices to a ribbon, center device and space equally.

11.7.8.2. Single-constructed devices (two or more devices manufactured together). If using single-constructed device on one ribbon, use same size device on all ribbons.

Separate devices if the combination of devices authorized is not available as a singleconstructed device. In this event, place the device close to one another so they give the appearance of a single-constructed device as long as the devices are the same; i.e., bronze cluster and silver cluster.

11.7.8.3. Wear only separate devices on medals. Wear maximum of four unless wearing more prevents adding a second medal. Place silver clusters, stars, etc., above similar bronze devices.

11.7.8.4. Wear ribbons awarded by other Services with appropriate devices that Service authorized.

11.7.9. Types of devices.

11.7.9.1. Airplane, C-54 (Gold).

The device is only worn with the Army of Occupation Medal to denote service of 90 consecutive days in direct support of the Berlin Airlift (June 26, 1948 to Sept 30, 1949).

–  –  –

The arrowhead denotes participation in a combat parachute jump, combat glider landing or amphibious assault landing. The arrowhead points up and is worn to the wearer’s right of any service stars. The device is only worn on the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal and the Korean Service Medal.

11.7.9.3. Antarctica Service Medal Clasp and disc.

The Antarctica Service Medal Clasp, with the words “Wintered Over,” is only worn on medal’s suspension ribbon. The discs are authorized for people who stayed on the continent during winter. Bronze - 1 winter, Gold – 2 winters, Silver – 3 winters.

11.7.9.4. Germany and Japan Clasps.

Clasps authorized for wear on the Army of Occupation Medal. The inscriptions “Germany” or “Japan” signify in what area of occupation recipient served.

11.7.9.5. “A” Device.

The “A” device or Arctic Service Device, when worn with oak leaf clusters, is worn to the wearer’s right of such clusters. The device is worn only with the Air Force Overseas Ribbon Short Tour and is authorized for people who completed a short tour north of the Arctic Circle.

11.7.9.6. “M” Device.

The “M” device is only worn with the Armed Forces Reserve Medal to denote active duty status for at least one day during a contingency.

11.7.9.7. “V” Device.

The “V” device represents valor and does not denote an additional award. Only one may be worn on any ribbon. When worn on the same ribbon with clusters, it is worn to the wearer’s right of such clusters.

11.7.9.8. Numeral Device (Bronze).

When worn on the Multinational Force & Observation Medal or Army Air Medal, the device denote repeated decorations of the same award and appears as Arabic block numerals on the medal or ribbon. When worn on the Armed Forces Reserve Medal, the device denotes the number of times mobilized for active duty.

11.7.9.9. Hourglass Device.

The hourglass is only worn with the Armed Forces Reserve Medal in bronze for 10 years of service, silver for 20 years of service and gold for 30 years of service.

11.7.9.10. Bronze and Silver Stars.

The bronze service star represents participation in campaigns or operations multiple qualifications or an additional award to any of the various ribbons on which it is authorized. The 166 AFI 36-2903_TINKERAFBSUP_I 1 FEBRUARY 2012 silver service star is worn in the same manner as the bronze star, but each silver star is worn in lieu of five bronze stars. When worn together on a single ribbon, the silver star(s) will be worn to the wearer’s right of any bronze star(s).

11.7.9.11. Bronze and Silver Oak Leaf Clusters.

The bronze oak leaf cluster represents second and subsequent entitlements of awards. The silver oak leaf cluster represents sixth, 11th, etc., entitlements of in lieu of five bronze oak leaf clusters.

Silver oak leaf clusters are worn to the wearer’s right of any bronze oak leaf clusters on the same ribbon.

11.7.9.12. Palm Tree with Swords.

The device is awarded to Airman who performed duty in support of Operation Desert Storm and the liberation of Kuwait, in the following areas: The Persian Gulf, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, between 17 January 1991 to 28 February 1991. The device is only worn on the Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia).

11.7.9.13. 1960 Bar Date.

The bar displays the date of 1960 followed by a dash and a blank space. The device is issued with the Vietnam Campaign Medal.

11.7.9.14. Palm, (Bronze).

The bronze palm device is worn upon initial issue of the Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation and the Vietnam Civil Actions Unit Citation.

11.7.9.15. The Gold Border.

The gold border/frame is a device for ribbon awards only. Gold borders are not authorized to be attached to medals. Gold border awarded to Airman who participate in combat operations in a designated combat zone.

AFI 36-2903_TINKERAFBSUP_I 1 FEBRUARY 2012 167

Figure 11.2. Placement of Devices on Medals and Ribbons.

11.8. Placement of Medals on Civilian Dress Coat or Jacket.

11.8.1. Civilian Evening Dress (men). Wear miniature medals parallel to the ground on wearer’s left side of coat or jacket and align the top of the suspension medal of the top row with (not above) the top of the pocket.

11.8.2. Civilian Black Tie. Wear miniature medals parallel to the ground on wearer’s left side of coat or jacket and center the holding bar of the bottom row of medals immediately above the pocket.

11.8.3. Wear of miniature medals is designed for a mounting bar.

11.8.4. Do not wear pocket-handkerchief, when wearing medals above the left pocket.

11.8.5. The Medal of Honor is worn in regular-size only, from the neckband ribbon.

168 AFI 36-2903_TINKERAFBSUP_I 1 FEBRUARY 2012

–  –  –

RESERVE, AIR NATIONAL GUARD, RETIRED AND SEPARATED PERSONNEL

12.1. Reserve Personnel.

12.1.1. Reservists on active duty will conform to the same standards of appearance, military customs, practices and conduct in uniform prescribed for active duty members when participating in short or long (extended) periods of active duty, to include active duty training time.

12.1.2. Reservists not on extended active duty.

12.1.2.1. Residing in the U.S., its territories or possessions.

12.1.2.1.1. May wear the uniform when participating in authorized inactive duty training, unit training assemblies or equivalent training.

12.1.2.1.2. May wear the uniform when engaged in military flying activities, including traveling as a passenger on military aircraft.

12.1.2.1.3. May wear the uniform on occasions of military ceremonies.

12.1.2.1.4. May wear the uniform to social functions and informal gatherings of a military nature.

12.1.2.1.5. May wear the uniform when engaged in military instruction.

12.1.2.1.6. May wear the uniform when responsible for military discipline at an educational institution.

12.1.2.2. Residing outside the U.S., its territories or possessions.

12.1.2.2.1. May wear the uniform when authority is granted by the Secretary of the Air Force.

12.1.2.2.2. May wear the uniform at military ceremonies or other functions of a military nature, provided authority is granted; such authority may be obtained by reporting to the nearest military attaché.

12.1.3. An Airman with the Air Force Reserve commission program may wear the uniform of his/her Reserve rank when attending meetings or functions of associations formed for military purposes (membership will be mostly officers or former officers).

12.2. Air National Guard (ANG) Personnel.

12.2.1. IAW Title 10, U.S.C., Section 722. Air National Guard members on active duty will conform to the same standards of appearance, military customs, practices and conduct in uniform prescribed for active duty members when participating in short or long (extended) periods of active duty, to include active duty training time.



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