WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 16 |

«The Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces Contents: Preface I. THE BATTLE OF THE BOOKS II. A MEDITATION UPON A BROOMSTICK. III. PREDICTIONS FOR ...»

-- [ Page 3 ] --

Hippocrates, the dragoons; the allies, led by Vossius and Temple, brought up the rear.

All things violently tending to a decisive battle, Fame, who much frequented, and had a large apartment formerly assigned her in the regal library, fled up straight to Jupiter, to whom she delivered a faithful account of all that passed between the two parties below;

for among the gods she always tells truth. Jove, in great concern, convokes a council in the Milky Way. The senate assembled, he declares the occasion of convening them; a bloody battle just impendent between two mighty armies of ancient and modern creatures, called books, wherein the celestial interest was but too deeply concerned. Momus, the patron of the Moderns, made an excellent speech in their favour, which was answered by Pallas, the protectress of the Ancients. The assembly was divided in their affections; when Jupiter commanded the Book of Fate to be laid before him. Immediately were brought by Mercury three large volumes in folio, containing memoirs of all things past, present, and to come. The clasps were of silver double gilt, the covers of celestial turkey leather, and the paper such as here on earth might pass almost for vellum. Jupiter, having silently read the decree, would communicate the import to none, but presently shut up the book.

Without the doors of this assembly there attended a vast number of light, nimble gods, menial servants to Jupiter: those are his ministering instruments in all affairs below. They travel in a caravan, more or less together, and are fastened to each other like a link of galley-slaves, by a light chain, which passes from them to Jupiter's great toe: and yet, in receiving or delivering a message, they may never approach above the lowest step of his throne, where he and they whisper to each other through a large hollow trunk. These deities are called by mortal men accidents or events; but the gods call them second causes. Jupiter having delivered his message to a certain number of these divinities, they flew immediately down to the pinnacle of the regal library, and consulting a few minutes, entered unseen, and disposed the parties according to their orders.

Meanwhile Momus, fearing the worst, and calling to mind an ancient prophecy which bore no very good face to his children the Moderns, bent his flight to the region of a malignant deity called Criticism. She dwelt on the top of a snowy mountain in Nova Zembla; there Momus found her extended in her den, upon the spoils of numberless volumes, half devoured. At her right hand sat Ignorance, her father and husband, blind with age; at her left, Pride, her mother, dressing her up in the scraps of paper herself had torn. There was Opinion, her sister, light of foot, hoodwinked, and head-strong, yet giddy and perpetually turning. About her played her children, Noise and Impudence, Dulness and Vanity, Positiveness, Pedantry, and Ill-manners. The goddess herself had claws like a cat; her head, and ears, and voice resembled those of an ass; her teeth fallen out before, her eyes turned inward, as if she looked only upon herself; her diet was the overflowing of her own gall; her spleen was so large as to stand prominent, like a dug of the first rate; nor wanted excrescences in form of teats, at which a crew of ugly monsters were greedily sucking; and, what is wonderful to conceive, the bulk of spleen increased faster than the sucking could diminish it. "Goddess," said Momus, "can you sit idly here while our devout worshippers, the Moderns, are this minute entering into a cruel battle, and perhaps now lying under the swords of their enemies? who then hereafter will ever sacrifice or build altars to our divinities? Haste, therefore, to the British Isle, and, if possible, prevent their destruction; while I make factions among the gods, and gain them over to our party."

Momus, having thus delivered himself, stayed not for an answer, but left the goddess to her own resentment. Up she rose in a rage, and, as it is the form on such occasions, began a soliloquy: "It is I" (said she) "who give wisdom to infants and idiots; by me children grow wiser than their parents, by me beaux become politicians, and schoolboys judges of philosophy; by me sophisters debate and conclude upon the depths of knowledge; and coffee-house wits, instinct by me, can correct an author's style, and display his minutest errors, without understanding a syllable of his matter or his language; by me striplings spend their judgment, as they do their estate, before it comes into their hands. It is I who have deposed wit and knowledge from their empire over poetry, and advanced myself in their stead. And shall a few upstart Ancients dare to oppose me? But come, my aged parent, and you, my children dear, and thou, my beauteous sister; let us ascend my chariot, and haste to assist our devout Moderns, who are now sacrificing to us a hecatomb, as I perceive by that grateful smell which from thence reaches my nostrils."

The goddess and her train, having mounted the chariot, which was drawn by tame geese, flew over infinite regions, shedding her influence in due places, till at length she arrived at her beloved island of Britain; but in hovering over its metropolis, what blessings did she not let fall upon her seminaries of Gresham and Covent-garden! And now she reached the fatal plain of St. James's library, at what time the two armies were upon the point to engage;





where, entering with all her caravan unseen, and landing upon a case of shelves, now desert, but once inhabited by a colony of virtuosos, she stayed awhile to observe the posture of both armies.

But here the tender cares of a mother began to fill her thoughts and move in her breast: for at the head of a troup of Modern bowmen she cast her eyes upon her son Wotton, to whom the fates had assigned a very short thread. Wotton, a young hero, whom an unknown father of mortal race begot by stolen embraces with this goddess. He was the darling of his mother above all her children, and she resolved to go and comfort him. But first, according to the good old custom of deities, she cast about to change her shape, for fear the divinity of her countenance might dazzle his mortal sight and overcharge the rest of his senses. She therefore gathered up her person into an octavo compass: her body grow white and arid, and split in pieces with dryness; the thick turned into pasteboard, and the thin into paper; upon which her parents and children artfully strewed a black juice, or decoction of gall and soot, in form of letters: her head, and voice, and spleen, kept their primitive form; and that which before was a cover of skin did still continue so. In this guise she marched on towards the Moderns, indistinguishable in shape and dress from the divine Bentley, Wotton's dearest friend. "Brave Wotton," said the goddess, "why do our troops stand idle here, to spend their present vigour and opportunity of the day? away, let us haste to the generals, and advise to give the onset immediately." Having spoke thus, she took the ugliest of her monsters, full glutted from her spleen, and flung it invisibly into his mouth, which, flying straight up into his head, squeezed out his eye-balls, gave him a distorted look, and half-overturned his brain. Then she privately ordered two of her beloved children, Dulness and Ill-manners, closely to attend his person in all encounters. Having thus accoutred him, she vanished in a mist, and the hero perceived it was the goddess his mother.

The destined hour of fate being now arrived, the fight began;

whereof, before I dare adventure to make a particular description, I must, after the example of other authors, petition for a hundred tongues, and mouths, and hands, and pens, which would all be too little to perform so immense a work. Say, goddess, that presidest over history, who it was that first advanced in the field of battle! Paracelsus, at the head of his dragoons, observing Galen in the adverse wing, darted his javelin with a mighty force, which the brave Ancient received upon his shield, the point breaking in the second fold... HIC PAUCA.... DESUNT

They bore the wounded aga on their shields to hischariot...DESUNT...NONNULLA....

Then Aristotle, observing Bacon advance with a furious mien, drew his bow to the head, and let fly his arrow, which missed the valiant Modern and went whizzing over his head; but Descartes it hit; the steel point quickly found a defect in his head-piece; it pierced the leather and the pasteboard, and went in at his right eye. The torture of the pain whirled the valiant bow-man round till death, like a star of superior influence, drew him into his own vortex INGENS HIATUS....

HIC IN MS.....

.... when Homer appeared at the head of the cavalry, mounted on a furious horse, with difficulty managed by the rider himself, but which no other mortal durst approach; he rode among the enemy's ranks, and bore down all before him. Say, goddess, whom he slew first and whom he slew last! First, Gondibert advanced against him, clad in heavy armour and mounted on a staid sober gelding, not so famed for his speed as his docility in kneeling whenever his rider would mount or alight. He had made a vow to Pallas that he would never leave the field till he had spoiled Homer of his armour: madman, who had never once seen the wearer, nor understood his strength! Him Homer overthrew, horse and man, to the ground, there to be trampled and choked in the dirt. Then with a long spear he slew Denham, a stout Modern, who from his father's side derived his lineage from Apollo, but his mother was of mortal race.

He fell, and bit the earth. The celestial part Apollo took, and made it a star; but the terrestrial lay wallowing upon the ground.

Then Homer slew Sam Wesley with a kick of his horse's heel; he took Perrault by mighty force out of his saddle, then hurled him at Fontenelle, with the same blow dashing out both their brains.

On the left wing of the horse Virgil appeared, in shining armour, completely fitted to his body; he was mounted on a dapple-grey steed, the slowness of whose pace was an effect of the highest mettle and vigour. He cast his eye on the adverse wing, with a desire to find an object worthy of his valour, when behold upon a sorrel gelding of a monstrous size appeared a foe, issuing from among the thickest of the enemy's squadrons; but his speed was less than his noise; for his horse, old and lean, spent the dregs of his strength in a high trot, which, though it made slow advances, yet caused a loud clashing of his armour, terrible to hear. The two cavaliers had now approached within the throw of a lance, when the stranger desired a parley, and, lifting up the visor of his helmet, a face hardly appeared from within which, after a pause, was known for that of the renowned Dryden. The brave Ancient suddenly started, as one possessed with surprise and disappointment together; for the helmet was nine times too large for the head, which appeared situate far in the hinder part, even like the lady in a lobster, or like a mouse under a canopy of state, or like a shrivelled beau from within the penthouse of a modern periwig; and the voice was suited to the visage, sounding weak and remote.

Dryden, in a long harangue, soothed up the good Ancient; called him father, and, by a large deduction of genealogies, made it plainly appear that they were nearly related. Then he humbly proposed an exchange of armour, as a lasting mark of hospitality between them.

Virgil consented (for the goddess Diffidence came unseen, and cast a mist before his eyes), though his was of gold and cost a hundred beeves, the other's but of rusty iron. However, this glittering armour became the Modern yet worsen than his own. Then they agreed to exchange horses; but, when it came to the trial, Dryden was afraid and utterly unable to mount... ALTER HIATUS.... IN MS.

Lucan appeared upon a fiery horse of admirable shape, but headstrong, bearing the rider where he list over the field; he made a mighty slaughter among the enemy's horse; which destruction to stop, Blackmore, a famous Modern (but one of the mercenaries), strenuously opposed himself, and darted his javelin with a strong hand, which, falling short of its mark, struck deep in the earth.

Then Lucan threw a lance; but AEsculapius came unseen and turned off the point. "Brave Modern," said Lucan, "I perceive some god protects you, for never did my arm so deceive me before: but what mortal can contend with a god? Therefore, let us fight no longer, but present gifts to each other." Lucan then bestowed on the Modern a pair of spurs, and Blackmore gave Lucan a bridle....

PAUCA DESUNT....

....

Creech: but the goddess Dulness took a cloud, formed into the shape of Horace, armed and mounted, and placed in a flying posture before him. Glad was the cavalier to begin a combat with a flying foe, and pursued the image, threatening aloud; till at last it led him to the peaceful bower of his father, Ogleby, by whom he was disarmed and assigned to his repose.

Then Pindar slew -, and - and Oldham, and -, and Afra the Amazon, light of foot; never advancing in a direct line, but wheeling with incredible agility and force, he made a terrible slaughter among the enemy's light-horse. Him when Cowley observed, his generous heart burnt within him, and he advanced against the fierce Ancient, imitating his address, his pace, and career, as well as the vigour of his horse and his own skill would allow. When the two cavaliers had approached within the length of three javelins, first Cowley threw a lance, which missed Pindar, and, passing into the enemy's ranks, fell ineffectual to the ground. Then Pindar darted a javelin so large and weighty, that scarce a dozen Cavaliers, as cavaliers are in our degenerate days, could raise it from the ground; yet he threw it with ease, and it went, by an unerring hand, singing through the air; nor could the Modern have avoided present death if he had not luckily opposed the shield that had been given him by Venus. And now both heroes drew their swords;



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 16 |


Similar works:

«AdHoc Senate Committee on Student Textbook Savings Recommendations to Save on Student Textbook Costs Prepared by The Adhoc Senate Committee on Student Textbook Savings April 27, 2014 FINAL REPORT 1 of 47 AdHoc Senate Committee on Student Textbook Savings Executive Summary The cost of college textbooks is an unreasonable burden on many students, and adds considerably to the expense of their education. The difficulties that many students experience in paying for course materials can...»

«French Faculty Publications French Fall 2011 Protest or Riot?: Interpreting Collective Action in Contemporary France John P. Murphy Gettysburg College Follow this and additional works at: http://cupola.gettysburg.edu/frenchfac Part of the International and Area Studies Commons, and the Social and Cultural Anthropology Commons Share feedback about the accessibility of this item. Murphy, J. P. (2011). Protest or Riot?: Interpreting Collective Action in Contemporary France. Anthropological...»

«Macular Degeneration 101 December 17, 2014 Transcript of Teleconference NARRATOR: This audio presentation was pre-recorded and edited for brevity and clarity. GUY EAKIN: Hello, everyone, and welcome to our monthly Bright Focus Chat presented by the Bright Focus Foundation. My name is Guy Eakin. I’m the Vice President of Scientific Affairs at Bright Focus. Today we have a returning guest, Dr. Milam Brantley from Vanderbilt University. Milam is a clinician scientist, and I have to say that on...»

«Opinion, Assertion and Knowledge: Kantian Epistemic Modalities1 Maria van der Schaar 1. Introduction In this paper I argue that the modern notion of belief is not apt for the explanation of the concept of knowledge: knowledge just is not a special case of belief. My proposal is to substitute the notion of judgement for that of belief in the explanation of knowledge. Eventually, knowledge is explained as evident judgement, as in the writings of Per Martin-Löf. How belief relates to other...»

«Page 1 of 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS.. EDITORIAL NOTE.. OFFICIAL CC>CC GRADE & CONDITION DESCRIPTIONS. CALIFORNIA INDIAN CHIP COLLECTING – GEORGE DMITREVSKY.1 CASINO DRINK GLASSES – MARK ENGLEBRETSON..2 CASINO MATCHBOOKS – DON LUEDERS..3-4 CASINO TOKENS – RON CLEWELL..5 COLLECTING CASINO MEMORABILIA AT YARD, GARAGE & ESTATE SALES RAULIN MENDONCA..6 COLLECTING MATCH COVERS – RAULIN MENDONCA.7 DISPLAYS – MICHAEL DOWNEY..8 FIRST CONVENTION, MAKE THE MOST OF IT! MIKE PASTERNACK...9-11...»

«1 Ludwigsburg Übersicht über die Ludwigsburger Synagogen o seit 1739: Betsaal in einem Privathaus (Standort unbekannt) o 1817 oder erst 1824 bis 1.9.1883: Synagoge im Hintergebäude des Hauses Mömpelgardstraße 18 (Haus der Familie Wolf Jordan) o 1.9.1883 bis 19.12.1884: Betsaal im Haus der Familie Elsas Marstallstraße 4 o 19.12.1884 (Einweihung) bis 10.11.1938 (Zerstörung) der neuen Synagoge Ecke Alleenund Solitudestraße (neue Synagoge) o Ende Januar 1939 bis April 1942: Betsaal im Haus...»

«PERIODS OF ORBITS MODULO PRIMES AMIR AKBARY AND DRAGOS GHIOCA Abstract. Let S be a monoid of endomorphisms of a quasiprojective variety V defined over a global field K. We prove a lower bound for the size of the reduction modulo places of K of the orbit of any point α ∈ V (K) under the action of the endomorphisms from S. We also prove a similar result in the context of Drinfeld modules. Our results may be considered as dynamical variants of Artin’s primitive root conjecture. 1....»

«Redesigning Distribution_Ackerman.qxd 8/3/2005 17:50 Page 7 Basic Income: A simple and powerful idea for the twenty-first century* Philippe Van Parijs Give all citizens a modest, yet unconditional income, and let them top it up at will with income from other sources. This exceedingly simple idea has a surprisingly diverse pedigree. In the course of the last two centuries, it has been independently thought up under a variety of names – “territorial dividend” and “state bonus,” for...»

«www.alpenverein.li Liechtensteiner ALpenverein 2013 B E R G H E I M AT 2013 B E R G H E I M AT B E R G H E I M AT 2013 Herausgeber: Liechtensteiner Alpenverein Steinegerta 26, FL-9494 Schaan T +423 232 98 12, F +423 232 98 13 info@alpenverein.li, www.alpenverein.li Redaktion: Pio Schurti, Triesen Gestaltungsgrundlage: Mathias Marxer, Gregor Schneider Visuelle Gestaltung, Triesen Satz und Druck: Lampert Druckzentrum AG, Vaduz Einband und Bindung: Buchbinderei Thöny AG, Vaduz Bildnachweis: Die...»

«Hak Cipta Terpelihara © 2012 – Persatuan Sejarah Malaysia PERSEKUTUAN TANAH MELAYU MERDEKA, 31 OGOS 1957: LIKU DAN JEJAK PERJUANGAN PATRIOT DAN NASIONALIS MENENTANG BRITISH Abdullah Zakaria Ghazali* Pendahuluan Pada tahun ini, 31 Ogos 2012, genaplah 55 Persekutuan Tanah Melay (kini dikenali sebagai Malaysia) mencapai kemerdekaan. Sepanjang 55 tahun tersebut Malaysia mengalami berbagai pancaroba. Namun begitu. Malaysia terus menerus mencapai kemajuan dalam bcrbagai bidang. politk, ekonomi dan...»

«CONTRAT URBAIN DE COHESION SOCIALE Ville de Sartrouville CUCS 15032007 1 PARTIE I : LA DEFINITION DU PROJET, A / UNE VILLE QUI S'EST DEVELOPPEE s RAPIDEMENT B/ UNE ATTENTION PARTICULIERE SUR DEUX QUARTIERS DE SARTROUVILLE 1 0 Le Plateau : 1 0 Le quartier du Vieux pays : 1 C/ UN PROJET URBAIN DE COHESION SOCIALE GLOBAL ET COHERENT AVEC LES DISPOSITIFS EXISTANTS 14 Sartrouville, membre engagé au sein de la Communauté de communes de la Boucle de la Seine : 14 Sartrouville maîtrise son...»

«chapter 1 Childhood and Adolescence France, 1748–1759... The liaison between Charles Carroll of Annapolis and his cousin Elizabeth Brooke (1709–1761) that produced the son who became Charles Carroll of Carrollton began in the mid-1730s. A daughter of Prince George’s County planter Clement Brooke, Sr. (1676–1737), and his wife Jane Sewall Brooke (1680–1761), Elizabeth had become a member of the Carrolls’ Annapolis household sometime between 1726 and 1730,1 perhaps as a companion...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.