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«High Five: Unit C / Table of Contents Introduction 3 How High Five Lesson Plans Are Organized 5 Unit C Lesson Plans and Activity Pages Building ...»

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Background Now that the newspaper has been published and distributed, students must solicit feedback from readers to determine how well they met goals and objectives.

In this lesson, students will develop, disseminate and tabulate a questionnaire for a sample of their readers. The size of the sample will be determined by the total number of readers and should reflect their audience. Questions should be framed to provide students useful feedback. A sample list of questions is provided.

Media required Copies of the newspaper for each student.

Instructions

1. Allow students several minutes to read newspapers at the beginning of class.

2. Discuss with students the need to have feedback from readers about how well they met goals and objectives.

3. Explain that a sample survey of readers that reflects their audience should provide the kind of information they desire. As a class, determine the size and composition of their sample group.

4. Assign students into departments or teams and have them develop three to five questions they would like to ask readers.

5. Bring the class together and have each group share questions. Revise as necessary and agree on survey questions that include references to each department.

6. Determine how and when the questionnaire will be disseminated, collected and the results tabulated.

7. Implement the survey plan.

High Five Unit C: Page 152 Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

–  –  –

Lesson 26 Activity Page

GET FEEDBACK

Name __________________________________________________________________

Directions: Use this worksheet to help you write questions about how well your department did its job in publishing your newspaper.

1. I worked in the ______________________________department.

2. The most important thing I want to learn from my readers is _____________________

_______________________________________________________________________.

3. My first question is _____________________________________________________

because it will help me to know _____________________________________________.

4. My second question is ___________________________________________________

because it will help me to know _____________________________________________.

5. My third question is ____________________________________________________

because it will help me to know _____________________________________________.

6. My fourth question is ____________________________________________________

because it will help me to know _____________________________________________.

7. My fifth question is _____________________________________________________

–  –  –

Lesson 26 Resource

SAMPLE SURVEY QUESTIONS

1. Why did you read the newspaper?

2. What did you think about how the newspaper looked? What got your attention? Why?

What was distracting? Why?

3. What news stories or editorials did you like? Why? What news stories or editorials did you not like? Why?

4. What features did you like? Why? What features did you not like? Why?

5. What advertisements appealed to you? Why? What advertisements did not? Why?

6. What photos or graphics appealed to you? Why? What photos or graphics did not?

Why?

7. What would you like to see in a second edition of the newspaper? Why?

8. How did you learn that the newspaper would be available?

9. How did you obtain your copy of the newspaper? What made it convenient to get one?

What made it difficult?

–  –  –

Lesson 27

USE FEEDBACK

Objectives

Students will:

1. Evaluate survey data

2. Use survey data to modify a possible second edition.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Text Types and Purposes

1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration

2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.





College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Knowledge of Language

3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

High Five Unit C: Page 156 Related Lessons: Unit A, Lessons 4, 5, 22, 25, 26.

Skills—Knowledge: tell; Comprehension: interpret, predict; Application: show;

Analysis: explain; Synthesis: propose; Evaluation: recommend.

Vocabulary: data.

Looking Ahead You will be using survey data in this lesson. Surveys should have been returned and the data tabulated.

Background Self-assessment and survey data should offer students a thorough assessment of their experience and performance. It also should make them more informed and sophisticated media consumers and producers.

In this lesson, students will review, analyze and respond to survey data. This information can be used in conjunction with their self-assessment to identify and reflect on lessons learned about every phase of Unit C—preparation, planning, processes and implementation. It is hoped that students also can assess their departmental and individual contributions to the newspaper’s success.

Media required Copies of the newspaper for each student.

Instructions

1. Allow students several minutes to read newspapers at the beginning of class.

2. Have those who tabulated survey data distribute copies of their findings.

3. Review and analyze the data with the class, question by question.

4. Elicit responses about how the data compares and contrasts with their selfassessments. Discuss.

5. Have students identify suggestions from the data that could be included in a second edition. List them on the board.

High Five Unit C: Page 157

6. Have students explain reasons for accepting, modifying or rejecting the data findings.

Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

–  –  –

Lesson 28

OUR PROJECT AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT

Objectives

Students will:

1. Be familiar with the meaning of the First Amendment to the Constitution

2. Understand why freedom of the press is important in a democracy

3. Review the freedom of the press statement of their publication

4. Identify challenges to and support of freedom of the press in school publications.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Text Types and Purposes

1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

High Five Unit C: Page 159 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Related Lessons: Unit A, Lesson 19; Unit B Lessons 5, 7.

Skills— Knowledge: state; Comprehension: explain; Application: show; Analysis:

compare; Synthesis: imagine; Evaluation: discuss.

Vocabulary: censorship, First Amendment, Constitution.

Background Students have read about and experienced publishing a newspaper. It is appropriate for them now to reflect on the First Amendment and how it applies to what they have learned and done. You may wish to refer to Unit B, Lesson 5 and the discussion about potential challenges and lessons as they prepared to publish a newspaper.

First Amendment to the Constitution Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

High Five Unit C: Page 160 Here are the principles on which the First Amendment is based. You may wish to use them as the basis of your class discussion.

1. The government must have boundaries in its attempts to control rights of citizens to express themselves.

2. Democracy can survive only if there is freedom of expression.

3. Everyone has rights.

4. Sometimes, the government must intervene when the rights of citizens conflict.

5. The First Amendment requires that we make decisions about how we express ourselves.

Media required  Copies of the newspaper for each student  Copy of the First Amendment.

Instructions

1. Allow students several minutes to read newspapers at the beginning of class.

2. Display or distribute a copy of the First Amendment and review rights it guarantees to citizens.

3. Lead a discussion about why it is important to have and protect freedom of the press in a democracy.

4. Ask students to identify the lesson(s) they learned about press freedom from their experience and how well their press freedom statement from Unit B, Lesson 5 helped to guide their work.

5. You may wish to refer to the five principles to help frame a discussion about how press freedom was reflected in publishing their newspaper and to discuss challenges or issues of press freedom that might have been raised.

6. Ask students to identify ways in which the local newspaper fulfills its role as watchdog and provides the kind of information citizens need to make informed decisions. Discuss.

7. Draw a Venn diagram on the board. Have students identify how their newspaper was received in school and compare that with the local newspaper’s role in the community.

Discuss.

High Five Unit C: Page 161

8. Distribute the activity page. Review directions with students.

9. Assign Our Project and The First Amendment as an in-class activity or homework.

Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Revisit Student identifies freedoms named in the First Amendment.

Student can articulate reasons to protect freedom of the press.

Student explains implications of the class press freedom statement and publishing its newspaper.

Student identifies challenges to and support for protecting press freedom for local and school publications.

High Five Unit C: Page 162 Lesson 28 Activity Page

OUR NEWSPAPER AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT

Name __________________________________________________________________

Directions: Write a brief essay on what you learned about freedom of the press as a result of publishing your newspaper. Think about the kind of news and information you provided readers, why it was important and challenges you might have faced in deciding what stories or images to include. Use the five principles of the First Amendment discussed in class to help organize your thoughts.



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