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«High Five: Unit C / Table of Contents Introduction 3 How High Five Lesson Plans Are Organized 5 Unit C Lesson Plans and Activity Pages Building ...»

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8. Use student responses to The Right Stuff as a basis for their “job interviews” and subsequent assignment(s) for the project.

High Five Unit C: Page 12 Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

–  –  –

Lesson 1 Activity Page

THE RIGHT STUFF

Name__________________________________________________________________

Directions: Creating a newspaper requires teamwork and a staff with many different interests and skills. Use this list to check things you do well and things about which you want to learn more or do for your class or school newspaper. You and your teacher will use your answers to decide which job on the newspaper staff is best for you.

Interests and skills Very Interested Not very Very Good Need interested interested good help Working on a team Working alone Creating or doing puzzles Organizing projects Word processing, typing Doing research Making sure grammar, spelling and punctuation are correct Talking to people and asking questions Convincing others of my point of view Selling products and meeting people What is happening at school What is happening in my community Sports TV, movies, video games, DVDs (circle one) Music Fashion, food (circle one) Taking pictures Drawing cartoons, pictures Creating graphics, charts Other interests:__________________________________________________________.

Other skills: ____________________________________________________________.

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Lesson 2

HOW DO THEY COMPARE?

Objectives

Students will:

1. Become familiar with content and features of an out-of-town newspaper

2. Identify and describe various types of writing (news, opinion and feature) in a newspaper

3. Identify and describe different writing genres (persuasive, descriptive, condensed, informal, analytical, dialogue) in a newspaper.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Key Ideas and Details

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Craft and Structure

5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge

7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

High Five Unit C: Page 15

9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Use

6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Related Lessons: Unit A, Lessons 10, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21; Unit B, Lessons 1, 12, 14; Unit C, Lesson 23.

Skills—Knowledge: locate; Comprehension: compare, describe; Application:

complete; Analysis: compare, contrast; Synthesis: predict; Evaluation: rate.

Vocabulary: classified ad, cutline, display ad, editorial, feature story, genre, headline, inverted pyramid, news, opinion column, letter to the editor, persuasive, review, syndicated feature.

Looking Ahead Target Date requires advance planning. The following Web site offers students contact information for newspapers nationwide: www.usnpl.com.

–  –  –

return address in the letter. Allow at least two weeks for delivery. Check whether any of the newspapers charge a fee. Pairs or small groups can share a newspaper.

Requesting newspapers and sending thank-you notes can provide students with lessons in letter-writing and should follow standards for correspondence. Be sure to let someone in the office know that many newspapers will be mailed to you.





NOTE: Target Date newspapers will be used again in Lesson 3. In Lesson 26, students will explore online newspapers. You may want to keep the out-of-town newspapers and use them to compare with the online versions.

Background Target Date has long been a standard Newspaper In Education activity. In it, several newspapers published on the same date are analyzed and compared. You may choose to collect newspapers of different circulation sizes from your area, region, state or across the country. If you buy out-of-town newspapers locally, check to see where they can be purchased and whether they will be available on your Target Date. Some outlets only carry Sunday editions.

Media required  Copies of the newspaper for each student on the Target Date selected  Copies of the out-of-town newspapers requested on the Target Date.

Instructions

1. Distribute the out-of-town and local newspapers. Assign pairs or small groups to share a copy. Have students write their names on the newspaper.

2. Allow time for them to read the newspaper and become familiar with its organization and content.

3. As a class, discuss similarities and differences among the Target Date newspapers in page one headlines and photos, section types and names, and syndicated features (comics, advice columns, etc.) High Five Unit C: Page 17

4. Ask students what they like best about their out-of-town newspaper and why.

5. Review with students the different types of writing in the newspaper—news, opinion and feature and their characteristics.

6. Review the different writing genres in the newspaper—persuasive, descriptive, condensed, informal, analytical and dialogue.

7. Have students say where each genre might be found in the newspaper.

8. Before students begin their scavenger hunt, have them neatly reassemble their newspaper.

9. Distribute the activity page. Review directions with students.

10. Have students return to their pair or small group and allow time to complete What’s in the Newspaper?

11. Have students neatly reassemble their newspaper.

12. Call the class together and have volunteers share examples of each type and genre of writing from their scavenger hunt. Help students understand that all newspapers include the same writing types and genres.

13. You may want to have students create a bulletin board or scrapbook of their findings.

High Five Unit C: Page 18 Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

–  –  –

Lesson 2 Activity Page WHAT’S IN THE NEWSPAPER?

Name _________________________________________________________________

Directions: Working with a partner or in a small group, find in each section of your Target Date and local newspapers an example of the following types of writing and genre in both papers. Use a marker or crayon and circle it. Remember to write down the page number. Be ready to share findings and explain choices with the class.

Newspaper name _____________________________________________________

City and state _________________________________________________________

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Lesson 3

GETTING THE READER’S ATTENTION

Objectives

Students will:

1. Identify the five elements of newspaper design—headlines, text, photos or graphics, cutlines and advertisements

2. Analyze effective application of each element.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Craft and Structure

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Production and Distribution of Writing

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

High Five Unit C: Page 21 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Knowledge of Language

3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Related Lessons: Unit A, Lessons 9, 23,26; Unit B, Lessons 2, 3.

Skills—Knowledge: locate; Comprehension: describe; Application: classify, examine;

Analysis: compare, contrast; Synthesis: predict; Evaluation: rate; justify.

Vocabulary: brief, cutline, digest, graphic, headline, photo, pullout quote, spot color, text.

Looking Ahead The following Web site features archived front pages from newspapers nationwide at a reasonable price: http://www.newseum.org/todaysfrontpages/. You may want to contact your local newspaper to see whether its archives department can provide help.

Background Media consumers have many sources from which to choose—newspapers, magazines, television, radio and the Internet. Competition among them is fierce. Print publications, especially newspapers, have changed dramatically in the past 20 years.

Today’s newspapers use a variety of devices to attract readers visually—modular layouts (rectangular blocks rather than vertical columns), graphics (charts, pullout quotes) giving the reader several points of entry into a page, color (spot and full), type, images and photos, headlines, and digests and briefs (short articles that summarize).

Although designing a newspaper is complex, five elements used in newspaper design can be identified—headlines, text, photos or graphics, cutlines and advertisements.

Media required  Copies of the newspaper for each student  Target Date newspapers from Lesson 2 High Five Unit C: Page 22  A front page from a newspaper at least 15 to 20 years old, if possible.

Instructions

1. Ask students what draws their attention to a newspaper page. Elicit responses such as color, type size, headlines, images and graphics. Explain how much competition exists among print media to grab a reader’s attention.

2. Explain or illustrate by showing the front page from a newspaper at least 15 to 20 years old how different newspapers look today. Have students compare and contrast the sample with page one of the day’s newspaper.

3. Explain that computers and design programs have had a great impact on how newspapers look and how newspapers can be written, designed and assembled much more quickly than just 20 years ago.

4. Tell students that they will be looking through their Target Date newspapers again but focusing now on design elements. Explain that this will provide examples and ideas for their class or school newspaper.

5. Distribute Target Date newspapers to the same or different pairs or groups from the previous day’s activity.

6. Allow students time to scan their Target Date newspapers, focusing attention on design elements.

7. Distribute the activity page. Review directions with students.

8. Allow time to complete the Getting the Reader’s Attention or assign it as homework.

9. Call the class together and have volunteers share examples of each design element found in their scavenger hunt. Discuss effectiveness of the examples. Lead students to understand that all newspapers include the same elements and may apply them in a variety of ways.

10. You may have students create a bulletin board or scrapbook of their findings.

11. Allow students several minutes to read the local newspaper.

High Five Unit C: Page 23 Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

–  –  –

Lesson 3 Activity Page

GETTING THE READER’S ATTENTION



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