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«High Five: Unit C / Table of Contents Introduction 3 How High Five Lesson Plans Are Organized 5 Unit C Lesson Plans and Activity Pages Building ...»

-- [ Page 7 ] --

1. Become familiar with functions and use of a digital or other type of camera

2. Become familiar with importing or scanning images

3. Understand application of one or more principles of media literacy to use of photographs or other images in newspapers

4. Understand standards of ethical behavior for photojournalists.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Production and Distribution of Writing

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration

2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

High Five Unit C: Page 70 Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Knowledge of Language

3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Related Lessons: Unit A, Lessons 1, 4; Unit B, Lesson 8.

Skills—Knowledge: locate, name; Comprehension: explain; Application: use;

Analysis: identify, explain; Synthesis: create; Evaluation: argue.

Vocabulary: import, photo illustration, photo journalist, photoshopping, scan.

Background NOTE: This lesson will vary based on accessibility of a digital or other camera and scanner. Photos from other than digital cameras also can be used and the images scanned and imported. If necessary, you may arrange for someone knowledgeable about use of digital or other cameras and how to import photos to assist or lead class instruction.

Students must learn to be knowledgeable users and consumers of technology and understand various ways it can be used and manipulated. This lesson builds on earlier

lessons on principles of media literacy:

1. All messages are constructions.

2. All messages are representations of a reality.

3. Messages are created for different purposes.

4. Different people will interpret messages differently.

5. Messages have their own language, form and symbols.

–  –  –

 Digital, disposable or other easy-to-use cameras  Computer(s)  Scanner (depending on camera and source of images)  PowerPoint  LCD or overhead projector.

Instructions

1. The following activities may need to be completed in small groups, individually or as a class over one or more periods. Directions that follow are generic and should be adapted to the camera, hardware and software used.

2. Allow students time to look through the newspaper. Call special attention to the type, quality and use of photographs.

3. Explain to students that they will practice basics of creating and placing art elements and photographs in their newspaper. Discuss problems and successes as students take each step.

4. Before working with cameras and imaging software, take time to discuss the ethics of photograph and image use. Recall with students the ethical standards for reporters discussed in an earlier lesson. Explain that news photographers or photojournalists also must adhere to ethical standards of behavior.

5. Discuss with students circumstances under which a photograph should not be used and who is responsible at a newspaper for deciding what photos to use and where to use them.

Lead a discussion in which students reflect on questions such as:

 Do certain kinds of photos reflect complicated attitudes and issues?

 Are certain images understood differently by different audiences or groups?

 Is the purpose of the photo clear?

6. Explain that digital imaging hardware and software is very affordable and that manipulating images has become much more commonplace and difficult to detect.

Altering photos is referred to as photoshopping, a word derived from Adobe PhotoShop, a popular graphics editing program. If a photo has been altered, the photographer must label it as a “photo illustration.” Help students become familiar with issues involved

when they create images for school newspaper by asking:

High Five Unit C: Page 72  Where did this photo come from? Do I have permission to use it?

 Why do I want to change this photo?





 How would the reader respond or interpret this photo?

 How would the reader react or interpret this photo without editing?

 Is the photo supposed to reflect the truth, or is it art?

7. Assign students to small groups and review functions of camera(s) students will use.

You may wish to develop instructions on a PowerPoint program and project it with an LCD, use an overhead projector or distribute handouts.

8. Allow students time to practice taking photos.

9. Following instructions from the camera and software, import or scan the photos to a computer.

10. Distribute the activity page. Review directions with students.

11. Have students complete Technology Basics II as homework or an in-class assignment.

High Five Unit C: Page 73 Assessment  Exceeds Expectations—Student performance far exceeds minimal level of performance.

 Meets Expectations—Criterion is met at a minimal level.

 Revisit—Criterion is not met. Student responses are too weak or unfocused to be acceptable.

–  –  –

Lesson 12 Activity Page

TECHNOLOGY BASICS II

Name __________________________________________________________________

Directions: For each item, check the answer that best describes how you did taking photographs and scanning or importing them. Use your answers to help decide where you need more practice.

I used a __________________ camera and ________________software.

1. Taking a picture o I was able to take a photograph with little or no problem.

o I had to try more than once to take a photograph.

o I need practice in taking a photograph.

2. Importing or scanning a photograph o I was able to import or scan a photograph with little or no problem.

o I had to try more than once to import or scan a photograph.

o I need practice to import or scan a photograph.

3. One thing a photographer must remember when taking photos is to ______________

______________________________________________________________________.

4. One thing that affects whether a photograph is used in the newspaper is ___________ ______________________________________________________________________.

5. The most important lesson I learned from this activity was ______________________

–  –  –

Lesson 13

SHOW ME THE MONEY

Objectives

Students will:

1. Identify financial resources needed to publish a newspaper

2. Review advertising’s role in a newspaper.

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Craft and Structure

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing Text Types and Purposes

1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Production and Distribution of Writing

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

High Five Unit C: Page 76 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration

1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Conventions of Standard English

1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Related Lessons: Unit A, Lessons 24, 25; Unit B, Lessons 4, 24, 25, 26; Unit C, Lesson 9.

Skills—Knowledge: describe; Comprehension: explain; Application: show; Analysis:

identify, explain; Synthesis: formulate; Evaluation: justify.

Vocabulary: agate, column inch, classified ad, display ad, news hole, preprints, rate card, run of press.

Looking Ahead Some classroom and school newspapers are produced as part of regular assignments, and the school assumes the cost of publishing. In some cases, outside funding is necessary.

Before selling advertisements and newspapers, determine whether a school policy exists about such activities for students. Clear fundraising activity with your administrator.

–  –  –

Background At this point, students should have a good understanding of what is required to publish and distribute a newspaper. They also must learn and experience, in some way, the economics of creating and distributing a product.

The number of pages in a newspaper is determined not by the newsroom but by the amount of advertising sold for that day. As a rule, newspapers print slightly more advertising than news. Ads may fill 60 percent or more of a newspaper. The ratio of ads to news must be high because newspapers cannot stay in business without advertising revenue. The space for editorial content is called the news hole. The advertising and editorial departments do not influence each other’s content.

The three types of newspaper advertising are:

• Display ads—With photos and graphics, these can cost thousands of dollars depending on size and the newspaper’s circulation. Generally placed by department stores, movie theaters and other businesses, display ads may be prepared by an advertising agency or the newspaper ad department. They are called run-of-press ads and produce the most revenue.

• Classified ads—Often called “want ads,” these appear in a small typeface called agate. Individuals trying to buy or sell items, businesses seeking workers and/or tradespeople offering services buy classified ads. These ads are affordable, popular and highly effective in reaching potential customers.

• Inserts—Large national chain stores often use this form. Inserts, or preprints, are delivered to newspapers in bundles for local distribution and placed in newspapers after they come off the press. Newspapers charge for distributing inserts and have no control over their content or print quality.

–  –  –

Media required  Copies of the newspaper for each student.

Instructions

1. Allow students several minutes to read newspapers at the beginning of class.

Encourage them to pay particular attention to the type, location and number of advertisements.

2. Discuss students’ observations about advertisements. Review the role ads play as a service to readers and income for a newspaper. Explain that space for editorial content after ads have been placed is called the news hole.

3. Have students identify resources necessary to create, publish and distribute the class or school newspaper and list them on the board. Sort the list into categories based on what resources are available through the school and what must be purchased, borrowed or rented. At a minimum, resources should include equipment and supplies to create and duplicate the newspaper.

4. Share with the class what you estimate each category will cost and the total cost to publish the newspaper. Discuss possible funding options and whether students can sell advertisements (based on school policy). Explain that if they do not sell ads, creating and placing them will be still be part of the project.

5. Review with students what they learned on their newspaper tour about established rates for advertisements based on size and use of color. Explain that the price of ads depends on a newspaper’s circulation, that newspapers with large circulations charge more for ads. Discuss why this is possible (the greater the number of readers, the greater the potential to reach prospective customers.)

6. This would be a good time to review the earlier class discussion (Lesson 9) about a newspaper’s audience or market, how large the newspaper could be and how many copies students could distribute or sell. Explain that the greater the number of copies printed, the lower the printing cost per unit.



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