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«THE INFLUENCE OF DISCIPLINE MANAGEMENT BY HEAD TEACHERS ON STUDENTS’ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN SELECTED PRIVATE SECONDARYSCHOOLS OF BUSIRO COUNTY IN ...»

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THE INFLUENCE OF DISCIPLINE MANAGEMENT BY HEAD

TEACHERS ON STUDENTS’ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

IN SELECTED PRIVATE SECONDARYSCHOOLS OF

BUSIRO COUNTY IN WAKISO DISTRICT

BY

KIGGUNDU HERBERT

2005/HDO4/3110U

SUPERVISOR: DR. SEKABEMBE. B.

A DESSERTATION SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMEN AS A

REQUIREMENT FOR THE AWARD OF DEGREE OF MASTERS

OF ARTS IN EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENT OF

MAKERERE UNIVERISTY

i

DECLARATION

This is to declare that this Dissertation is my original work and to the best of knowledge, it has never been submitted to any university or institution for the award of a degree or presented for publication in any part of the world.

Signature………………………………………………………..

Kiggundu Herbert Date…………………………………………………………… ii APPROVAL This is to certify that this Dissertation whose title is „„The influence of discipline management by head teachers on students‟ academic performance in selected private secondary schools of Busiro County in Wakiso District” is submitted with my approval as University supervisor.

Signed………………………………………………………… Dr. Sekabembe. B SUPERVISOR Date…………………………………………………………..

iii DEDICATION This work is dedicated to my family whose love and care have made it possible for me to go through this programme.

iv

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This work would not have been accomplished with out the encouragement, contribution and inspiration of other people.

My sincere gratitude goes to Dr. Sekabembe Beatrice my supervisor for her genuine and intellectual advice and her effort to transform me intellectually. My appreciations also go to my other professors, senior lectures and lecturers in the East African Institute Of Higher Education and Development Studies, School of Education for their support.

Am deeply indebted to all the respondents to my questionnaires whose sense of concern made it possible for me to collect the required data. My thanks go to the students, teachers and head teachers of Buddo SSS, Sumaya Girls School, Mugwanya Summit SSS and St, Lawrence Citizens‟ high school-Cream land Campus, who participated in this study.

Thanks go to my mum Yudaya Naiga for her tireless effort and hard working to make me what iam. I thank also my wife Harriet, my children Gina and Gilbert for bearing with me the social and financial sacrifices that had to be made so as to accomplish this work. Lastly but not least, thanks go to my course mates for the wonderful cooperation we enjoyed.

The Almighty may protect and keep you in his palm.

–  –  –

Declaration…………………………………………………..…………………………….ii Approval………………………………………………………………………………….iii Dedication………………………………………………………….……………………..iv Acknowledgement……………………………………………..………………………….v Table of contents……………………………………………….…………………………vi Appendices…………………………………………………………………………..…….x List of tables………………………………………………………………….……..….…xi List of figures……………………………………………………………………...……..xii Abstract…………………………………………………...………………………...…...xiii CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION………………………………….……...……...….1

1.1. Background…………………………………………………………...…………..………...1

1.2. Statement of the problem…………………………………………………………………...8

1.3. Purpose of the study…………………………………………………...………………..…..9

1.4. Objectives of the study………………………………………………...……………………9

1.5. Research questions……………………………………………………..…………………..10

1.6. Hypothesis……………………………………………………………………..…...………10

1.7. Scope of the study……………………………………………………………….…………10

1.8. Significance……………………………………………..…………………….…...……….11

–  –  –

2.0. Introduction………………………………………………………………...……..…….….12

2.1. Theoretical framework……………………………….………………….………..……..…12





2.2. Conceptual framework…………………………………..………………………...…….…13

2.3. Review of related literature………………………………………………………………...14 2.3. 1. The effect of management of school rules and regulations by head teachers on students‟ academic performance…………………………………………………………….……….14 2.3. 2. The effect of time management by head teachers on students‟ academic performance...18 2.3. 3. The effect of administration of punishments by head teachers on students‟ academic performance………………………………………………………………………..….....…21 CHAPTER THREE: METHODOLOGY………………………………………….…….26

3.1. Research design………………………………………………………………………..……26

3.2. Study area………………………………………………………………………………...…26

3.3. Population and sample…………………………………………………………..………….27

3.4. Sampling technique……………………………………………………………...……....…28

3.5. Research instruments…………………………………………………………………....….28 3.5.1. Questionnaire………………………………………………………………………..........28 3.5.2. Interview guide………………………………………………………………………..….29

3.6. Validity of research instruments…..…………………………………………………...…..29

3.7. Reliability of research instruments……………………………………………..……..……30

3.8. Data collection procedure………………………………………………………...……..….31

3.9. Data analysis……………………………………………………………………….…….…32

–  –  –

4.0. Introduction……………………………………………………………………………....…33

4.1. The administration of school rules and regulations by head teachers enhances students‟ academic performance…………………………………………………….…………………....….....34

4.2. The observance of time management by head teachers affect students‟ academic performance…………………………………………………………………..……..…..….41

4.3. The administrations of punishments by head teachers affect students‟ academic performance……………………………………………………………………..…...…..…46 CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS………………………….….……….53

5.0. Introduction……………………………………………………………………….…….….53

5.1. Discussion……………………………………………………………………………...…..53 5.1.1. Hypothesis one: The administration of school rules and regulations by head teachers affect students‟ academic performance……………………………………………….…….......…53 5.1.2. Hypothesis two: The observance of time management by head teachers affect students‟ academic performance……………………………………………………………...………56 5.1.3. Hypothesis three: The administration of punishments by head teachers affect students‟ academic performance………………………………………………………………..….…59

5.2. Conclusions……………………………………………………………………… ….….…61

5.3. Recommendations……………………………………………………………………….….63 References………………………………..……………………………………………...….65

–  –  –

Appendix A: Questionnaire to students………………………………….………… …….73 Appendix B: Interview guide……………………………………………….………...….…77 Appendix C: Validity testing Formula…………………………………............…….…..…78 Appendix D: Letter from the Dean‟s office……………………...…………………......…..79 Appendix E: Key to Likert scale………………………………………………………..…..80

–  –  –

Table

1.1. Indiscipline acts in secondary schools in Uganda ……………………………… ….…7

3.1. Sample distribution of the study………….……………………………………... ….…...27

4.1. Students‟ back ground information………………………………...…………………..…33

4.4. Students‟ response about hypothesis one (School rules and regulations)………………...35

4.5. Verification table for hypothesis one……………………………... …………...…………38

4.6. Students‟ response about time management and students‟ academic performance……....41

4.7. Verification table for hypothesis two…………………………………………………...…44

4.8. Responses on the administration of punishments and students‟ academic performance….47

4.9. Verification table for hypothesis three….………………..…………………………….….50

–  –  –

Figure;

2.1. The conceptual framework showing relationship between discipline management and academic performance……………………………………………………..…………………………………13

4.1. The relationship between rules and regulations and students‟ academic performance……......…37

4.2. The relationship between time management and students‟ academic performance………..….…43

4.3. The relationship between administration of punishments and students‟ academic performance...49

–  –  –

The purpose of this study was to establish the influence of discipline management on students‟ academic performance. The study was conducted under three research objectives. These were; to establish how the management of school rules influences students‟ academic performance, to establish how time management influences students‟ academic performance, to establish how the administration of punishments influences students‟ academic performance.

The study employed survey research design particularly cross sectional survey design.

Questionnaire was the main instrument of data collection in addition to interview guide and document review. Four private secondary schools were randomly selected in Busiro County of Wakiso District in which the study was conducted.

The major findings of the study were; all schools have written rules and regulations but which they don‟t understand, some rules and regulations require modifications and others lack consistence in their implementation, which raises students‟ anger leading to violence, strikes and aggression. Also time is poorly managed in school where the designed timetables are not respected. Punishments were found to be unfairly administered that causes dissatisfaction, anger and thus inducing acts of indiscipline such as strikes, vandalism of school property as well as violence among students.

The study came up with the following conclusions based on the study findings; much as school rules help in controlling students‟ behavior in the school, their awareness is lacking among students. Also time being a scarce resource and need to be well planned for through a time

–  –  –

among students. Punishments were also found to be poorly administered to students, which create chaos in schools characterized with school property destruction, and thus affecting students‟ general academic performance.

The study also proposed some recommendations to deal with the wide spread and increasing levels of indiscipline among adolescent youths in secondary schools in Uganda. These include, strengthening school rules and regulations, strengthening counseling and guidance in schools than expelling them, having a uniform discipline code, which will assist parents, students and other stakeholders to appreciate the role of punishments in schools. In addition a strong parentteacher relationship need to be established so as to address the effects of indiscipline in schools, and also head teachers should be the role models of discipline if this struggle is to achieve its objectives.

–  –  –

1.0. Background This chapter presents the historical, theoretical and conceptual backgrounds. It also gives the research problem, purpose and objectives of the study, research questions and hypotheses.

Significance of the study and scope are also presented.



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